Special Issue "Recent Progress in Sustainable Clay Ceramics"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Dolores Eliche Quesada
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical, Environmental, and Materials Engineering, University of Jaen, Campus Las Lagunillas, s/n, 23071 Jaén, Spain
Interests: Ceramic materials; waste; recycling; sustainability

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Despite the spectacular progress in the knowledge and development of materials in recent years, technological challenges remain that require increasingly sophisticated and specialized materials. Clay ceramics have many advantages over other materials due to their high resistance to wear and corrosion. Improvements in clay ceramics are produced by the addition of new materials, which, due to the optimization of some of their better properties, meet the requirements imposed on their use. Since clay ceramic materials are a class of products that has a significant environmental impact from its manufacture to its disposal, the incorporation of by-products or waste as component elements of compositions can lead to a new generation of materials. This is a unique opportunity through which it is possible to improve the properties of ceramic materials constituting a sustainable and environmentally friendly solution that also offers possibilities in terms of optimizing the technical performance and efficiency of production processes approaching the concept of circular economy. Therefore, clay ceramic materials must incorporate criteria of environmental sustainability, such as high energy efficiency, durability, recovery capacity, renewable resources, use of clean technology, and waste recovery.

It is my pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews that focus on progress in clay ceramics due to the application of new processes or the incorporation into the ceramic structure of certain unusual elements or compounds, which cause profound variations in properties, are all welcome.

Dr. Dolores Eliche Quesada
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ceramic materials
  • clays
  • minerals
  • glasses
  • technical ceramics
  • nanomaterials
  • waste recycling
  • sustainability

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Olive-Pine Bottom Ash on Properties of Geopolymers Based on Metakaolin
Materials 2020, 13(4), 901; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13040901 - 18 Feb 2020
Abstract
In this research, the feasibility of using bottom ashes generated by the combustion of biomass (olive pruning and pine pruning) as a source of aluminosilicates (OPBA) has been studied, replacing the metakaolin precursor (MK) in different proportions (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 [...] Read more.
In this research, the feasibility of using bottom ashes generated by the combustion of biomass (olive pruning and pine pruning) as a source of aluminosilicates (OPBA) has been studied, replacing the metakaolin precursor (MK) in different proportions (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 wt.% substitution) for the synthesis of geopolymers. As alkaline activator an 8 M NaOH solution and a Na2SiO3 have been used. The geopolymers were cured 24 h in a climatic chamber at 60 °C in a water-saturated atmosphere, subsequently demoulded and cured at room temperature for 28 days. The results indicated that the incorporation of OPBA waste, which have 19.7 wt.% of Ca, modifies the characteristics of the products formed after alkaline activation. In general terms, the incorporation of increasing amounts of calcium-rich ashes results in geopolymers with higher bulk density. The compressive strength increases with the addition of up to 50 wt.% of OPBA with respect to the control geopolymers, contributing the composition of the residue to the acquisition of better mechanical behavior. The results indicate the potential use of these OPBA waste as raw material to produce unconventional cements with 28-day curing strengths greater than 10 MPa, and thermal conductivities less than 0.35 W/mK. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Progress in Sustainable Clay Ceramics)
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Open AccessArticle
Development of Photocatalytic Coatings by Thermal Hydrolysis of TiCl4 on Ceramic Roofing Tiles Made from Ferroalumina and Evaluation of De-Pollution Properties
Materials 2020, 13(3), 620; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13030620 - 30 Jan 2020
Abstract
The development of new, environmental friendly building materials with photocatalytic properties remain still on the top of the investigations both for academy and industry. The main drive is the increasing air pollution and the greenhouse gas emissions that have negative effect on public [...] Read more.
The development of new, environmental friendly building materials with photocatalytic properties remain still on the top of the investigations both for academy and industry. The main drive is the increasing air pollution and the greenhouse gas emissions that have negative effect on public health and buildings. Ceramic roofing tiles functionalized with TiO2 can contribute on tackling these severe environmental problems by improving their properties. In this study, heavy clay ceramics manufactured from clay-body mixture and a Bayer process bauxite residue (ferroalumina) are used as substrates for the deposition of TiO2 coatings in order to produce self-cleaning ceramic surfaces. The process is based on the thermal hydrolysis of TiCl4 which takes place in a CVD reactor under atmospheric conditions. All coated samples were annealed at 600 °C and characterized in means of XRD, SEM/EDS and degradation ability of an organic pollutant. The formation of titania mixed phases (rutile and perovskite) shows positive results regarding the photocatalytic activity of the samples. The ones containing ferroalumina decomposed 100% the indigo carmine solution after 4 h, in comparison with the reference one which presented lower efficiency. Finally, this paper addresses technical feasible solutions for the production of photocatalytic active ceramics within the concept of circular economy and environmental sustainability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Progress in Sustainable Clay Ceramics)
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Open AccessArticle
Wood Bottom Ash and GeoSilex: A By-Product of the Acetylene Industry as Alternative Raw Materials in Calcium Silicate Units
Materials 2020, 13(2), 489; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13020489 - 20 Jan 2020
Abstract
The main objective of this research was to obtain calcium silicate units from alternative raw materials, such as the bottom ashes from the combustion of wooden boards (WBA), as a source of silica, and GeoSilex (G), a by-product with low energy and environmental [...] Read more.
The main objective of this research was to obtain calcium silicate units from alternative raw materials, such as the bottom ashes from the combustion of wooden boards (WBA), as a source of silica, and GeoSilex (G), a by-product with low energy and environmental costs generated in the manufacture of acetylene, as a source of lime. Once the raw materials were physically, mineralogically and chemically characterized, calcium silicate units were obtained by mixing different amounts of WBA residue (90–20 wt%) and G by-product (10–80 wt%). The mixtures were compressed at 10 MPa and cured in water for 28 days. The calcium silicate units were subjected to a wide experimental program that included the determination of physical properties (bulk density, apparent porosity and water absorption), mechanical properties (compressive strength), and thermal properties (thermal conductivity). Optimum values are obtained for calcium silicate units that contain a 1/1 WBA/G weight ratio, which have an optimal amount of SiO2 and CaO for the cementation reaction. The 50WBA-50g units have compressive strength values of 46.9 MPa and a thermal conductivity value of 0.40 W/mK. However, all calcium silicate units obtained comply with the European Standard EN 771-2: 2011 to be used as structural building materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Progress in Sustainable Clay Ceramics)
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Open AccessArticle
Spent Coffee Grounds in the Production of Lightweight Clay Ceramic Aggregates in View of Urban and Agricultural Sustainable Development
Materials 2019, 12(21), 3581; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12213581 - 31 Oct 2019
Abstract
This paper presents an innovative application for spent coffee grounds (SCGs) used as filler for the formulation of lightweight clay ceramic aggregates (LWA). LWA can be used for urban and agricultural purposes as a sustainable solution. Spent coffee grounds were tested as a [...] Read more.
This paper presents an innovative application for spent coffee grounds (SCGs) used as filler for the formulation of lightweight clay ceramic aggregates (LWA). LWA can be used for urban and agricultural purposes as a sustainable solution. Spent coffee grounds were tested as a pore forming agent partially acting as a replacement for red clay in material formulation before firing. Substitutions of 10, 15, and 20 wt.% of red clay were tested. The properties of lightweight aggregates with 15 wt.% of SCGs were improved using a specifically tailored fertilizer glass due to its low pH and conductivity within the soil tolerance range. Packaging glassy sand, cattle-bone flour ash, and potassium carbonate were mixed and melted in order to obtain this glass, which when added to the clayey batch functionalized the aggregates by phosphorus and potassium nutrients. The results (in particular, porosity and bulk density) show that the lightweight aggregates obtained have interesting properties for possible uses both in urban (e.g., green roofs as a drainage layer) and agricultural purposes. Moreover, pH and conductivity are in line with the Italian Standard regarding soil amendment (D.lgs. 75/2010). In addition, several leaching tests were performed in a solution containing 2 vol.% citric acid (C6H8O7) to evaluate the release capacity not only of nutrients (P and K) but also to check the presence and release of heavy metals, such as lead (Pb), that may come from the glassy precursor. The results obtained showed that nutrients are efficiently released in 21 days (P = 87.73% and K = 25.74% of released percentage) and Pb release is under the standard threshold of 30 ppm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Progress in Sustainable Clay Ceramics)
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Open AccessArticle
Waste-Based Pigments for Application in Ceramic Glazes and Stoneware Bodies
Materials 2019, 12(20), 3396; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12203396 - 17 Oct 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The use of wastes, some of them hazards, as raw materials of ceramic pigments has been a way to diminish their environmental impact, to economically valorize them, and to face the depletion of virgin raw materials. In this work were prepared pigments having [...] Read more.
The use of wastes, some of them hazards, as raw materials of ceramic pigments has been a way to diminish their environmental impact, to economically valorize them, and to face the depletion of virgin raw materials. In this work were prepared pigments having in their composition only industrial wastes: Cr/Ni electroplating (ES), and sludges from the cutting of natural stones—marble (MS) and granite (GS). The prepared mixtures were calcined at three temperatures (1100, 1200, and 1300 °C) and the obtained powders were characterized by XRD and UV-vis. Their coloring strength and thermal stability were assessed by adding them to different ceramic substrates: glazes (transparent bright and opaque matte) and a stoneware paste. The CIEL*a*b* coordinates of the fired materials were measured. The developed pigments are thermally stable and exhibit good tinting power, originating nicely colored and defect-free ceramic materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Progress in Sustainable Clay Ceramics)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. Title: Effect of Olive- Pine Fly Ash on Properties of Geopolymers Based on Metakaolin

Authors: E. Bonet-Martínez, C. López-Mora, L. Pérez-Villarejo, E. Castro, D. Eliche-Quesada
Affiliation: Department of Chemical, Environmental, and Materials Engineering, Higher Polytechnic School of Jaén, University of Jaen, Campus Las Lagunillas s/n, 23071 Jaén, Spain

2. Title: Calcium Silicate Units Using As Raw Materials Wood Ash and Geosilex A Subproduct of the Acetylene Industry

Authors: M. Felipe-Sesé, L. Pérez-Villarejo, E. Castro, D. Eliche-Quesada
Affiliation: Department of Chemical, Environmental, and Materials Engineering, Higher Polytechnic School of Jaén, University of Jaen, Campus Las Lagunillas s/n, 23071 Jaén, Spain

3. Title: Spent Coffee Grounds in Lightweight Ceramic Aggregates Cleaner Production in View of Urban and Agricultural Sustainable Development

Authors: Fernanda Andreola, Alessandro Borghi, Simone Pedrazzi, Giulio Allesina, Paolo Tartarini, Isabella Lancellotti, Luisa Barbieri
Affiliation: Dipartimento di Ingegneria "Enzo Ferrari", Università degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Pietro Vivarelli 10, 41125 Modena

4. Title: Waste-Based Pigments for Application in Ceramic Glazes and Stoneware Bodies

Authors: J. Carneiro, D.M. Tobaldi, M.N. Capela, M.P. Seabra, J.A. Labrincha
Affiliation: University of Aveiro, CICECO, Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, 3810-193, Aveiro, Portugal

5. Title: Development of Photocatalytic Coatings on Ceramic Roofing Tiles Comprised of Industrial Wastes by Thermal Hydrolysis of TiCl4

Authors: Angeliki Christogerou, Dimitra Koumpouri, George Angelopoulos
Affiliation: Laboratory of Materials and Metallurgy, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, Rio 26500, Greece

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