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Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (21 February 2021) | Viewed by 38048

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, University Politehnica of Bucharest, RO-011061 Bucharest, Romania
2. Lasers Department, National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, RO-077125 Magurele, Romania
Interests: materials science and engineering; (micro-/nano-)biomaterials; biomedical devices; laser processing of (bio)materials; bioactive coatings; applied chemistry and chemical engineering; therapeutic (micro-/nano-)biomaterials; biomedicine and life sciences
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary knowledge from modern nanobiotechnologies has contributed to the impressive development of genuine nanosized and nanostructured biomaterials and biocompatible platforms. These nanomaterials have improved biocompatibility and mostly utilize environmentally-friendly technologies for the development of novel materials for biomedical use.

Recently developed nanomaterials exhibit attractive physicochemical properties, possess versatile and tunable functionality, and have proved to be suitable and performance-enhanced candidates as bioactive nanocoatings for improved implantable and exploratory devices, nanoplatforms for specific and selective detection and imaging, nanostructures for tissue restauration and regeneration, and as nanosystems for controlled, targeted, and circumstantially triggered drug delivery.

Depending on the preparation method, the therapeutic substance (naturally derived or synthetic drug) is either physically entrapped in or covalently bound to the matrix of the pharmaceutical nanosystem. The resulting compounds may have the structure of capsules (nanoparticles or nanostructured microspheres), amphiphilic core/shell structures (micelles or liposomes), or hyperbranched macromolecules.

Within this Special Issue “Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery”, we invite members of academic and scientific communities to contribute their latest findings on nanosized and nanostructured biomaterials intended for new pharmaceutically-active formulations. We are especially looking for relevant studies and reports on organic macromolecules (natural and synthetic polymers, membranes and films, scaffolds and gels), carbonaceous materials (single and multiwalled carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, graphene and graphene oxide), oxides (nanoparticles, micro- and mesoporous materials), metal nanostructures (noble metal nanoparticles, quantum dots), and composite materials.

Dr. Eng. Valentina Grumezescu
Dr. Eng. Oana Gherasim
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • surface engineering and functionalization
  • bioactive and therapeutic nanomaterials
  • natural and synthetic biomaterials in drug delivery
  • inorganic and organic biomaterials in drug delivery
  • composite and hybrid drug delivery formulations
  • pharmacologically-active formulations
  • pharmacotherapy and pharmacognosy
  • targeted and triggered drug delivery

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 4330 KiB  
Article
Spicy Bitumen: Curcumin Effects on the Rheological and Adhesion Properties of Asphalt
by Abraham A. Abe, Cesare Oliviero Rossi, Paolino Caputo, Maria Penelope De Santo, Nicolas Godbert and Iolinda Aiello
Materials 2021, 14(7), 1622; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14071622 - 26 Mar 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2342
Abstract
Over the years, the need for the synthesis of biodegradable materials has facilitated the drift of the asphalt industry towards eco-sustainable and cost-effective production of road pavements. The principal additives in the asphalt industry to improve the performance of road pavements and increase [...] Read more.
Over the years, the need for the synthesis of biodegradable materials has facilitated the drift of the asphalt industry towards eco-sustainable and cost-effective production of road pavements. The principal additives in the asphalt industry to improve the performance of road pavements and increase its lifespan are majorly rheological modifiers, adhesion promoters and anti-oxidant agents. Rheological modifiers increase physico-chemical properties such as transition temperature of asphalt binder (bitumen), adhesion promoters increase the affinity between binder and stone aggregates while anti-oxidant agents reduce the effects of oxidation caused by exposure to air, water and other natural elements during the production of asphalt pavements. In this study, we tested the effectiveness of a food grade bio-additive on these three aforementioned properties. We also sought to hypothesize the mechanisms by which the additive confers these desired features on bitumen. We present this study to evaluate the effects of turmeric, a food-based additive, on bitumen. The study was conducted through dynamic shear rheology (DSR), atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and boiling test analysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery)
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18 pages, 11869 KiB  
Article
MAPLE Coatings Embedded with Essential Oil-Conjugated Magnetite for Anti-Biofilm Applications
by Oana Gherasim, Roxana Cristina Popescu, Valentina Grumezescu, George Dan Mogoșanu, Laurențiu Mogoantă, Florin Iordache, Alina Maria Holban, Bogdan Ștefan Vasile, Alexandra Cătălina Bîrcă, Ovidiu-Cristian Oprea, Alexandru Mihai Grumezescu and Ecaterina Andronescu
Materials 2021, 14(7), 1612; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14071612 - 25 Mar 2021
Cited by 32 | Viewed by 3018
Abstract
The present study reports on the development and evaluation of nanostructured composite coatings of polylactic acid (PLA) embedded with iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4) modified with Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus) essential oil. The co-precipitation method was employed to synthesize [...] Read more.
The present study reports on the development and evaluation of nanostructured composite coatings of polylactic acid (PLA) embedded with iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4) modified with Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus) essential oil. The co-precipitation method was employed to synthesize the magnetite particles conjugated with Eucalyptus natural antibiotic (Fe3O4@EG), while their composition and microstructure were investigated using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) technique was further employed to obtain PLA/Fe3O4@EG thin films. Optimal experimental conditions for laser processing were established by complementary infrared microscopy (IRM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigations. The in vitro biocompatibility with eukaryote cells was proven using mesenchymal stem cells, while the anti-biofilm efficiency of composite PLA/Fe3O4@EG coatings was assessed against Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery)
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11 pages, 1697 KiB  
Article
Development of Sustained-Release Ophthalmic Formulation Based on Tranilast Solid Nanoparticles
by Misa Minami, Ryotaro Seiriki, Hiroko Otake, Yosuke Nakazawa, Kazutaka Kanai, Tadatoshi Tanino and Noriaki Nagai
Materials 2020, 13(7), 1675; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13071675 - 3 Apr 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2473
Abstract
Eye drops containing Tranilast (TL), N-(3,4-dimethoxycinnamoyl) anthramilic acid, are used as an anti-allergic conjunctivitis drug in the ophthalmic field. Traditional eye drops are very patient compliant, although the bioavailability (BA) of most eye drops is low since eye drops cannot be [...] Read more.
Eye drops containing Tranilast (TL), N-(3,4-dimethoxycinnamoyl) anthramilic acid, are used as an anti-allergic conjunctivitis drug in the ophthalmic field. Traditional eye drops are very patient compliant, although the bioavailability (BA) of most eye drops is low since eye drops cannot be instilled beyond the capacity of the conjunctival sac due to its limited volume. Thus, traditional eye drops have low BA and a short duration of the drug on the ocular surface, so solutions to these problems are highly anticipated. In this study, we designed a sustained-release drug-delivery system (DDS) for TL nanoparticles. TL nanoparticles were prepared by bead mill treatment, and the gel formulations containing TL nanoparticles (TL-NPs-Gel, particle size 50 nm–100 nm) were provided by carboxypolymethylene. The crystal structure of TL with and without bead mill treatment is the same, but the TL solubility in formulations containing nanoparticles was 5.3-fold higher compared with gel formulations containing TL microparticles (TL-MPs-Gel). The photo and thermal stabilities of TL-NPs-Gel are also higher than those of dissolved TL. Moreover, when TL-NPs-Gel is applied to the upper eyelid skin (outside), the TL is released as nanoparticles, and delivered to the lacrimal fluid through the meibomian glands. In addition, the TL release profile for TL-NPs-Gel was sustained over 180 min after the treatment. These findings can be used to develop a sustained-release DDS in the ophthalmic field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery)
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Review

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23 pages, 1413 KiB  
Review
Current Landscape in Organic Nanosized Materials Advances for Improved Management of Colorectal Cancer Patients
by Octav Ginghină, Ariana Hudiță, Cătălin Zaharia, Aristidis Tsatsakis, Yaroslav Mezhuev, Marieta Costache and Bianca Gălățeanu
Materials 2021, 14(9), 2440; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14092440 - 8 May 2021
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 3848
Abstract
Globally, colorectal cancer (CRC) ranks as one of the most prevalent types of cancers at the moment, being the second cause of cancer-related deaths. The CRC chemotherapy backbone is represented by 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and their combinations, but their administration presents several serious [...] Read more.
Globally, colorectal cancer (CRC) ranks as one of the most prevalent types of cancers at the moment, being the second cause of cancer-related deaths. The CRC chemotherapy backbone is represented by 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and their combinations, but their administration presents several serious disadvantages, such as poor bioavailability, lack of tumor specificity, and susceptibility to multidrug resistance. To address these limitations, nanomedicine has arisen as a powerful tool to improve current chemotherapy since nanosized carriers hold great promise in improving the stability and solubility of the drug payload and enhancing the active concentration of the drug that reaches the tumor tissue, increasing, therefore, the safety and efficacy of the treatment. In this context, the present review offers an overview of the most recent advances in the development of nanosized drug-delivery systems as smart therapeutic tools in CRC management and highlights the emerging need for improving the existing in vitro cancer models to reduce animal testing and increase the success of nanomedicine in clinical trials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery)
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20 pages, 11589 KiB  
Review
Essential Oils for Bone Repair and Regeneration—Mechanisms and Applications
by Cristina Chircov, Ion Iulian Miclea, Valentina Grumezescu and Alexandru Mihai Grumezescu
Materials 2021, 14(8), 1867; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14081867 - 9 Apr 2021
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 4704
Abstract
Although bone possesses a remarkable capacity for self-remodeling and self-healing of small defects, the continuously increasing growth of bone diseases in the elderly population is becoming a significant burden, affecting individual life quality and society. Conventional treatment options involve surgical procedures for repair [...] Read more.
Although bone possesses a remarkable capacity for self-remodeling and self-healing of small defects, the continuously increasing growth of bone diseases in the elderly population is becoming a significant burden, affecting individual life quality and society. Conventional treatment options involve surgical procedures for repair and reconstruction, local debridement, autografts or allografts, bone transport, Masquelet’s two-stage reconstructions, and vascularized bone transplants. However, as such approaches often lead to disruptions of bone-regeneration processes and microbial contaminations and are often inefficient, researchers focus on developing bone-regenerative strategies and identifying novel therapeutic agents that could aid the bone-healing process. In this regard, plant-derived biocompounds, especially essential oils (EOs), have received great scientific attention in recent years, owing to their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial effects. Current studies focus on either the direct application of EOs on bone tissue or the introduction of EOs as bioactive compounds in bone scaffolds or as coatings for bone implants. Some of the EOs investigated involve St. John’s wort, rosemary, thyme, ylang, white poplar, eucalyptus, lavender, and grape seed. In this context, the present paper aims to provide an overview of the main mechanisms involved in bone repair and regeneration and the potential of EOs to address and enhance these mechanisms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery)
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20 pages, 5017 KiB  
Review
Phototherapy Combined with Carbon Nanomaterials (1D and 2D) and Their Applications in Cancer Therapy
by Prabhavathi Sundaram and Heidi Abrahamse
Materials 2020, 13(21), 4830; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13214830 - 28 Oct 2020
Cited by 29 | Viewed by 3328
Abstract
Carbon-based materials have attracted research interest worldwide due to their physical and chemical properties and wide surface area, rendering them excellent carrier molecules. They are widely used in biological applications like antimicrobial activity, cancer diagnosis, bio-imaging, targeting, drug delivery, biosensors, tissue engineering, dental [...] Read more.
Carbon-based materials have attracted research interest worldwide due to their physical and chemical properties and wide surface area, rendering them excellent carrier molecules. They are widely used in biological applications like antimicrobial activity, cancer diagnosis, bio-imaging, targeting, drug delivery, biosensors, tissue engineering, dental care, and skin care. Carbon-based nanomaterials like carbon nanotubes and graphene have drawn more attention in the field of phototherapy due to their unique properties such as thermal conductivity, large surface area, and electrical properties. Phototherapy is a promising next-generation therapeutic modality for many modern medical conditions that include cancer diagnosis, targeting, and treatment. Phototherapy involves the major administration of photosensitizers (PSs), which absorb light sources and emit reactive oxygen species under cellular environments. Several types of nontoxic PSs are functionalized on carbon-based nanomaterials and have numerous advantages in cancer therapy. In this review, we discuss the potential role and combined effect of phototherapy and carbon nanomaterials, the mechanism and functionalization of PSs on nanomaterials, and their promising advantages in cancer therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery)
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26 pages, 2714 KiB  
Review
Hydrogel Dressings for the Treatment of Burn Wounds: An Up-To-Date Overview
by Alexandra Elena Stoica, Cristina Chircov and Alexandru Mihai Grumezescu
Materials 2020, 13(12), 2853; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13122853 - 25 Jun 2020
Cited by 96 | Viewed by 16578
Abstract
Globally, the fourth most prevalent devastating form of trauma are burn injuries. Ideal burn wound dressings are fundamental to facilitate the wound healing process and decrease pain in lower time intervals. Conventional dry dressing treatments, such as those using absorbent gauze and/or absorbent [...] Read more.
Globally, the fourth most prevalent devastating form of trauma are burn injuries. Ideal burn wound dressings are fundamental to facilitate the wound healing process and decrease pain in lower time intervals. Conventional dry dressing treatments, such as those using absorbent gauze and/or absorbent cotton, possess limited therapeutic effects and require repeated dressing changes, which further aggravate patients’ suffering. Contrariwise, hydrogels represent a promising alternative to improve healing by assuring a moisture balance at the burn site. Most studies consider hydrogels as ideal candidate materials for the synthesis of wound dressings because they exhibit a three-dimensional (3D) structure, which mimics the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) of skin in regard to the high-water amount, which assures a moist environment to the wound. There is a wide variety of polymers that have been used, either alone or blended, for the fabrication of hydrogels designed for biomedical applications focusing on treating burn injuries. The aim of this paper is to provide an up-to-date overview of hydrogels applied in burn wound dressings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery)
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