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Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Metals and Alloys

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Metals and Alloys".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 June 2023) | Viewed by 3723

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Bodva Industry and Innovation Cluster (BIIC), Budulov 174,04501 Moldava nad Bodvou, Kosice, Slovakia
Interests: plastic deformation; materials properties; microstructures; ultrafine-grained structures; nanostructures; additive manufacturing; cryorolling
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Current trends in research surrounding the mechanical properties of materials are primarily focused on controlling microstructures with micro–nanoscale dimensionalities. Generally, approaches to controlling these structures are based on top–down and bottom–up schemes.

Top–down methods involve inducing structural changes through hot plastic deformations in the monophase region, causing spontaneous braking recrystallization; these approaches are also used for multiphase structures. Plastic deformations are followed by a controlled cooling strategy which is used to control phase transformations. Plastic deformations can be performed using classical methods (rolling, forging, and extrusion) as well as severe plastic deformations (SPD) (hot ECAP and hot ECAR, etc.). The top–down regimes can be followed by heat treatments.

Bottom–up methods are based on the formation of structures using classical or SPD cold plastic deformations, which can also be followed by heat treatments.

For this Special Issue, we welcome papers which address the functional interactions between the external parameters of plastic deformations (temperature, deformation, and deformation rates) and their internal structural characteristics (recrystallization, precipitation, and phase transformation). Submitted research should provide a description of the influence of the chosen approach on grain refinement and the final mechanical properties of the material in question. Other research addressing approaches for refining structures and for determining mechanical properties will also be considered for publication.

Finally, research on the structural and property refinement of all bulk and powder metal materials, their alloys, and their treatment methods (e.g., additive manufacturing and cryo deformation) will be considered for publication.

Prof. Dr. Tibor Kvačkaj
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • plastic deformation
  • severe plastic deformations
  • heat treatment
  • controlled cooling
  • microstructures
  • nanostructures
  • mechanical properties
  • metallic materials
  • metallic alloys
  • bulk metals
  • PM metals
  • additive manufacturing
  • cryo deformation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

10 pages, 3623 KiB  
Article
Interface Analysis between Inconel 625 and Cobalt-Chromium Alloy Fabricated by Powder Bed Fusion Using Pulsed Wave Laser
by Liming Yao, Aditya Ramesh, Zongheng Fan, Zhongmin Xiao, Guanhai Li, Quihui Zhuang and Jing Qiao
Materials 2023, 16(19), 6456; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16196456 - 28 Sep 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 856
Abstract
A few components used in the aerospace and petrochemical industries serve in corrosive environments at high temperatures. Corrosion-resistant metals or unique processes, such as coating and fusion welding, are required to improve the performance of the parts. We have used laser powder bed [...] Read more.
A few components used in the aerospace and petrochemical industries serve in corrosive environments at high temperatures. Corrosion-resistant metals or unique processes, such as coating and fusion welding, are required to improve the performance of the parts. We have used laser powder bed fusion (LPBF) technology to deposit a 5 mm thick corrosion-resistant CoCrMo layer on a high-strength IN625 substrate to improve the corrosion resistance of the core parts of a valve. This study found that when the laser volumetric energy density (EV) ≤ 20, the tensile strength increases linearly with the increase in EV, and the slope of the curve is approximately 85°. The larger the slope, the greater the impact of EV on the intensity. When EV > 20, the sample strength reaches the maximum tensile strength. When the EV increases from 0 to 20, the fracture position of the sample shifts from CoCrMo to IN625. When EV ≤ 38, the strain increases linearly with the increase in EV, and the slope of the curve is approximately 67.5°. The sample strain rate reaches the maximum when EV > 38. Therefore, for an optimal sample strength and strain, EV should be greater than 38. This study provides theoretical and technical support for the manufacturing of corrosion-resistant dissimilar metal parts using LPBF technology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Metals and Alloys)
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12 pages, 1780 KiB  
Article
Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of TA2/Q235 Laser Weld Joint with Copper Interlayer
by Liang Zhang, Qi Wang, Xiaolei Guo, Pan Chen, Yinling Wang, Chen Wang, Zhanxue Wang and Zongling Wang
Materials 2023, 16(10), 3838; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16103838 - 19 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1137
Abstract
For the dissimilar metal welding needs of TA2 titanium and Q235 steel, preliminary trials were conducted using laser welding methods, and the results showed that the addition of a copper interlayer and the bias of the laser beam toward the Q235 side allowed [...] Read more.
For the dissimilar metal welding needs of TA2 titanium and Q235 steel, preliminary trials were conducted using laser welding methods, and the results showed that the addition of a copper interlayer and the bias of the laser beam toward the Q235 side allowed for an effective connection. The welding temperature field was simulated using the finite element method, and the optimum offset distance of 0.3 mm was obtained. Under the optimized parameters, the joint had good metallurgical bonding. Further SEM analysis showed that the microstructure of the bonding area between the weld bead and Q235 was a typical fusion weld pattern, while that of the bonding area between the weld bead and TA2 was in brazing mode. The microhardness of the cross-section showed complex fluctuations; the microhardness of the weld bead center was higher than that of the base metal due to the formation of a mixture microstructure of copper and dendritic Fe phases. The copper layer not involved in the weld pool mixing had almost the lowest microhardness. The highest microhardness was found at the bonding site of TA2 and the weld bead, mainly due to the formation of an intermetallic layer with a thickness of about 100 μm. Further detailed analysis revealed that the compounds included Ti2Cu, TiCu and TiCu2, showing a typical peritectic morphology. The tensile strength of the joint was approximately 317.6 MPa, reaching 82.71% of that of the Q235 and 75.44% of the TA2 base metal, respectively. The fracture occurred in the unmixed copper layer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Metals and Alloys)
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9 pages, 6951 KiB  
Article
Optimizing a Solution Heat Treatment by Increasing the Cooling Rate of Directional Solidification for Ni-Based Superalloys
by Yanbin Zhang, Ling Qin, Bin Zhu, Haijun Jiang, Li Tan, Taiwen Huang, Bin Gan, Ziqi Jie and Lin Liu
Materials 2023, 16(9), 3433; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16093433 - 28 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1362
Abstract
The solution heat treatment (SHT) of the third generation of single crystal (SC) Ni-based superalloys required up to 45 h and was expensive. In this study, SHT based on liquid metal cooling (LMC) was optimized to greatly reduce processing time. The experimental and [...] Read more.
The solution heat treatment (SHT) of the third generation of single crystal (SC) Ni-based superalloys required up to 45 h and was expensive. In this study, SHT based on liquid metal cooling (LMC) was optimized to greatly reduce processing time. The experimental and simulation results showed that residual segregation was evidently reduced, e.g., from 2.12 to 1.22 for the most heavily segregated Re. This led to a 16.7% increase in creep life, more uniform microstructures, and a decrease in solidification and homogenization porosity by a factor of 3.4. Structural refinement, approximately 0.32 times, served as the underlying mechanism for this optimization, which reduced diffusion distance and increased homogenization efficiency during SHT. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Metals and Alloys)
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