Special Issue "Recent Advances in Cellular Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Katarina Monkova
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Manufacturing Technologies with the Seat in Presov, Technical University of Kosice, Presov, Slovakia
Interests: cellular materials; behavior and mechanical properties of cellular structures; technical systems design and manufacturing technologies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent fast developments in the materials and manufacturing technologies have enabled us to produce new types of sophisticated components that are substantially lighter than traditional products, which are filled by material in the entire volume. This is thanks to so-called cellular materials, which are characterized by periodic or stochastic arrangements of open or closed cell types with either two-dimensional cell configurations (honeycombs), three-dimensional polyhedral layouts (lattice structures) or triple periodic complex structures (e.g., minimal surfaces). These cellular materials can provide the product with extraordinary combination of properties in relation to their weight when compared to solid materials.

Attempting to incorporate sophisticated structures into the design of parts is motivated by a desire for an increased added value of the product, shortening production time and reducing the consumption of expensive materials. From the view of the assumed properties, the use of such structures appears to have excellent potential not only in the fields of industry (automotive, navy, aerospace, engineering, civil engineering industries), but also in biomedicine or in the household appliances.

Potential topics include but are not limited to:

  • Recent novelty in cellular materials design;
  • Behavior and simulation of cellular materials;
  • Regular and irregular cellular materials manufacturing;
  • Extraordinary properties of cellular materials;
  • Experimental study of cellular materials;
  • Application of cellular materials in a technical practice.

Prof. Katarina Monkova
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cellular material
  • Design
  • Manufacturing
  • Properties
  • Application

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

Open AccessArticle
Improving the Mechanical Strength of Dental Applications and Lattice Structures SLM Processed
Materials 2020, 13(4), 905; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13040905 - 18 Feb 2020
Abstract
To manufacture custom medical parts or scaffolds with reduced defects and high mechanical characteristics, new research on optimizing the selective laser melting (SLM) parameters are needed. In this work, a biocompatible powder, 316L stainless steel, is characterized to understand the particle size, distribution, [...] Read more.
To manufacture custom medical parts or scaffolds with reduced defects and high mechanical characteristics, new research on optimizing the selective laser melting (SLM) parameters are needed. In this work, a biocompatible powder, 316L stainless steel, is characterized to understand the particle size, distribution, shape and flowability. Examination revealed that the 316L particles are smooth, nearly spherical, their mean diameter is 39.09 μm and just 10% of them hold a diameter less than 21.18 μm. SLM parameters under consideration include laser power up to 200 W, 250–1500 mm/s scanning speed, 80 μm hatch spacing, 35 μm layer thickness and a preheated platform. The effect of these on processability is evaluated. More than 100 samples are SLM-manufactured with different process parameters. The tensile results show that is possible to raise the ultimate tensile strength up to 840 MPa, adapting the SLM parameters for a stable processability, avoiding the technological defects caused by residual stress. Correlating with other recent studies on SLM technology, the tensile strength is 20% improved. To validate the SLM parameters and conditions established, complex bioengineering applications such as dental bridges and macro-porous grafts are SLM-processed, demonstrating the potential to manufacture medical products with increased mechanical resistance made of 316L. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Cellular Materials)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Dealing with Nap-Core Sandwich Composites: How to Predict the Effect of Symmetry
Materials 2019, 12(6), 874; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12060874 - 15 Mar 2019
Abstract
The behavior of nap-core sandwiches was investigated with a special focus on the effect of symmetry in nap cores. A nap-core is, in general terms, a 3D-formed hollow structure made of knitted textile impregnated by a thermosetting resin. The molding process determines if [...] Read more.
The behavior of nap-core sandwiches was investigated with a special focus on the effect of symmetry in nap cores. A nap-core is, in general terms, a 3D-formed hollow structure made of knitted textile impregnated by a thermosetting resin. The molding process determines if the nap-core is double-sided (symmetric) or single-sided. The sandwich with nap-core owns various remarkable properties of a novel lightweight material, but the nap-core’s complex structure makes the prediction of these properties a difficult task. While the analysis of a single-sided nap-core sandwich has been presented by the authors before, this study is focused on the simulation of symmetric nap-core sandwich. Overall, performance of the structure is examined with respect to several loading conditions. The simulation approach invokes a typical homogenization scheme to find the engineering properties of the nap-core’s fabric with least computational time and memory resources. Results from experiments and simulations exhibit a good compatibility, which prove the fitness of the modeling method. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Cellular Materials)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

Open AccessPerspective
Four Questions in Cellular Material Design
Materials 2019, 12(7), 1060; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12071060 - 31 Mar 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
The design of cellular materials has recently undergone a paradigm shift, enabled by developments in Additive Manufacturing and design software. No longer do cellular materials have to be limited to traditional shapes such as honeycomb panels or stochastic foams. With this increase in [...] Read more.
The design of cellular materials has recently undergone a paradigm shift, enabled by developments in Additive Manufacturing and design software. No longer do cellular materials have to be limited to traditional shapes such as honeycomb panels or stochastic foams. With this increase in design freedom comes a significant increase in optionality, which can be overwhelming to the designer. This paper aims to provide a framework for thinking about the four key questions in cellular material design: how to select a unit cell, how to vary cell size spatially, what the optimal parameters are, and finally, how best to integrate a cellular material within the structure at large. These questions are posed with the intent of stimulating further research that can address them individually, as well as integrate them in a systematic methodology for cellular material design. Different state-of-the-art solution approaches are also presented in order to provoke further investigation by the reader. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Cellular Materials)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop