Special Issue "Novel Pathways to Process and Harness Porous Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Porous Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Victor Malgras
Website
Guest Editor
National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), International Center for Young Scientists (ICYS), Japan
Interests: nanocrystals; mesoporous; nanocomposites; optoelectronics; photovoltaics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Naturally occurring porous materials have found useful applications since the beginning of civilization. We are now able to design and fabricate such structures synthetically, usually through bottom-up engineering, and take advantage of their unique properties to meet our ceaselessly increasing demand for technological innovation. Materials such as polymers, carbons, oxides, aerogels, or metals are already available in a wide range of structural porosities, from micro- to macroporous, and in various geometries. Their skeletal matrix makes them lightweight, while their internal surface area can reach up to square kilometres per gram. This opens the door to fascinating applications which can exploit large interfaces, including adsorption (decontamination), catalysis, electrodes for energy storage systems, drug delivery, etc.

However, there are many unexplored aspects of this technology which require the attention of the scientific community. Traditional synthetic methods such as dealloying, anodization, gas eutectic transformation, as well as soft- and hard-templating have been mastered over the years. Nevertheless, it is necessary to investigate and develop new approaches to expand the synthesis of porous materials to compounds that have historically been more difficult to assemble (e.g., semiconductors, multicomponents) and to improve our control of the structure of traditional porous compounds (e.g., pore size distribution, ordering, orientation, periodicity). Another area requiring improvement is our lack of control over the crystallinity of mesoporous materials synthesized through soft-templating approach, since the integrity of the architecture is usually jeopardized by typical annealing methods. Finally, it is important to rejuvenate the interest in applications which do not target directly the surface area of the porous materials, used as-prepared or in a composite form. Examples are optics (non-linear optics, photonic crystals, meta-materials), thermoelectrics, pore size-dependent sensing, microfluidics, etc.

This Special Issue is focused on innovative routes to the synthesis micro-, meso-, and macroporous materials, as well as pioneering and/or exotic approaches to harnessing their properties, directly (as-prepared) or indirectly (composites). Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Novel strategies to fabricate zeolites, zeotypes, micro-, meso-, and macroporous materials, or ways to improve traditional synthetic approaches;
  • Innovative porous materials-based composites (inorganic, organic, hybrids), addressing pore-filling;
  • Exotic porous materials (semiconductors, binary, ternary, quaternary);
  • Exotic architectures for traditional compounds (high degree of ordering, orientation, periodicity);
  • Addressing crystallinity in porous materials;
  • New insights into the properties of porous materials;
  • Use of porous materials in optical applications (non-linear optics, photonic crystals, meta-materials, surface-enhanced Raman scattering);
  • Use of porous materials in thermoelectric applications;
  • Use of porous materials in sensing applications;
  • Use of porous materials in microfluidic applications;

Dr. Victor Malgras
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • porous
  • mesoporous
  • macroporous
  • microporous

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Optimum Bloating-Activation Zone of Artificial Lightweight Aggregate by Dynamic Parameters
Materials 2019, 12(2), 267; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12020267 - 15 Jan 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to compare the bloating mechanism of artificial lightweight aggregate under sintering and rapid sintering conditions to identify the factors behind the bloating of the lightweight aggregate under these sintering conditions, and to find suitable temperature ramping conditions. [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study is to compare the bloating mechanism of artificial lightweight aggregate under sintering and rapid sintering conditions to identify the factors behind the bloating of the lightweight aggregate under these sintering conditions, and to find suitable temperature ramping conditions. The aggregate had an average particle size of 10 mm as formed using acid clay, and it was fired by a rapid sintering method and a normal sintering method. The bulk density and water absorption ratio of the specimen were measured, and the cross section was observed. No black core was observed under the rapid sintering condition, and it was lightened at an inflection point of 1150 °C. A reduction in the bulk density was observed in a shorter period of time when the input temperature was high under the normal sintering conditions. Regardless of the input temperature, the bulk density change was divided into three sections and a bloating-activation zone was observed in which the density abruptly decreased. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Pathways to Process and Harness Porous Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Role of Wood Fibers in Tuning Dynamic Rheology, Non-Isothermal Crystallization, and Microcellular Structure of Polypropylene Foams
Materials 2019, 12(1), 106; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12010106 - 30 Dec 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Microcellular polypropylene (PP)/wood fiber composite foams were fabricated via batch foaming assisted by supercritical CO2 (scCO2). Effects of wood fibers on rheology, crystallization, and foaming behaviors of PP were comprehensively investigated. The obtained results showed that the incorporation of wood [...] Read more.
Microcellular polypropylene (PP)/wood fiber composite foams were fabricated via batch foaming assisted by supercritical CO2 (scCO2). Effects of wood fibers on rheology, crystallization, and foaming behaviors of PP were comprehensively investigated. The obtained results showed that the incorporation of wood fibers increased the complex viscosity and the storage modulus of the PP matrix. Jeziorny’s model for non-isothermal crystallization kinetics indicated that wood fibers did not change the crystal growth. However, the crystallization rate of the PP matrix was decreased to a certain extent with increasing wood fiber loadings. The wood fiber exerts a noticeable role in improving the cell density and reducing the cell size, despite decreasing the expansion ratio. Interestingly, a “small-sized cells to large-sized cells” gradient cell structure was found around the wood fibers, implying cell nucleation was induced at the interface between wood fiber and PP matrix. When wood fiber loadings were specifically increased, a desirable microcellular structure was obtained. However, further increasing the wood fiber loadings deteriorated the cell structure. Moreover, the crystallinity of the composite foams initially decreased and then slightly increased with increasing wood fiber loadings, while the crystal size decreased. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Pathways to Process and Harness Porous Materials)
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