Special Issue "Recent Advances in the Risk Assessment and Management of Nanomaterials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Danail Hristozov
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Universita Ca' Foscari Venezia, Venice, Italy
Interests: material characterization; nanomaterials; biomaterials; nanoparticles; nanotechnology; nanobiotechnology; risk assessment; nanochemistry; nanomedicine; bionanotechnology
Prof. Dr. Helinor Johnston
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, Biophysics and Bioengineering, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Interests: biological chemistry; biophysics and bioengineering; nanomaterials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanotechnology is one of the key emerging technologies identified in the European Union’s 2020 Strategy. It has huge potential to contribute to innovation and economic growth, and therefore fosters large investments in developing new products. However, current uncertainties around the Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) risks of manufactured nanomaterials are raising societal concerns about the adequacy of their regulation. Failure to effectively assess the risks posed by nanomaterials may reduce the benefits from nanotechnology. The need to resolve these uncertainties has resulted in over a decade of targeted research to gain knowledge on the intrinsic and extrinsic physicochemical identity of nanomaterials, their release and exposure potential, (eco)toxicological effects, nano-bio interactions, modes of action and adverse outcome pathways, in order to assess their risks and develop adequate risk management/governance strategies, including, for example, safety by design. The field of nanotoxicology has grown enormously from a methodological perspective, and is extremely interdisciplinary; with contributions from materials science, chemistry, environmental science, toxicology, statistics and informatics now commonplace in the nanoEHS literature. As a result, the time is ripe for looking at where we are now and trying to establish where the field should go in the future—this is the goal of this Special Issue.

Dr. Danail Hristozov
Prof. Dr. Helinor Johnston
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanomaterials
  • nanosafety
  • health and environmental risks
  • risk assessment
  • nanotoxicology
  • nano-bio interactions
  • hazard assessment
  • exposure assessment
  • safety by design
  • adverse outcome pathway
  • risk management
  • risk governance

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Bacterial Adhesion on Femtosecond Laser-Modified Polyethylene
Materials 2019, 12(19), 3107; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12193107 - 24 Sep 2019
Abstract
In this study, femtosecond laser-induced sub-micrometer structures are generated to modify polyethylene (PE) surface topographies. These surfaces were subjected to bacterial colonization studies with Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus as test strains. The results reveal that the nanostructures do not influence S. aureus [...] Read more.
In this study, femtosecond laser-induced sub-micrometer structures are generated to modify polyethylene (PE) surface topographies. These surfaces were subjected to bacterial colonization studies with Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus as test strains. The results reveal that the nanostructures do not influence S. aureus coverage, while the adhesion of E. coli is reduced. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Mobility and Fate of Cerium Dioxide, Zinc Oxide, and Copper Nanoparticles in Agricultural Soil at Sequential Wetting-Drying Cycles
Materials 2019, 12(8), 1270; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12081270 - 18 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Study on the behavior and fate of nanofertilizers in soil plays a key role in the assessment of the efficiency of their use for intended purposes. The behavior of nanoparticles (NPs) in soil depends on environmental scenarios, such as Wetting-Drying cycles (WDCs). In [...] Read more.
Study on the behavior and fate of nanofertilizers in soil plays a key role in the assessment of the efficiency of their use for intended purposes. The behavior of nanoparticles (NPs) in soil depends on environmental scenarios, such as Wetting-Drying cycles (WDCs). In the present work, the mobility and fate of CeO2, ZnO, and Cu NPs in agricultural soil at sequential WDCs have been studied. It has been shown that the mobility of CeO2 and ZnO NPs decreases after each WDC. After four WDCs the relative amount of CeO2 and ZnO NPs leached from soil decreases from 0.11 to 0.07% and from 0.21 to 0.07%, correspondingly. The decrease in the mobility of NPs is caused by their immobilization by water-stable soil aggregates, which are formed at sequential WDCs. Cu NPs are dissolved by soil solution, so their mobility (in ionic forms) increases after each subsequent WDCs. The relative content of Cu2+ sourced from Cu NPs increases up to 0.88% after four WDCs. It has been found that mineral NPs of soil can play an important role in the transport of insoluble engineered NPs. As for soluble NPs, the kinetics of their dissolution governs their mobility in ionic forms. Full article
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