Special Issue "Advances in Construction and Building Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Construction and Building Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 January 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Bora Gencturk
Website
Guest Editor
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, United States
Interests: fiber-reinforced concrete; shape-memory alloys; corrosion; alkali-silica reactivity; extreme events

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent incidents of catastrophic failures of aging infrastructure in the United States, Italy, and other parts of the world are unfortunate examples of what is to come at an increasing rate in the next decade(s). At the same time, our society is being challenged by global warming combined with extreme events, including flooding, wildfires, earthquakes and hurricanes. Therefore, the two main challenges for civil engineers and material scientists are to understand the deterioration of existing infrastructure and develop new and high-performance materials that have multifunctionality, self-sensing capabilities and that are not only more durable but also strong, lightweight and eco-friendlier.

There has been some research in these areas, particularly related to the development of fiber-reinforced polymers, shape-memory alloys, self-sensing cement composites, fiber-reinforced cementitious materials, and green concretes. However, further advances are needed, particularly in areas that are cross-cutting and address multiple issues. Therefore, this Special Issue calls for papers in (but not limited to) the following areas:

  • Aging-induced deterioration;
  • Green concretes and alternative cement binders;
  • Shape memory and superelastic alloys;
  • Fiber-reinforced polymers;
  • Fiber-reinforced concrete;
  • High strength and ultra-high strength concretes;
  • Phase change materials;
  • Energy storage through construction materials;
  • Environmental impact studies of new construction materials.

We invite you all to submit review articles, original papers, and communications for this Special Issue. Potential authors are encouraged to send the Guest Editor a title and abstract of their intended paper to get feedback regarding the fitness of their research to this Special Issue.

Dr. Bora Gencturk
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • infrastructure materials aging
  • high-performance materials
  • fiber-reinforced concrete
  • shape-memory alloys
  • fiber-reinforced polymers
  • ultra-high strength concrete
  • green concretes
  • corrosion
  • alkali-aggregate reactivity

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Water Retention Mechanism of HPMC in Cement Mortar
Materials 2020, 13(13), 2918; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13132918 - 29 Jun 2020
Abstract
In this paper, the effect of HPMC (hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose ether) on the cement mortar water retention (WR) and composition was studied. The relationship between the plastic viscosity and water retention of cement mortar was revealed. The results showed that HPMC formed a [...] Read more.
In this paper, the effect of HPMC (hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose ether) on the cement mortar water retention (WR) and composition was studied. The relationship between the plastic viscosity and water retention of cement mortar was revealed. The results showed that HPMC formed a colloidal film with a 3D network structure in water, which changed the ability of water to migrate. The HPMC colloid adsorbed on the surface of cement and sand particles and played a bridging role due to the influence of the spatial network structure of the thin film. Fine particles formed a grid-like distribution, and the hydration products formed a unique fibrous tree-like structure. A positive correlation was observed between the plastic viscosity and the water holding capacity of cement mortar. Finally, the mechanism responsible for the improved water retention of cement mortar by HPMC was analyzed using the changing water migration capacity, migration channels, and mortar cohesion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Construction and Building Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Influence of Fly Ash on Mechanical Properties and Hydration of Calcium Sulfoaluminate-Activated Supersulfated Cement
Materials 2020, 13(11), 2514; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13112514 - 31 May 2020
Abstract
This paper aimed to report the effects of fly ash (FA) on the mechanical properties and hydration of calcium sulfoaluminate-activated supersulfated cement (CSA-SSC). The CSA-SSC comprises of 80% granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS), 15% anhydrite, and 5% high-belite calcium sulfoaluminate cement (HB-CSA) clinker. [...] Read more.
This paper aimed to report the effects of fly ash (FA) on the mechanical properties and hydration of calcium sulfoaluminate-activated supersulfated cement (CSA-SSC). The CSA-SSC comprises of 80% granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS), 15% anhydrite, and 5% high-belite calcium sulfoaluminate cement (HB-CSA) clinker. The hydration products of CSA-SSC with or without FA were investigated by X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis. The experimental results indicated that the addition of FA by 10% to 30% resulted in a decrease in the rate of heat evolution and total heat evolution of CSA-SSC. As the content of FA was increased in the CSA-SSC system, the compressive and flexural strengths of the CSA-SSC with FA after 1 day of hydration were decreased. After 7 days of hydration, the compressive and flexural strength of CSA-SSC mixed with 10 wt.% and 20 wt.% of FA rapidly increased and exceeded that of ordinary Portland cement (OPC), especially the flexural strength. Moreover, the compressive strength of CSA-SSC mixed with 30 wt.% of FA after 90 days of hydration was close to that of OPC, and flexural strength of CSA-SSC mixed with 30 wt.% of FA after 7 days of hydration was close to that of OPC. The hydration products of the CSA-SSC and CSA-SSC mixed with FA were mainly ettringite and calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Construction and Building Materials)
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