Special Issue "Design, Processing and Properties of Scaffolds for Tissue and Organ Engineering"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 April 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Edgar B. Montufar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Materials Characterization and Advanced Coatings, Central European Institute of Technology, Brno University of Technology, 612 00 Brno, Czech Republic
Interests: biomaterials and tissue engineering; biomaterial fabrication; additive manufacturing; calcium phosphates; composite materials; biodegradable materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In tissue engineering approaches, the scaffold is one of the three essential elements for the in vitro fabrication of biological constructs that restore the structure and function of damaged tissues and organs. A broad range of materials and processes have been developed and continue in development for the fabrication of scaffolds, resulting in specific properties suitable for the regeneration of particular organs and tissues. This Special issue will highlight recent advances in the design, processing and characterization of scaffolds, together with the efforts and barriers to their transfer into clinical practice. The original research findings and review articles in this Special Issue should provide a comprehensive view of the performance, success and current advances in scaffold science and engineering, as well as inspiration to overcome the challenges identified. You are very welcome to contribute with innovative articles to this Special Issue. Topics of particular interest include, but are not limited to, the keywords below.

Dr. Edgar B. Montufar
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Polymeric, ceramic, metallic and composite scaffolds
  • Top-down and bottom-up processing approaches
  • Scaffolds for soft and hard tissue regeneration
  • Bioactive and intelligent (stimulus-responsive) scaffolds
  • Control of porosity and degradation rate
  • Mechanical performance and mechanical biocompatibility
  • Three-dimensional cell culture and cell behavior
  • Surface modification and antimicrobial strategies
  • Non-conventional biomedical applications of scaffolds
  • Legislation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Perfusion Decellularization of Extrahepatic Bile Duct Allows Tissue-Engineered Scaffold Generation by Preserving Matrix Architecture and Cytocompatibility
Materials 2021, 14(11), 3099; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14113099 - 05 Jun 2021
Viewed by 1218
Abstract
Reconstruction of bile ducts damaged remains a vexing medical problem. Surgeons have few options when it comes to a long segment reconstruction of the bile duct. Biological scaffolds of decellularized biliary origin may offer an approach to support the replace of bile ducts. [...] Read more.
Reconstruction of bile ducts damaged remains a vexing medical problem. Surgeons have few options when it comes to a long segment reconstruction of the bile duct. Biological scaffolds of decellularized biliary origin may offer an approach to support the replace of bile ducts. Our objective was to obtain an extracellular matrix scaffold derived from porcine extrahepatic bile ducts (dECM-BD) and to analyze its biological and biochemical properties. The efficiency of the tailored perfusion decellularization process was assessed through histology stainings. Results from 4’-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stainings, and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) quantification showed proper extracellular matrix (ECM) decellularization with an effectiveness of 98%. Immunohistochemistry results indicate an effective decrease in immunogenic marker as human leukocyte antigens (HLA-A) and Cytokeratin 7 (CK7) proteins. The ECM of the bile duct was preserved according to Masson and Herovici stainings. Data derived from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed the preservation of the dECM-BD hierarchical structures. Cytotoxicity of dECM-BD was null, with cells able to infiltrate the scaffold. In this work, we standardized a decellularization method that allows one to obtain a natural bile duct scaffold with hierarchical ultrastructure preservation and adequate cytocompatibility. Full article
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Article
Lyophilized Polyvinylpyrrolidone Hydrogel for Culture of Human Oral Mucosa Stem Cells
Materials 2021, 14(1), 227; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14010227 - 05 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1331
Abstract
This work shows the synthesis of a polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) hydrogel by heat-activated polymerization and explores the production of hydrogels with an open porous network by lyophilisation to allow the three-dimensional culture of human oral mucosa stem cells (hOMSCs). The swollen hydrogel showed a [...] Read more.
This work shows the synthesis of a polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) hydrogel by heat-activated polymerization and explores the production of hydrogels with an open porous network by lyophilisation to allow the three-dimensional culture of human oral mucosa stem cells (hOMSCs). The swollen hydrogel showed a storage modulus similar to oral mucosa and elastic solid rheological behaviour without sol transition. A comprehensive characterization of porosity by scanning electron microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry and nano-computed tomography (with spatial resolution below 1 μm) showed that lyophilisation resulted in the heterogeneous incorporation of closed oval-like pores in the hydrogel with broad size distribution (5 to 180 μm, d50 = 65 μm). Human oral mucosa biopsies were used to isolate hOMSCs, expressing typical markers of mesenchymal stem cells in more than 95% of the cell population. Direct contact cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that PVP hydrogel have no negative effect on cell metabolic activity, allowing the culture of hOMSCs with normal fusiform morphology. Pore connectivity should be improved in future to allow cell growth in the bulk of the PVP hydrogel. Full article
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Review

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Review
Auxetic Structures for Tissue Engineering Scaffolds and Biomedical Devices
Materials 2021, 14(22), 6821; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14226821 - 12 Nov 2021
Viewed by 519
Abstract
An auxetic structure utilizing a negative Poisson’s ratio, which can expand transversally when axially expanded under tensional force, has not yet been studied in the tissue engineering and biomedical area. However, the recent advent of new technologies, such as additive manufacturing or 3D [...] Read more.
An auxetic structure utilizing a negative Poisson’s ratio, which can expand transversally when axially expanded under tensional force, has not yet been studied in the tissue engineering and biomedical area. However, the recent advent of new technologies, such as additive manufacturing or 3D printing, has showed prospective results aimed at producing three-dimensional structures. Auxetic structures are fabricated by additive manufacturing, soft lithography, machining technology, compressed foaming, and textile fabrication using various biomaterials, including poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate), polyurethane, poly(lactic-glycolic acid), chitosan, hydroxyapatite, and using a hard material such as a silicon wafer. After fabricating the scaffold with an auxetic effect, researchers have cultured fibroblasts, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, myoblasts, and various stem cells, including mesenchymal stem cells, bone marrow stem cells, and embryonic stem cells. Additionally, they have shown new possibilities as scaffolds through tissue engineering by cell proliferation, migration, alignment, differentiation, and target tissue regeneration. In addition, auxetic structures and their unique deformation characteristics have been explored in several biomedical devices, including implants, stents, and surgical screws. Although still in the early stages, the auxetic structure, which can create mechanical properties tailored to natural tissue by changing the internal architecture of the structure, is expected to show an improved tissue reconstruction ability. In addition, continuous research at the cellular level using the auxetic micro and nano-environment could provide a breakthrough for tissue reconstruction. Full article
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