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Special Issue "Solid-State Laser Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2016)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Stefano Taccheo

College of Engineering, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Lasers; Solid-state lasers; Fiber-lasers; Supercontinuum sources; Laser materials; Application of lasers to biomedicine and materials processing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the last few decades we have seen the growing impact of laser devices, now one of most important tools to provide better healthcare, faster communication, and foster advanced manufacturing.

However, lasers are based on specific active materials that needs to satisfy several requirements, such as good doping levels, low losses, good thermal dissipation (in bulk), or the possibility of fibre drawing. At present, only a few rare-earth elements, as well as host materials, have been truly developed, permitting lasing mainly in the 1–2 micron wavelength interval. An effort on new materials and new dopants is therefore required to progress in the field. The main focus of the forthcoming “Laser Materials” Special Issue is to present a comprehensive overview of new developments, as well as of open issues and requirement from laser developers. Recent advances in soft glass materials to address the mid-infrared wavelength interval, as well as on new crystal ceramic materials to improve power generation and tunability, are now showing excellent promise. Advances in doped polymer, as well as doped random material, will be also included. Since more and more complex and heavily doped laser systems are under scrutiny, the issue will welcome papers on laser material modelling, as well as on the spectroscopy and characterization of ion–ion interactions.

It is my pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, as well as review papers are all welcome.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Stefano Taccheo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • rare-earth doped material
  • rare-earth doped glasses
  • rare-earth doped crystals
  • laser
  • modelling of laser materials
  • spectroscopy
  • material ageing
  • radiation effect
  • fibre and waveguide fabrication
  • photoluminescence
  • energy-transfer

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effects of Laser Power Level on Microstructural Properties and Phase Composition of Laser-Clad Fluorapatite/Zirconia Composite Coatings on Ti6Al4V Substrates
Materials 2016, 9(5), 380; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma9050380
Received: 28 February 2016 / Revised: 26 April 2016 / Accepted: 11 May 2016 / Published: 17 May 2016
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (10269 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Hydroxyapatite (HA) is one of the most commonly used materials for the coating of bioceramic titanium (Ti) alloys. However, HA has poor mechanical properties and a low bonding strength. Accordingly, the present study replaces HA with a composite coating material consisting of fluorapatite [...] Read more.
Hydroxyapatite (HA) is one of the most commonly used materials for the coating of bioceramic titanium (Ti) alloys. However, HA has poor mechanical properties and a low bonding strength. Accordingly, the present study replaces HA with a composite coating material consisting of fluorapatite (FA) and 20 wt % yttria (3 mol %) stabilized zirconia (ZrO2, 3Y-TZP). The FA/ZrO2 coatings are deposited on Ti6Al4V substrates using a Nd:YAG laser cladding system with laser powers and travel speeds of 400 W/200 mm/min, 800 W/400 mm/min, and 1200 W/600 mm/min, respectively. The experimental results show that a significant inter-diffusion of the alloying elements occurs between the coating layer (CL) and the transition layer (TL). Consequently, a strong metallurgical bond is formed between them. During the cladding process, the ZrO2 is completely decomposed, while the FA is partially decomposed. As a result, the CLs of all the specimens consist mainly of FA, Ca4(PO4)2O (TTCP), CaF2, CaZrO3, CaTiO3 and monoclinic phase ZrO2 (m-ZrO2), together with a small amount of θ-Al2O3. As the laser power is increased, CaO, CaCO3 and trace amounts of tetragonal phase ZrO2 (t-ZrO2) also appear. As the laser power increases from 400 to 800 W, the CL hardness also increases as a result of microstructural refinement and densification. However, at the highest laser power of 1200 W, the CL hardness reduces significantly due to the formation of large amounts of relatively soft CaO and CaCO3 phase. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solid-State Laser Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Random Laser Action in Nd:YAG Crystal Powder
Materials 2016, 9(5), 369; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma9050369
Received: 29 February 2016 / Revised: 11 April 2016 / Accepted: 6 May 2016 / Published: 13 May 2016
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (1536 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This work explores the room temperature random stimulated emission at 1.064 μm of a Nd:YAG crystal powder (Neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet) in a very simple pump configuration with no assistance from an internal mirror. The laser threshold energy as a function of pump [...] Read more.
This work explores the room temperature random stimulated emission at 1.064 μm of a Nd:YAG crystal powder (Neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet) in a very simple pump configuration with no assistance from an internal mirror. The laser threshold energy as a function of pump beam area and pump wavelength has been measured, as well as the temporal dynamics of emission pulses. The absolute energy of stimulated emission and the absolute laser slope efficiency have been measured by using a method proposed by the authors. The results show a surprising high efficiency that takes the low Nd3+ ion concentration of the crystal powder into account. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solid-State Laser Materials)
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Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Influence of Upconversion Processes in the Optically-Induced Inhomogeneous Thermal Behavior of Erbium-Doped Lanthanum Oxysulfide Powders
Materials 2016, 9(5), 353; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma9050353
Received: 29 February 2016 / Revised: 12 April 2016 / Accepted: 5 May 2016 / Published: 11 May 2016
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (2798 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The efficient infrared-to-visible upconversion emission present in Er-doped lanthanum oxysulfide crystal powders is used as a fine thermal sensor to determine the influence of upconversion processes on the laser-induced thermal load produced by the pump laser and to assess the potentialities of this [...] Read more.
The efficient infrared-to-visible upconversion emission present in Er-doped lanthanum oxysulfide crystal powders is used as a fine thermal sensor to determine the influence of upconversion processes on the laser-induced thermal load produced by the pump laser and to assess the potentialities of this material in order to obtain anti-Stokes laser-induced cooling. The analysis of the upconversion emission and excitation spectra as well as the decay curves indicates that energy transfer upconversion is the main mechanism responsible for the green (4S3/2) and red (4F9/2) upconversion luminescence. The dependence on temperature of the intensity ratio of upconversion emission from thermally-coupled 2H11/2 and 4S3/2 levels of Er3+ in the 240–300 K temperature range has been used to estimate a relative sensitivity of 1.09 × 10−2 K−1. Thermal measurements performed on the powder samples by using a thermal infrared camera exhibit a very inhomogeneous heat distribution at the sample surface due to the random distribution of the pumping energy inside the sample as well as to the random properties of the thermal field. The analysis of both spectroscopic and thermal measurements show that after a transient heating induced by the background absorption, cooling of discrete regions by means of anti-Stokes processes can be observed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solid-State Laser Materials)
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Figure 1

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