Special Issue "Advanced nanostructures for Photonics and Photovoltaics"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Dragan Indjin
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Guest Editor
Reader (Associate Professor) in Optoelectronics and Nanoscale Electronics, Pollard Institute, School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds, Woodhouse Lane, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK
Interests: optical absorption; semiconductor lasers; mid-infrared and terahertz lasers and detectors; quantum-cascade lasers; infrared and terahertz sensing and imaging
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Jelena Radovanovic
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Guest Editor
Department of Microelectronics and Engineering Physics, School of Electrical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Belgrade,Serbia
Interests: quantum cascade structures; global optimization; modelling; semiconductor metamaterials; ultrafast nonlinear optics
Dr. James P. Connolly
Website
Guest Editor
IPVF, Institut Photovoltaïque d’Île-de-France, 91120 Palaiseau, France
Interests: multiscale; photovoltaics; modelling; advanced characterization

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Semiconductor nanostructured devices are reaching their maturity. Photonic devices, based on semiconductor heterostructures, such as quantum wells, superlattices, quantum dots and wires, quantum-cascade lasers and infrared photo-detectors, as well as their real-life applications, are attracting a great deal of interest, both in research and in commercial arena. Moreover, the field of nanostructures in solar cells is a dynamic one, using a wide array of tools, from restricted degrees of freedom, to structural anisotropies, to manipulate carrier transport and light interaction, in new and improved ways. The first of these structures, proposed in the 1980s, was the quantum well solar cell, which led, inevitably, to the quantum wire and quantum dot concepts. These structures opened up new directions in physics with regards to tackling thermalization losses, such as the intermediate band solar cell and the hot carrier solar cell, as well as concepts aiming to optimize light interaction and spectral conversion, such as multiple exciton generation approaches in nanostructures. This Special Issue focuses on these cutting-edge topics by inviting both review articles and original research contributions in the field of nanostructures for innovative approaches in photonics and photovoltaics.

Dr. Dragan Indjin
Prof. Jelena Radovanovic
Dr. James P. Connolly
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • quantum wells
  • quantum wires
  • quantum dots
  • quantum-cascade
  • infrared and terahertz
  • intersubband transitions
  • absorption and transmission
  • tunneling times
  • nonlinear optical effects
  • intermediate band
  • multi junction
  • multiple exciton generation
  • hot carrier
  • spectral conversion
  • light interaction

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Metal Oxide Thin-Film Heterojunctions for Photovoltaic Applications
Materials 2018, 11(12), 2593; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11122593 - 19 Dec 2018
Cited by 5
Abstract
Silicon-based tandem solar cells incorporating low-cost, abundant, and non-toxic metal oxide materials can increase the conversion efficiency of silicon solar cells beyond their conventional limitations with obvious economic and environmental benefits. In this work, the electrical characteristics of a metal oxide thin-film heterojunction [...] Read more.
Silicon-based tandem solar cells incorporating low-cost, abundant, and non-toxic metal oxide materials can increase the conversion efficiency of silicon solar cells beyond their conventional limitations with obvious economic and environmental benefits. In this work, the electrical characteristics of a metal oxide thin-film heterojunction solar cell based on a cuprous oxide (Cu2O) absorber layer were investigated. Highly Al-doped n-type ZnO (AZO) and undoped p-type Cu2O thin films were prepared on quartz substrates by magnetron sputter deposition. The electrical and optical properties of these thin films were determined from Hall effect measurements and spectroscopic ellipsometry. After annealing the Cu2O film at 900 °C, the majority carrier (hole) mobility and the resistivity were measured at 50 cm2/V·s and 200 Ω·cm, respectively. Numerical modeling was carried out to investigate the effect of band alignment and interface defects on the electrical characteristics of the AZO/Cu2O heterojunction. The analysis suggests that the incorporation of a buffer layer can enhance the performance of the heterojunction solar cell as a result of reduced conduction band offset. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced nanostructures for Photonics and Photovoltaics)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Dynamics of Frenkel Excitons in Pentacene
Materials 2018, 11(11), 2219; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11112219 - 08 Nov 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
The dispersion relation for noninteracting excitons and the influence of perturbative corrections are examined in the case of pentacene structure. The values of exchange integrals are determined by nonlinear fits to the experimental dispersion data, obtained by the inelastic electron scattering reported in [...] Read more.
The dispersion relation for noninteracting excitons and the influence of perturbative corrections are examined in the case of pentacene structure. The values of exchange integrals are determined by nonlinear fits to the experimental dispersion data, obtained by the inelastic electron scattering reported in recent experiments. We obtain theoretical dispersion curves along four different directions in the Brillouin zone which possess the same periodicity as the experimental data. We also show that perturbative corrections are negligible since the exciton gap in the dispersion relation is huge in comparison to the exchange integrals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced nanostructures for Photonics and Photovoltaics)
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Open AccessArticle
Microscopic Electron Dynamics in Metal Nanoparticles for Photovoltaic Systems
Materials 2018, 11(7), 1077; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11071077 - 25 Jun 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Nanoparticles—regularly patterned or randomly dispersed—are a key ingredient for emerging technologies in photonics. Of particular interest are scattering and field enhancement effects of metal nanoparticles for energy harvesting and converting systems. An often neglected aspect in the modeling of nanoparticles are light interaction [...] Read more.
Nanoparticles—regularly patterned or randomly dispersed—are a key ingredient for emerging technologies in photonics. Of particular interest are scattering and field enhancement effects of metal nanoparticles for energy harvesting and converting systems. An often neglected aspect in the modeling of nanoparticles are light interaction effects at the ultimate nanoscale beyond classical electrodynamics. Those arise from microscopic electron dynamics in confined systems, the accelerated motion in the plasmon oscillation and the quantum nature of the free electron gas in metals, such as Coulomb repulsion and electron diffusion. We give a detailed account on free electron phenomena in metal nanoparticles and discuss analytic expressions stemming from microscopic (Random Phase Approximation—RPA) and semi-classical (hydrodynamic) theories. These can be incorporated into standard computational schemes to produce more reliable results on the optical properties of metal nanoparticles. We combine these solutions into a single framework and study systematically their joint impact on isolated Au, Ag, and Al nanoparticles as well as dimer structures. The spectral position of the plasmon resonance and its broadening as well as local field enhancement show an intriguing dependence on the particle size due to the relevance of additional damping channels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced nanostructures for Photonics and Photovoltaics)
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