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Modeling and Advanced Experimental Techniques in Deformation Processing of Metallic Materials

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Metals and Alloys".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 May 2024) | Viewed by 6260

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
IMDEA Materials Institute, 28906 Getafe, Madrid, Spain
Interests: physical simulation of metallurgical processes; thermo-mechanical processing of metallic materials; alloy–processing–structure–property relationship in metallic materials
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Guest Editor
Centre for Advanced Steels Research, Materials and Mechanical Engineering, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu, Finland
Interests: materials engineering; physical metallurgy; mechanical metallurgy; physical and numerical simulation and modeling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metallic materials have been a part of human society for several millennia, and thanks to the strenuous efforts of materials researchers, they now form the backbone of modern society due to the versatility of their mechanical and functional properties, combined with their pertinence over a wide temperature range and their recyclability. There are many different types of metallic materials, each carrying different chemical, physical and microstructural features and properties. Therefore, they have been used by every industry on the planet to fabricate everything from sewing needles to oil tankers and airplanes, as well as all the tools required to produce them.

In this Special Issue, we seek to provide a wide array of research articles on recent advances in the areas of alloy chemistry design, the thermo-mechanical processing of metallic materials, the physical simulation of metallurgical processes, the characterization of metallic materials using cutting-edge experimental and structural metallurgy techniques, and the development of theoretical tools and advanced models to predict their microstructures and properties during or after thermo-mechanical processing. We hope that this Special Issue will serve as a platform showing the current state-of-the-art and latest developments in this field.

The main objective of this Special Issue is to facilitate a more intense development in this area of research and to showcase these recent developments to industry. We hope that this Special Issue will help the research community to formulate new challenging problems and directions in metallurgy, in addition to motivating young researchers and raising their interest in addressing these problems.

As Guest Editors of this Special Issue, we would like to thank the Editors of Materials, who made this Special Issue possible. We also thank in advance the prospective authors and reviewers of the selected papers in this Special Issue for their unrelenting commitment to the advancement of science.

Dr. Ilchat Sabirov
Prof. Dr. Mahesh Somani
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • simulation and modelling
  • advanced metallic materials
  • deformation processing
  • experimental techniques
  • microstructures
  • mechanical properties

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 4211 KiB  
Article
Visual Computation of Material Microstructure and Deformation
by Rongshan Qin
Materials 2024, 17(12), 2854; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17122854 - 11 Jun 2024
Viewed by 237
Abstract
The experimentally obtained material microstructure can be used to calculate a material’s properties and identify microstructure–property relationships. The key procedure to enable this is to interpret the observed microstructure accurately. This work reports on a newly developed computational method to serve such a [...] Read more.
The experimentally obtained material microstructure can be used to calculate a material’s properties and identify microstructure–property relationships. The key procedure to enable this is to interpret the observed microstructure accurately. This work reports on a newly developed computational method to serve such a purpose. The method is based on cubic spline interpolation and a simple search algorithm. Parameterisation was accomplished via the comparison between its preliminary statistical results and the information in a phase diagram. The method was applied to analyse the quenched microstructure of multicomponent and multiphase metallic-oxide materials. The importance of adequate parameterisation is demonstrated. The results provide a good explanation for the experimentally measured electric conductance behaviour. Further application of the method to the deformation of materials is discussed. The algorithms are directly available for the analysis of the three-dimensional microstructure of materials. Full article
17 pages, 18776 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Viscous Drag on the Maximum Residual Stresses Achievable in High-Yield-Strength Materials in Laser Shock Processing
by Ignacio Angulo, Wsewolod Warzanskyj, Francisco Cordovilla, Marcos Díaz, Juan Antonio Porro, Ángel García-Beltrán and José Luis Ocaña
Materials 2023, 16(21), 6858; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16216858 - 25 Oct 2023
Viewed by 771
Abstract
In this paper, the experimentally observed significant increase in yield stress for strain rates beyond 104 s−1 (viscous regime) is explicitly considered in laser shock processing (LSP) simulations. First, a detailed review of the most common high-strain-rate deformation models is presented, [...] Read more.
In this paper, the experimentally observed significant increase in yield stress for strain rates beyond 104 s−1 (viscous regime) is explicitly considered in laser shock processing (LSP) simulations. First, a detailed review of the most common high-strain-rate deformation models is presented, highlighting the expected strain rates in materials subject to LSP for a wide range of treatment conditions. Second, the abrupt yield stress increase presented beyond 104 s−1 is explicitly considered in the material model of a titanium alloy subject to LSP. A combined numerical–analytical approach is used to predict the time evolution of the plastic strain. Finally, extended areas are irradiated covering a squared area of 25 × 25 mm2 for numerical–experimental validation. The in-depth experimental residual stress profiles are obtained by means of the hole drilling method. Near-surface-temperature gradients are explicitly considered in simulations. In summary, the conventionally accepted strain rate range in LSP (106–107 s−1) is challenged in this paper. Results show that the conventional high-strain-rate hardening models widely used in LSP simulations (i.e., Johnson Cook model) clearly overestimate the induced compressive residual stresses. Additionally, pressure decay, whose importance is usually neglected, has been found to play a significant role in the total plastic strain achieved by LSP treatments. Full article
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27 pages, 22165 KiB  
Article
Aluminium Matrix Composites Reinforced with AlCrFeMnNi HEA Particulates: Microstructure, Mechanical and Corrosion Properties
by Elias A. Ananiadis, Alexandros E. Karantzalis, Athanasios K. Sfikas, Emmanuel Georgatis and Theodore E. Matikas
Materials 2023, 16(15), 5491; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16155491 - 6 Aug 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1713
Abstract
Novel aluminium matrix composites have been fabricated using a powder metallurgy route with reinforcement phase particles of high entropy alloy (HEA) consisting of third transition metals. These new composites are studied as far as their microstructure (SEM, XRD), basic mechanical properties (hardness, elastic [...] Read more.
Novel aluminium matrix composites have been fabricated using a powder metallurgy route with reinforcement phase particles of high entropy alloy (HEA) consisting of third transition metals. These new composites are studied as far as their microstructure (SEM, XRD), basic mechanical properties (hardness, elastic modulus) and creep response using nanoindentation techniques are concerned. Wear (sliding wear tests) and corrosion behaviour (in 3.5 wt.% NaCl environment) were also assessed. It was observed that, microstructurally, no secondary intermetallic phases were formed. Hardness and wear resistance seemed to increase with the increase in HEA particles, and in terms of corrosion, the composites exhibited susceptibility to localised forms. Nanoindentation techniques and creep response showed findings that are connected with the deformation nature of both the Al matrix and the HEA reinforcing phase. Full article
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21 pages, 15055 KiB  
Article
On the Influence of Heat Input on Ni-WC GMAW Hardfaced Coating Properties
by Jan Pawlik, Michał Bembenek, Tomasz Góral, Jacek Cieślik, Janusz Krawczyk, Aneta Łukaszek-Sołek, Tomasz Śleboda and Łukasz Frocisz
Materials 2023, 16(11), 3960; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16113960 - 25 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1278
Abstract
Hardfacing is one of the techniques used for part lifecycle elongation. Despite being used for over 100 years, there still is much to discover, as modern metallurgy provides more and more sophisticated alloys, which then have to be studied to find the best [...] Read more.
Hardfacing is one of the techniques used for part lifecycle elongation. Despite being used for over 100 years, there still is much to discover, as modern metallurgy provides more and more sophisticated alloys, which then have to be studied to find the best technological parameters in order to fully utilize complex material properties. One of the most efficient and versatile hardfacing approaches is Gas Metal Arc Welding technology (GMAW) and its cored-wire equivalent, known as FCAW (Flux-Cored/Cored Arc Welding). In this paper, the authors study the influence of heat input on the geometrical properties and hardness of stringer weld beads fabricated from cored wire consisting of macrocrystalline tungsten carbides in a nickel matrix. The aim is to establish a set of parameters which allow to manufacture wear-resistant overlays with high deposition rates, preserving all possible benefits of this heterogenic material. This study shows, that for a given diameter of the Ni-WC wire, there exists an upper limit of heat input beyond which the tungsten carbide crystals may exhibit undesired segregation at the root. Full article
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Review

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23 pages, 4352 KiB  
Review
Basic Analytical Modeling of Creep Strain Curves
by Rolf Sandström
Materials 2023, 16(9), 3542; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16093542 - 5 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1682
Abstract
Creep strain versus time curves (creep curves) have traditionally been described with the help of empirical models where a number of adjustable parameters are involved. These models are simple to use, but they cannot be applied for prediction. For understanding the general behavior [...] Read more.
Creep strain versus time curves (creep curves) have traditionally been described with the help of empirical models where a number of adjustable parameters are involved. These models are simple to use, but they cannot be applied for prediction. For understanding the general behavior of primary and tertiary creep, they are still useful. In fact, the phi model can represent primary creep, and the Omega model tertiary creep for a number of materials. However, in recent years, basic analytical models have been formulated that can predict and describe creep strain data without using fitting parameters. In the paper, a review of these models is given. A number of applications of the models are also given. It is demonstrated that the basic models can quantitatively predict observations. They also provide derivations of some empirical findings. Full article
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