Special Issue "Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery Application"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Leonid Gurevich
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Materials and Production, Aalborg University, DK-9220 Aalborg, Denmark
Interests: Nanotechnology; Self-Assembly; DNA; AFM; Drug delivery; Biosensors; Molecular Electronics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The concept of drug delivery is undoubtedly one of the most promising developments we have witnessed in medicine and pharmacology. Classical systemic administration of drugs largely limits their efficacy and leads to numerous side effects, which are particularly damaging in cancer therapies. Drug delivery systems, on the other hand, can bring drugs or nucleic acids specifically to the targeted organs, cells, and even cellular compartments with no or minimal damage to healthy tissues. Nowadays, an ever-increasing toolbox of drug delivery systems is available; however, only a handful of drug delivery systems have made it from the laboratory stage to the market, and our understanding of their uptake mechanisms is rather limited.

In this Special Issue, we aim to cover recent advances in this vast and rapidly growing field and invite manuscripts on various nanomaterials for drug delivery, including liposomes, polymeric micelles and gels, electrospun and electrosprayed materials, DNA origami, protein and peptide assemblies, as well as other organic and inorganic nanoparticle drug carrier systems. We further welcome studies on targeting mechanisms, recognition, uptake, and drug release.

Prof. Leonid Gurevich
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Drug delivery; Nanomedicine
  • Polymeric drug delivery systems
  • Polymer gels
  • Liposomes
  • DNA origami
  • Micelles
  • DNA and RNA delivery
  • Targeted delivery
  • Endocytosis
  • Blood-brain barrier.

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Modulation of Entrapment Efficiency and In Vitro Release Properties of BSA-Loaded Chitosan Microparticles Cross-Linked with Citric Acid as a Potential Protein–Drug Delivery System
Materials 2020, 13(8), 1989; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13081989 - 24 Apr 2020
Abstract
Microparticles, aimed for oral protein and peptide drug delivery, were prepared via emulsion cross-linking using citric acid as cross-linker and polyglycerol polyricinoleate as surfactant. A comparative study of the interaction between chitosan and citric acid and its effect on the resulting microparticle properties [...] Read more.
Microparticles, aimed for oral protein and peptide drug delivery, were prepared via emulsion cross-linking using citric acid as cross-linker and polyglycerol polyricinoleate as surfactant. A comparative study of the interaction between chitosan and citric acid and its effect on the resulting microparticle properties was performed using different chitosan-to-cross-linker mass ratios and pH-values during fabrication of the microparticles. Non-cross-linked and cross-linked microparticles were studied in terms of size (4–12 μm), zeta potential (−15.7 to 12.8 mV), erosion (39.7–75.6%), a model protein encapsulation efficiency (bovine serum albumin) (6.8–27.6%), and loading capacity (10.4–40%). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction confirmed the ionic interaction between the protonated amine groups of chitosan and the carboxylate ions of the cross-linking agent. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the non-cross-linked microparticles had an uneven shape with wrinkled surfaces, while the cross-linked formulations were spherical in shape with smooth surfaces. On the basis of these data, the role of the surfactant and microparticle structure on the release mechanism was proposed. Control of the microparticle shape and release mechanisms is expected to be crucial in developing carriers for the controlled delivery of proteins and peptides. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery Application)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Alginate-Based Aerogel Particles as Drug Delivery Systems: Investigation of the Supercritical Adsorption and In Vitro Evaluations
Materials 2020, 13(2), 329; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13020329 - 10 Jan 2020
Abstract
The present work focuses on the preparation of alginate-based aerogels in the form of particles for their further study as potential drug delivery systems (solid dosage forms). The dripping method was used to prepare certain gel particles, and supercritical drying was used to [...] Read more.
The present work focuses on the preparation of alginate-based aerogels in the form of particles for their further study as potential drug delivery systems (solid dosage forms). The dripping method was used to prepare certain gel particles, and supercritical drying was used to obtain final alginate-based aerogel particles. Three model active substances (ketoprofen, nimesulide, loratadine) were impregnated into the obtained aerogels using the supercritical adsorption process. Using the method of X-ray analysis, it was shown that the in the obtained drug-loaded aerogels the corresponding active substances are in an amorphous state, and the stability of this state after six months of storage is confirmed. In vitro dissolution tests for obtained drug-loaded aerogels was performed. For each sample, an appropriate dissolution medium (with certain pH) was determined. In vitro investigations showed the increasing of the release rate for all model active substances. Time was required to release and dissolve 50% of the active drug from drug-loaded aerogels (T1/2), reduced in comparison with pure active drugs in crystalline form. Obtained results provide insight into the application of alginate-based aerogel particles as a drug delivery system to improve pharmacokinetic properties of certain active drugs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery Application)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Evaluation of Targeted Delivery to the Brain Using Magnetic Immunoliposomes and Magnetic Force
Materials 2019, 12(21), 3576; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12213576 - 31 Oct 2019
Abstract
Magnetic nanoparticles have great prospects for drug delivery purposes, as they can be designed with various surface coatings and conjugated with drugs and targeting moieties. They also have a unique potential for precise delivery when guided by magnetic force. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) [...] Read more.
Magnetic nanoparticles have great prospects for drug delivery purposes, as they can be designed with various surface coatings and conjugated with drugs and targeting moieties. They also have a unique potential for precise delivery when guided by magnetic force. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) denotes the interface between the blood and brain parenchyma and hinders the majority of drugs from entering the brain. Red fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles were encapsulated in liposomes and conjugated to antibodies targeting the rat transferrin receptor (OX26) to form magnetic immunoliposomes. These magnetic immunoliposomes enhanced the uptake by rat brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) in vitro. In situ brain perfusion in young rats high in the endogenous expression of transferrin receptors by BCECs, revealed enhanced uptake of magnetic immunoliposomes when compared to naked magnetic nanoparticles or non-targeted magnetic liposomes. When applying the external magnetic force, the magnetic nanoparticles were detected in the brain parenchyma, suggesting transport across the BBB. Ultrastructural examination of the immunoliposomes, unfortunately, was unable to confirm a complete encapsulation of all naked nanoparticles within the liposomes, suggesting that the data on the brain could derive from particles being released from the liposomes under influence of external magnetic force; hence hypothesizes on external magnetic force as a qualifier for dragging targeted magnetic immunoliposomes through the BBB. In conclusion, our results suggest that transport of magnetic nanoparticles present in BCECs by targeted delivery to the transferrin receptor may undergo further transport into the brain when applying magnetic force. While magnetic immunoliposomes are targetable to BCECs, their design to enable further transport across the BBB when applying external magnetic force needs further improvement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery Application)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Drug Delivery with Polymeric Nanocarriers—Cellular Uptake Mechanisms
Materials 2020, 13(2), 366; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13020366 - 13 Jan 2020
Cited by 5
Abstract
Nanocarrier-based systems hold a promise to become “Dr. Ehrlich’s Magic Bullet” capable of delivering drugs, proteins and genetic materials intact to a specific location in an organism down to subcellular level. The key question, however, how a nanocarrier is internalized by cells and [...] Read more.
Nanocarrier-based systems hold a promise to become “Dr. Ehrlich’s Magic Bullet” capable of delivering drugs, proteins and genetic materials intact to a specific location in an organism down to subcellular level. The key question, however, how a nanocarrier is internalized by cells and how its intracellular trafficking and the fate in the cell can be controlled remains yet to be answered. In this review we survey drug delivery systems based on various polymeric nanocarriers, their uptake mechanisms, as well as the experimental techniques and common pathway inhibitors applied for internalization studies. While energy-dependent endocytosis is observed as the main uptake pathway, the integrity of a drug-loaded nanocarrier upon its internalization appears to be a seldomly addressed problem that can drastically affect the uptake kinetics and toxicity of the system in vitro and in vivo. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery Application)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop