materials-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Advances in Porous Anodic Oxides from Biomaterials to Sensing and Energy

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 June 2022) | Viewed by 4083

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physics, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy
Interests: anodic oxides; biomaterials; biofunctionalization; self-assembled monolayers; oligonucleotide films; scanning probe microscopy; spectroscopic ellipsometry; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Military University of Technology, Warsaw, Poland
2. Institute for Globally Distributed Open Research and Education (IGDORE), Göteborg, Sweden
Interests: scanning probe microscopy; nanocomposites; nanoporous oxides of valve metals; applications of anodic porous alumina; SERS; biocompatibility of materials; nanoindentation; dental restorative materials and implants
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years the use of anodization as a means of nanopatterning valve metal surfaces has been extended in the range of treated metals, moving from the standard aluminium substrates and relatively common titanium ones to more unusual metals such as zirconium, tantalum, niobium, and hafnium. Even alloys of these or other metals, including copper, tin, and zinc, have been used in the attempt to modulate the resulting properties of the porous surface coating. The applications of the micro-nanoporous surfaces resulting from anodization are diverse: from optical ones, where the ordering of pores positions or at least their monodispersity in size are critical to give rise to diffraction or cavity effects for photonic crystals and sensors or for distributed feedback lasers, respectively; to drug delivery, where the response to diffusion in/out of the pores is critical; to scaffolds and/or permanent implants in orthopaedic or dental fields, where functionalization of the pore wall surfaces and even structure interiors is key to provide the best possible biocompatibility and bioactivity; on to visible-light-sensitive photocatalysts, after doping the oxide layer. Sensing applications could be based on the SERS effect or interference in reflectance/transmittance spectroscopy. The expansion of the use of porous oxides as templates for the lithographic fabrication of advanced materials in still other possible areas (e.g., catalysis, separation, energy) will be additionally considered.

This Special Issue would like to collect contributions from all these diverse areas, especially pointing to use of new metals to be oxidized, in order to provide a picture of the current state-of-the-art in the field. Manuscripts on the fabrication, characterization, and applications of the structured materials surfaces—in the form of both coatings and membranes—will be welcome.

The relevant topics include but are not limited to those listed under the Keywords section below.

Dr. Ornella Cavalleri
Dr. Marco Salerno
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • functional metal coatings
  • self-organization
  • valve metals
  • intermetallic alloys
  • nanopatterning
  • natural lithography
  • templates and moulding
  • hierarchical material structuring
  • biocompatibility
  • bioactivity
  • pore loading and elution
  • orthopaedic implants
  • dental implants
  • optical properties after nanostructuring
  • photocatalytic properties of anodic oxides
  • energy storage
  • diffusion in porous solids
  • modelling of growth
  • modelling of diffusion through pores
  • modelling of mechanical properties

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

11 pages, 4143 KiB  
Article
A Two-Step Approach to Tune the Micro and Nanoscale Morphology of Porous Niobium Oxide to Promote Osteointegration
by Paolo Canepa, Giuseppe Firpo, Elena Gatta, Roberto Spotorno, Paolo Giannoni, Rodolfo Quarto, Maurizio Canepa and Ornella Cavalleri
Materials 2022, 15(2), 473; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma15020473 - 8 Jan 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1319
Abstract
We present a two-step surface modification process to tailor the micro and nano morphology of niobium oxide layers. Niobium was firstly anodized in spark regime in a Ca- and P-containing solution and subsequently treated by acid etching. The effects of anodizing time and [...] Read more.
We present a two-step surface modification process to tailor the micro and nano morphology of niobium oxide layers. Niobium was firstly anodized in spark regime in a Ca- and P-containing solution and subsequently treated by acid etching. The effects of anodizing time and applied potential on the surface morphology is investigated with SEM and AFM, complemented by XPS compositional analysis. Anodizing with a limiting potential of 250 V results in the fast growth of oxide layers with a homogeneous distribution of micro-sized pores. Cracks are, however, observed on 250 V grown layers. Limiting the anodizing potential to 200 V slows down the oxide growth, increasing the anodizing time needed to achieve a uniform pore coverage but produces fracture-free oxide layers. The surface nano morphology is further tuned by a subsequent acid etching process that leads to the formation of nano-sized pits on the anodically grown oxide surface. In vitro tests show that the etching-induced nanostructure effectively promotes cell adhesion and spreading onto the niobium oxide surface. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 2316 KiB  
Article
Anodizing of Hydrogenated Titanium and Zirconium Films
by Alexander Poznyak, Andrei Pligovka and Marco Salerno
Materials 2021, 14(24), 7490; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14247490 - 7 Dec 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2321
Abstract
Magnetron-sputtered thin films of titanium and zirconium, with a thickness of 150 nm, were hydrogenated at atmospheric pressure and a temperature of 703 K, then anodized in boric, oxalic, and tartaric acid aqueous solutions, in potentiostatic, galvanostatic, potentiodynamic, and combined modes. A study [...] Read more.
Magnetron-sputtered thin films of titanium and zirconium, with a thickness of 150 nm, were hydrogenated at atmospheric pressure and a temperature of 703 K, then anodized in boric, oxalic, and tartaric acid aqueous solutions, in potentiostatic, galvanostatic, potentiodynamic, and combined modes. A study of the thickness distribution of the elements in fully anodized hydrogenated zirconium samples, using Auger electron spectroscopy, indicates the formation of zirconia. The voltage- and current-time responses of hydrogenated titanium anodizing were investigated. In this work, fundamental possibility and some process features of anodizing hydrogenated metals were demonstrated. In the case of potentiodynamic anodizing at 0.6 M tartaric acid, the increase in titanium hydrogenation time, from 30 to 90 min, leads to a decrease in the charge of the oxidizing hydrogenated metal at an anodic voltage sweep rate of 0.2 V·s−1. An anodic voltage sweep rate in the range of 0.05–0.5 V·s−1, with a hydrogenation time of 60 min, increases the anodizing efficiency (charge reduction for the complete oxidation of the hydrogenated metal). The detected radical differences in the time responses and decreased efficiency of the anodic process during the anodizing of the hydrogenated thin films, compared to pure metals, are explained by the presence of hydrogen in the composition of the samples and the increased contribution of side processes, due to the possible features of the formed oxide morphologies. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop