Special Issue "Electro-Active Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Paulo J. Bártolo
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical, Aerospace & Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK
Interests: additive manufacturing; digital manufacturing; advanced materials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Guilherme Caetano

Co-Guest Editor
Postgraduate Program in Biomedical Sciences, Fundação Hermínio Ometto, São Paulo, Brazil
Interests: biomaterials; cell biology; regenerative medicine; stem cells; tissue engineering
Dr. Henrique Almeida

Co-Guest Editor
School of Technology and Management, Polytechnic Institute of Leiria, Portugal
Interests: additive manufacturing; biomanufacturing; computer modelling and simulation; tissue engineering; scaffold design

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Scaffolds are physical substrates for cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation, ultimately leading to the regeneration of tissues. They must be biocompatible and biodegradable, have adequate mechanical properties, which depend on the type of tissue, and surface characteristics. Its capacity to stimulate cells is also another important requirement.

Electrical signals are critical physiological stimuli that strongly affect cell behaviour controlling cell adhesion, migration, and differentiation, DNA synthesis and protein secretion Therefore, electro-active scaffolds consisting of conductive fillers (e.g., carbon nanomaterials and conductive polymeric materials) blended with nonconductive biocompatible and biodegradable materials, or polymer/ceramic materials play a key role in tissue engineering by modulating cell proliferation and differentiation.

It is our pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue focusing on materials, processing techniques, computer modelling and simulation and in vitro/in vivo applications of electro-active scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Full papers, communications and reviews are all welcome.

Prof. Paulo Bártolo
Dr. Guilherme Caetano
Dr. Henrique Almeida
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • 3D printing
  • Biomanufacturing
  • Biocompatible materials
  • Conductive polymers
  • Carbon nanotubes
  • Graphene
  • Organic-inorganic conductive composites
  • Regenerative medicine
  • Scaffolds
  • Tissue engineering

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
3D Printing of Polycaprolactone–Polyaniline Electroactive Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering
Materials 2020, 13(3), 512; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13030512 - 22 Jan 2020
Cited by 3
Abstract
Electrostimulation and electroactive scaffolds can positively influence and guide cellular behaviour and thus has been garnering interest as a key tissue engineering strategy. The development of conducting polymers such as polyaniline enables the fabrication of conductive polymeric composite scaffolds. In this study, we [...] Read more.
Electrostimulation and electroactive scaffolds can positively influence and guide cellular behaviour and thus has been garnering interest as a key tissue engineering strategy. The development of conducting polymers such as polyaniline enables the fabrication of conductive polymeric composite scaffolds. In this study, we report on the initial development of a polycaprolactone scaffold incorporating different weight loadings of a polyaniline microparticle filler. The scaffolds are fabricated using screw-assisted extrusion-based 3D printing and are characterised for their morphological, mechanical, conductivity, and preliminary biological properties. The conductivity of the polycaprolactone scaffolds increases with the inclusion of polyaniline. The in vitro cytocompatibility of the scaffolds was assessed using human adipose-derived stem cells to determine cell viability and proliferation up to 21 days. A cytotoxicity threshold was reached at 1% wt. polyaniline loading. Scaffolds with 0.1% wt. polyaniline showed suitable compressive strength (6.45 ± 0.16 MPa) and conductivity (2.46 ± 0.65 × 10−4 S/cm) for bone tissue engineering applications and demonstrated the highest cell viability at day 1 (88%) with cytocompatibility for up to 21 days in cell culture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electro-Active Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle
Numerical Simulation of Electroactive Hydrogels for Cartilage–Tissue Engineering
Materials 2019, 12(18), 2913; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12182913 - 09 Sep 2019
Abstract
The intrinsic regeneration potential of hyaline cartilage is highly limited due to the absence of blood vessels, lymphatics, and nerves, as well as a low cell turnover within the tissue. Despite various advancements in the field of regenerative medicine, it remains a challenge [...] Read more.
The intrinsic regeneration potential of hyaline cartilage is highly limited due to the absence of blood vessels, lymphatics, and nerves, as well as a low cell turnover within the tissue. Despite various advancements in the field of regenerative medicine, it remains a challenge to remedy articular cartilage defects resulting from trauma, aging, or osteoarthritis. Among various approaches, tissue engineering using tailored electroactive scaffolds has evolved as a promising strategy to repair damaged cartilage tissue. In this approach, hydrogel scaffolds are used as artificial extracellular matrices, and electric stimulation is applied to facilitate proliferation, differentiation, and cell growth at the defect site. In this regard, we present a simulation model of electroactive hydrogels to be used for cartilage–tissue engineering employing open-source finite-element software FEniCS together with a Python interface. The proposed mathematical formulation was first validated with an example from the literature. Then, we computed the effect of electric stimulation on a circular hydrogel sample that served as a model for a cartilage-repair implant. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electro-Active Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle
3D Printing of Conductive Tissue Engineering Scaffolds Containing Polypyrrole Nanoparticles with Different Morphologies and Concentrations
Materials 2019, 12(15), 2491; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12152491 - 06 Aug 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Inspired by electrically active tissues, conductive materials have been extensively developed for electrically active tissue engineering scaffolds. In addition to excellent conductivity, nanocomposite conductive materials can also provide nanoscale structure similar to the natural extracellular microenvironment. Recently, the combination of three-dimensional (3D) printing [...] Read more.
Inspired by electrically active tissues, conductive materials have been extensively developed for electrically active tissue engineering scaffolds. In addition to excellent conductivity, nanocomposite conductive materials can also provide nanoscale structure similar to the natural extracellular microenvironment. Recently, the combination of three-dimensional (3D) printing and nanotechnology has opened up a new era of conductive tissue engineering scaffolds exhibiting optimized properties and multifunctionality. Furthermore, in the case of two-dimensional (2D) conductive film scaffolds such as periosteum, nerve membrane, skin repair, etc., the traditional preparation process, such as solvent casting, produces 2D films with defects of unequal bubbles and thickness frequently. In this study, poly-l-lactide (PLLA) conductive scaffolds incorporated with polypyrrole (PPy) nanoparticles, which have multiscale structure similar to natural tissue, were prepared by combining extrusion-based low-temperature deposition 3D printing with freeze-drying. Furthermore, we creatively integrated the advantages of 3D printing and solvent casting and successfully developed a 2D conductive film scaffold with no bubbles, uniform thickness, and good structural stability. Subsequently, the effects of concentration and morphology of PPy nanoparticles on electrical properties and mechanical properties of 3D conductive scaffolds and 2D conductive films scaffolds have been studied, which provided a new idea for the design of both 2D and 3D electroactive tissue engineering scaffolds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electro-Active Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering)
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