materials-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Construction and Building Materials and Their Nondestructive Testing

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Construction and Building Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 November 2023) | Viewed by 4106

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Brisbane, Australia
Interests: pavement engineering; recycled pavement materials; geogrid and geosynthetics application in pavements; unsaturated and expansive soils; soil slope stability and slope monitoring
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Special Issue on “Construction and Building Materials and Their Nondestructive Testing” will address advances in novel and enhanced construction and building materials that can contribute toward economical, long-lasting, environmentally friendly, and climate-adaptive structures. The construction and building materials covered include cement, concrete reinforcement, bricks and mortars, additives, unbound gravel and soil, ceramics, timber, steel, polymers, glass fibres, recycled materials, bamboo, rammed earth, non-conventional building materials, bituminous materials, railway materials, and plasterboards. Further, this Special Issue includes nondestructive testing (NDT) methods to assess the material properties and performance of in-service structures built with the materials mentioned above. The scope of this Special Issue includes materials, NDT, and monitoring aspects of new works and repair and maintenance of civil, environmental, mechanical, electrical, and medical engineering structures. Articles and reviews dealing with laboratory testing, field testing, and numerical modelling on the processing, characterisation, properties, performances, techniques for incorporating these novel materials in construction, quantifications of economic, environmental, climate-adaptive benefits of these materials, and NDT testing on these materials and structures are very welcome.

Associate Professor Chaminda Gallage,

Dr. Chaminda Gallage
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • construction material
  • building materials
  • NDT testing
  • engineering structures
  • laboratory testing
  • field testing and investigation
  • numerical modelling
  • in situ testing

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

17 pages, 15921 KiB  
Article
Investigation of the Neutralizing Behaviors of Cement-Based Materials Using a New pH Indicator Formulated from February Orchid Petals
by Dong Cui, Xiaohan Shi, Wenya Liu, Keren Zheng, Guangji Yin, Jing Wang, Guantong Han, Yi Wan, Junsong Wang and Wenting Li
Materials 2022, 15(22), 8033; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15228033 - 14 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1325
Abstract
Investigation of the neutralizing behavior of concrete is essential, as it can help reveal the durability properties of concrete structures. In this paper, anthocyanin extracted from February orchid (F. orchid) petals was used to characterize the neutralized (carbonated, leached, and sulfate-attacked) regions of [...] Read more.
Investigation of the neutralizing behavior of concrete is essential, as it can help reveal the durability properties of concrete structures. In this paper, anthocyanin extracted from February orchid (F. orchid) petals was used to characterize the neutralized (carbonated, leached, and sulfate-attacked) regions of cement-based materials. The durability of F. orchid indicator was evaluated through comparison between discoloring behaviors of fresh and aged F. orchid indicators, and the capability of the new indicator in neutralization characterization was then verified by combining indicator (phenolphthalein, malachite green, indigo carmine, or thymolphthalein) spray, X-ray computed tomography (CT), and the X-ray attenuation method (XRAM). The result in the present study showed that, with a lower color intensity as compared to phenolphthalein/thymolphthalein, F. orchid indicator was less preferable in studying carbonation but a better choice in characterizing leaching and sulfate attack of cement-based materials. In addition, a sharp carbonation front was revealed in the present study, suggesting that the carbonation process in this study was controlled mainly by diffusion. For leaching and sulfate attack, the broader fronts revealed suggested that both processes were co-controlled by diffusion and reaction. The current work serves as a ‘leap’ toward the application of natural pigments in analyzing the durability of concrete structures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Construction and Building Materials and Their Nondestructive Testing)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 3307 KiB  
Article
Effects of Freeze–Thaw Cycles on the Internal Voids Structure of Asphalt Mixtures
by Di Yu, Haosen Jing and Jianan Liu
Materials 2022, 15(10), 3560; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15103560 - 16 May 2022
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 1787
Abstract
Freeze–thaw cycle is one of the main distresses of asphalt pavement, and the law of freeze–thaw damage has always been an important topic. In this paper, X-ray computed tomography (CT) of asphalt mixture before and after freezing and thawing was carried out, and [...] Read more.
Freeze–thaw cycle is one of the main distresses of asphalt pavement, and the law of freeze–thaw damage has always been an important topic. In this paper, X-ray computed tomography (CT) of asphalt mixture before and after freezing and thawing was carried out, and its two-dimensional (2D) digital image was recognized. Firstly, the eigenvalues of internal voids of asphalt mixture are extracted. Then the distribution of internal voids was analyzed. Finally, the evolution law of internal voids was summarized. The research results show that the characteristic mean value of the 9th cycle is the irreversible limit of freeze–thaw damage, and the non-resilience after the large void area increases is the fundamental reason for the accumulation of freeze–thaw damage. The source of void damage shifts from large voids to small voids, and the middle-stage is a critical stage of freeze–thaw damage. This work quantitatively evaluates the internal freeze–thaw damage process of asphalt mixture, and a morphological theory of the evolution of void damage based on an equivalent ellipse is proposed, which is helpful for better understanding the freezing–thawing damage law of asphalt pavement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Construction and Building Materials and Their Nondestructive Testing)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop