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Biochemical/Inorganic Hybrid Materials

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2021) | Viewed by 6187

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science Division II, Tokyo University of Science, Tokyo, Japan
Interests: coordination chemistry; bioinorganic chemistry; redox catalyst; self-assembling materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

By now, biochemistry and material science have been independently developed. As it has progressed, biochemistry has given many findings in relation to various organisms and biomolecules. In addition, material science has produced abundant materials with attractive features and functions. Nowadays, on their boundary field, novel biochemical/inorganic hybrid materials are a key focus. In this new field, by taking advantage of each field, many hybrid materials with attractive and practical functions have been obtained. These hybrid materials are composed of microbes or biomolecules and inorganic materials such as nanoparticles, substrates, and metal organic framework (MOF) compounds. For example, hybrid materials composed of enzymes and inorganic substrates or nanoparticles are used as biosensors and/or biofuel cells. In those studies, enzymes are used instead of inorganic catalysts to achieve desired functions under ambient conditions. Furthermore, by using their metabolism, many microbe-immobilized materials are also reported. In this field, improvements of substrates as electrodes or mediators are being researched. In recent years, hybrid materials composed of proteins and MOFs have been curiously investigated. These materials immobilize proteins on the surface of MOFs, or the proteins themselves are constituents of MOFs as pillar, and their properties receive much research attention.

This Special Issue of Materials, “Biochemical/Inorganic Hybrid Materials”, deals with not only biosensors and biofuel cells, as mentioned above, but also with related hybrid materials such as catalysts, protein- or microbe-immobilization, stabilization of proteins or enzymes, and self-assembled monolayers.

Dr. Daisuke Nakane
Prof. Dr. Takashiro Akitsu
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • biochemistry;
  • inorganic materials;
  • material science;
  • hybrid material;
  • biosensor;
  • biofuel cell;
  • microbe-/protein-immobilized substrate;
  • catalyst;
  • self-assembled monolayer;
  • metal organic framework;
  • nanoparticles.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 7363 KiB  
Article
Newly-Obtained Two Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Compounds Based on Potassium Peroxidomolybdate and Dicarboxypyridinic Acid: Structure Determination, Catalytic Properties, and Cytotoxic Effects of Eight Peroxidomolybdates in Colon and Hepatic Cancer Cells
by Adrianna Sławińska, Małgorzata Tyszka-Czochara, Paweł Serda, Marcin Oszajca, Małgorzata Ruggiero-Mikołajczyk, Katarzyna Pamin, Robert Karcz and Wiesław Łasocha
Materials 2022, 15(1), 241; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15010241 - 29 Dec 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1520
Abstract
Two new organic-inorganic hybrid compounds containing dicarboxylic pyridine acids have been obtained and characterized. Both compounds are potassium oxidodiperoxidomolybdates with 2,6-dicarboxylicpyridine acid or 3,5-dicarboxylicpyridine acid moieties, respectively. The chemical formula for the first one is C14H7K3Mo2 [...] Read more.
Two new organic-inorganic hybrid compounds containing dicarboxylic pyridine acids have been obtained and characterized. Both compounds are potassium oxidodiperoxidomolybdates with 2,6-dicarboxylicpyridine acid or 3,5-dicarboxylicpyridine acid moieties, respectively. The chemical formula for the first one is C14H7K3Mo2N2O18 denoted as K26dcpa, the second C7H4K1Mo1N1O11.5K35dcpa. Their crystal structures were determined using single crystal (K26dcpa) or XRPD—X-ray powder diffraction techniques (K35dcpa). The purity of the compounds was confirmed by elemental analysis. Their thermal stability was determined with the use of non-ambient XRPD. In addition, they were examined by IR spectroscopy methods and catalytic activity studies were performed for them. Catalytic tests in the Baeyer–Villiger reaction and biological activity have been performed for eight compounds: K26dcpa, K35dcpa, and six peroxidomolybdates previously obtained by our group. The anti-proliferative activity of peroxidomolybdenum compounds after 24 h of incubation was studied in vitro against three selected human tumor cell lines (SW620, LoVo, HEP G2) and normal human cells (fibroblasts). The data were expressed as IC50 values. The structure of the investigated oxodiperoxomolybdenum compounds was shown to have influence on the biological activity and catalytic properties. It has been shown that the newly-obtained compound, K35dcpa, is a very efficient catalyst in the Baeyer–Villiger reaction. The best biological activity results were obtained for Na-picO (previously obtained by us), which is a very effective anti-cancer agent towards SW 620 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biochemical/Inorganic Hybrid Materials)
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11 pages, 1745 KiB  
Article
The Effect of AlI3 Nanoadditive on the Thermal Behavior of PMMA Subjected to Thermoanalytical Py-GC-MS Technique
by Muhammad Adnan, Taj Ur Rahman, Ali Bahadur, Muhammad Aurang Zeb, Wajiha Liaqat, Takashiro Akitsu, Shams H. Abdel-Hafez and Wael A. El-Sayed
Materials 2021, 14(22), 7036; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14227036 - 19 Nov 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1908
Abstract
Thermal degradation of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) was studied by using inorganic salt of aluminum triiodide (AlI3). The composites of PMMA were prepared with AlI3 by changing the concentration of the AlI3 additive from 2% to 10% (w/w [...] Read more.
Thermal degradation of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) was studied by using inorganic salt of aluminum triiodide (AlI3). The composites of PMMA were prepared with AlI3 by changing the concentration of the AlI3 additive from 2% to 10% (w/w). The PMMA composites with AlI3 were characterized by TGA, DTG, SEM, FTIR, HBT, and Py-GC-MS techniques. The FTIR peaks of PMMA composite at 1316, 786, and 693 cm−1 justify the chemical association between PMMA and AlI3. TGA study shows that the stability of PMMA is enhanced by the addition of the AlI3 additive. SEM analysis represented that there is a relationship between polymer and additive when they are mixed at the molecular level. The horizontal burning test (HBT) also confirmed that the AlI3 additive produced the flame retarding properties in PMMA polymer. The burning rate of composite with 10% of AlI3 additive decreases five times as much as compared to pure PMMA polymer. Py-GC-MS analysis deduced that PMMA composite produced less toxic and environment-friendly substances (CO2) by the influence of AlI3 additive as compared to neat PMMA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biochemical/Inorganic Hybrid Materials)
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20 pages, 4229 KiB  
Article
One-Pot Self-Assembly of Dinuclear, Tetranuclear, and H-Bonding-Directed Polynuclear Cobalt(II), Cobalt(III), and Mixed-Valence Co(II)/Co(III) Complexes of Schiff Base Ligands with Incomplete Double Cubane Core
by Santokh S. Tandon, Neil Patel, Scott D. Bunge, Esther C. Wang, Rachel Thompson and Laurence K. Thompson
Materials 2020, 13(23), 5425; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13235425 - 28 Nov 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1860
Abstract
The reaction of 2,6-diformyl-4-methylphenol (DFMF) with 1-amino-2-propanol (AP) and tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (THMAM) was investigated in the presence of Cobalt(II) salts, (X = ClO4, CH3CO2, Cl, NO3), sodium azide (NaN3), [...] Read more.
The reaction of 2,6-diformyl-4-methylphenol (DFMF) with 1-amino-2-propanol (AP) and tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (THMAM) was investigated in the presence of Cobalt(II) salts, (X = ClO4, CH3CO2, Cl, NO3), sodium azide (NaN3), and triethylamine (TEA). In one pot, the variation in Cobalt(II) salt results in the self-assembly of dinuclear, tetranuclear, and H-bonding-directed polynuclear coordination complexes of Cobalt(III), Cobalt(II), and mixed-valence CoIICoIII: [Co2III(H2L1)2(AP1)(N3)](ClO4)2 (1), [Co4(H2L1)23-1,1,1-N3)2(µ-1,1-N3)2Cl2(CH3OH)2]·4CH3OH (2), [Co2IICo2III(HL2)2(µ-CH3CO2)23-OH)2](NO3)2·2CH3CH2OH (3), and [Co2IICo2III (H2L12)2(THMAM−1)2](NO3)4 (4). In 1, two cobalt(III) ions are connected via three single atom bridges; two from deprotonated ethanolic oxygen atoms in the side arms of the ligands and one from the1-amino-2-propanol moiety forming a dinuclear unit with a very short (2.5430(11) Å) Co-Co intermetallic separation with a coordination number of 7, a rare feature for cobalt(III). In 2, two cobalt(II) ions in a dinuclear unit are bridged through phenoxide O and μ3-1,1,1-N3 azido bridges, and the two dinuclear units are interconnected by two μ-1,1-N3 and two μ3-1,1,1-N3 azido bridges generating tetranuclear cationic [Co4(H2L1)23-1,1,1-N3)2(µ-1,1-N3)2Cl2(CH3OH)2]2+ units with an incomplete double cubane core, which grow into polynuclear 1D-single chains along the a-axis through H-bonding. In 3, HL2− holds mixed-valent Co(II)/Co(III) ions in a dinuclear unit bridged via phenoxide O, μ-1,3-CH3CO2, and μ3-OH bridges, and the dinuclear units are interconnected through two deprotonated ethanolic O in the side arms of the ligands and two μ3-OH bridges generating cationic tetranuclear [Co2IICo2III(HL2)2(µ-CH3CO2)23-OH)2]2+ units with an incomplete double cubane core. In 4, H2L1−2 holds mixed-valent Co(II)/Co(III) ions in dinuclear units which dimerize through two ethanolic O (μ-RO) in the side arms of the ligands and two ethanolic O (μ3-RO) of THMAM bridges producing centrosymmetric cationic tetranuclear [Co2IICo2III (H2L12)2(THMAM−1)2]4+ units which grow into 2D-sheets along the bc-axis through a network of H-bonding. Bulk magnetization measurements on 2 demonstrate that the magnetic interactions are completely dominated by an overall ferromagnetic coupling occurring between Co(II) ions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biochemical/Inorganic Hybrid Materials)
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