Special Issue "Diamond, DLC and Ultra-Hard Coatings"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Thin Films".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Francisco J. G. Silva
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Guest Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ultra-hard coatings constitute a remarkable technical surplus in many areas, with tribology being one of the most important. Concerns about sustainability have grown remarkably, as extreme phenomena are happening around the world. Ultra-hard coatings make it possible to contribute effectively to increased sustainability by creating products with better properties and longer lifespan characteristics without the need to use toxic substances or produce difficult-to-treat effluents. This contribution to sustainability is still felt through the reduction of friction between surfaces, which allows for remarkable energy savings. Processes such as PVD and CVD have allowed a remarkable evolution in this area. The research around this type of coatings has been remarkable, allowing us to adapt coatings to the specific needs of each application. In the last decades, it has become extremely easy to find products with multilayer coatings, or with a differentiated composition throughout their cross-section. Through copious advances due to intense research activity in this area, the performance of numerous products has been significantly improved.

This Special Issue aims to promote the dissemination of the latest advances in this field, namely the development of new coatings and new structures, the characterization of these coatings, the design of coatings for tailored applications, and the tribological characterization of ultra-hard coatings, among others.

Thus, the topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Diamond coating synthesis;
  • DLC coating systhesis/deposition;
  • Ultra-hard coating synthesis/deposition;
  • Ultra-hard multilayered coatings;
  • Nanostructured ultra-hard coatings;
  • Coating synthesis and deposition optimization;
  • Simulation applied to coatings characterization;
  • CVD and PVD techniques for the synthesis and deposition of ultra-hard coatings;
  • Characterization of ultra-hard coatings;
  • Tribological characterization of ultra-hard coatings;
  • Study of coatings adhesion to substrates;
  • Residual stresses studies on ultra-hard coatings;
  • Novel coating characterization techniques;
  • Tailor-made ultra-hard coatings;
  • Coatings for cutting tools;
  • Study of friction in ultra-hard coatings;
  • Lifespan study of ultra-hard coatings;
  • Ultra-hard coating applications;
  • Sustainability of ultra-hard coatings.

Prof. Dr. Francisco J. G. Silva
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Diamond coatings
  • DLC coatings
  • Ultra-hard coatings
  • Multilayer coatings
  • Tribological coatings
  • Nanostructured coatings
  • Tribological characterization of coatings
  • Micro-hardness, Ultra-micro-hardness
  • Simulation in coatings science
  • Friction, Cutting tools, Ultra-hard coatings application
  • Sustainable materials

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Influence of Adhesive Strength, Fatigue Strength and Contact Mechanics on the Drilling Performance of Diamond Coating
Materials 2020, 13(6), 1402; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13061402 - 19 Mar 2020
Abstract
Adhesive strength of the coating significantly affects the lifetime of the coating. However, it is still inevitable for the coating, even with strong adhesive strength, to peel off from the substrate after working for a while. In this work, fatigue and wear behaviors [...] Read more.
Adhesive strength of the coating significantly affects the lifetime of the coating. However, it is still inevitable for the coating, even with strong adhesive strength, to peel off from the substrate after working for a while. In this work, fatigue and wear behaviors were employed to analyze the effect on the mechanics of coating and contribute to a fundamental understanding of peeling of the coating. A small-size Co-cemented tungsten carbide drill bit was selected as the examined substrate to fabricate the diamond coating. Roughening pretreatment with a diamond slurry combined with ultrasonic vibration was performed for the substrate surface to enhance adhesive strength. Meanwhile, a diamond coating without roughening pretreatment was also fabricated for comparison. The lifetime and quality of the coating were evaluated by the drilling test. Although the diamond coating could grow on the substrates with and without roughening pretreatment, the diamond coating with roughening pretreatment possessed a higher lifetime and stronger wear resistance than that without roughening pretreatment. We found that both substrates with and without roughening pretreatment exhibited a coarse surface, whereas the roughening pretreatment could remove the original machined surface of the substrate and thus make the near surface with numerous integrated crystalline grains become the new topmost surface. This increased the contact area and surface energy of the interface, leading to the improvement of adhesive strength. Finally, fatigue strength and contact mechanics were studied to trace the changes in the stress of the diamond coating in the whole process of drilling from a theoretical point of view. We suggest that fatigue strength and contact mechanics may play vital roles on the durability and peeling of the coating. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diamond, DLC and Ultra-Hard Coatings)
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Open AccessArticle
Microstructures Manufactured in Diamond by Use of Laser Micromachining
Materials 2020, 13(5), 1199; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13051199 - 06 Mar 2020
Abstract
Different microstructures were created on the surface of a polycrystalline diamond plate (obtained by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition—MW PECVD process) by use of a nanosecond pulsed DPSS (diode pumped solid state) laser with a 355 nm wavelength and a galvanometer scanning system. [...] Read more.
Different microstructures were created on the surface of a polycrystalline diamond plate (obtained by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition—MW PECVD process) by use of a nanosecond pulsed DPSS (diode pumped solid state) laser with a 355 nm wavelength and a galvanometer scanning system. Different average powers (5 to 11 W), scanning speeds (50 to 400 mm/s) and scan line spacings (“hatch spacing”) (5 to 20 µm) were applied. The microstructures were then examined using scanning electron microscopy, confocal microscopy and Raman spectroscopy techniques. Microstructures exhibiting excellent geometry were obtained. The precise geometries of the microstructures, exhibiting good perpendicularity, deep channels and smooth surfaces show that the laser microprocessing can be applied in manufacturing diamond microfluidic devices. Raman spectra show small differences depending on the process parameters used. In some cases, the diamond band (at 1332 cm−1) after laser modification of material is only slightly wider and shifted, but with no additional peaks, indicating that the diamond is almost not changed after laser interaction. Some parameters did show that the modification of material had occurred and additional peaks in Raman spectra (typical for low-quality chemical vapor deposition CVD diamond) appeared, indicating the growing disorder of material or manufacturing of the new carbon phase. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diamond, DLC and Ultra-Hard Coatings)
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