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Special Issue of NEGATIVE Data in Chemistry

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Inorganic Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020) | Viewed by 6201

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Data accumulation of NEGATIVE data as well as positive or successful ones may become important recently in chemistry, because deriving useful results is possible from bigdata recently. "Failure" or not so good results based on working hypothesis aimed may not be meaningless from the view point of other researchers. In this special issue, we focused on such results or data not only chirality that the guest editor is interested in but also all field of chemistry.

Prof. Dr. Takashiro Akitsu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

7 pages, 1533 KiB  
Communication
Success or Failure of Chiral Crystallization of Similar Heterocyclic Compounds
by Cyprian M. Chunkang, Iris E. Ikome, Emmanuel N. Nfor, Yuta Mitani, Natsuki Katsuumi, Tomoyuki Haraguchi and Takashiro Akitsu
Molecules 2020, 25(23), 5691; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25235691 - 2 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1755
Abstract
Single crystals of two achiral and planar heterocyclic compounds, C9H8H3O(CA1) and C8H5NO2 (CA4), recrystallized from ethanol, were characterized by single crystal X-ray analysis, respectively, and chiral crystallization was [...] Read more.
Single crystals of two achiral and planar heterocyclic compounds, C9H8H3O(CA1) and C8H5NO2 (CA4), recrystallized from ethanol, were characterized by single crystal X-ray analysis, respectively, and chiral crystallization was observed only for CA1 as P212121 (# 19), whereas it was not observed for CA4P21/c (# 14). In CA1, as a monohydrate, the hydrogen bonds were pronounced around the water of crystallization (O4), and the planar cyclic sites were arranged in parallel to slightly tilted positions. On the other hand, an anhydride CA4 formed a dimer by hydrogen bonds between adjacent molecules in the crystal, which were aggregated by van der Waals forces and placed in parallel planar cyclic sites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Special Issue of NEGATIVE Data in Chemistry)
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12 pages, 3421 KiB  
Article
Development of Microdroplet Generation Method for Organic Solvents Used in Chemical Synthesis
by Shohei Hattori, Chenghe Tang, Daiki Tanaka, Dong Hyun Yoon, Yoshito Nozaki, Hiroyuki Fujita, Takashiro Akitsu, Tetsushi Sekiguchi and Shuichi Shoji
Molecules 2020, 25(22), 5360; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25225360 - 17 Nov 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3530
Abstract
Recently, chemical operations with microfluidic devices, especially droplet-based operations, have attracted considerable attention because they can provide an isolated small-volume reaction field. However, analysis of these operations has been limited mostly to aqueous-phase reactions in water droplets due to device material restrictions. In [...] Read more.
Recently, chemical operations with microfluidic devices, especially droplet-based operations, have attracted considerable attention because they can provide an isolated small-volume reaction field. However, analysis of these operations has been limited mostly to aqueous-phase reactions in water droplets due to device material restrictions. In this study, we have successfully demonstrated droplet formation of five common organic solvents frequently used in chemical synthesis by using a simple silicon/glass-based microfluidic device. When an immiscible liquid with surfactant was used as the continuous phase, the organic solvent formed droplets similar to water-in-oil droplets in the device. In contrast to conventional microfluidic devices composed of resins, which are susceptible to swelling in organic solvents, the developed microfluidic device did not undergo swelling owing to the high chemical resistance of the constituent materials. Therefore, the device has potential applications for various chemical reactions involving organic solvents. Furthermore, this droplet generation device enabled control of droplet size by adjusting the liquid flow rate. The droplet generation method proposed in this work will contribute to the study of organic reactions in microdroplets and will be useful for evaluating scaling effects in various chemical reactions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Special Issue of NEGATIVE Data in Chemistry)
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