Special Issue "Nutraceuticals and Pharmaceuticals from Marine Fish and Invertebrates"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Vida Šimat
Website
Guest Editor
University Department of Marine Studies, University of Split, Croatia
Interests: marine-originated bioactive components; food application; fatty acids; food safety and quality; in vitro antioxidants and antimicrobials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the continuous search for sustainable natural sources of bioactive compounds for the food and pharmaceutical industries, marine organisms, comprising approximately one-half of the global biodiversity, are one of the most important and recently investigated bio-resources. Bioactive compounds isolated from marine micro and macroalgae, animals, and microorganisms are considered a safe and environmentally friendly alternative to existing synthetic nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. In this Special Issue of Marine Drugs, you are invited to submit recent advances in research of the bioactive compounds from marine fish and Invertebrates (both wild-caught and cultured) and their by-products, including enzymes, pigments, peptides, proteins, essential fatty acids (particularly eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid), vitamins, and minerals, their chemistry and biological activity, as well as innovations in their production/extraction and application as nutraceuticals, therapeutic agents and pharmaceuticals. We also welcome research on the role of these components in protecting human health, standardization of these compounds through studies and trials, research on safety, purity, and dosage of the ingredients in commercial products and development of new nutraceuticals, therapeutic agents, and pharmaceuticals.

Prof. Dr. Vida Šimat
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Extraction method
  • Bioactive peptides
  • Biological activity
  • Food application
  • Therapeutic effect
  • Enzyme inhibitors

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Antioxidant Peptides from Collagen Hydrolysate of Redlip Croaker (Pseudosciaena polyactis) Scales: Preparation, Characterization, and Cytoprotective Effects on H2O2-Damaged HepG2 Cells
Mar. Drugs 2020, 18(3), 156; https://doi.org/10.3390/md18030156 - 11 Mar 2020
Abstract
Bioactive peptides from fish collagens with antioxidant properties have become a topic of great interest for health, food, and processing/preservation industries. To explore the high-value utilized way of scales produced during the fish processing, collagen hydrolysates of redlip croaker (Pseudosciaena polyactis) [...] Read more.
Bioactive peptides from fish collagens with antioxidant properties have become a topic of great interest for health, food, and processing/preservation industries. To explore the high-value utilized way of scales produced during the fish processing, collagen hydrolysates of redlip croaker (Pseudosciaena polyactis) scales were prepared using six different proteases, and the hydrolysate (RSCH) prepared using neutrase showed the highest degree of hydrolysis (21.36 ± 1.18%) and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH·) radical scavenging activity (30.97 ± 1.56%) among the six hydrolysates. Subsequently, six antioxidant peptides were purified from RSCH using membrane ultrafiltration and serial chromatography, and their amino acid sequences were identified as DGPEGR, GPEGPMGLE, EGPFGPEG, YGPDGPTG, GFIGPTE, and IGPLGA with molecular masses of 629.61, 885.95, 788.96, 762.75, 733.80, and 526.61 Da, respectively. Among six collagen peptides, GPEGPMGLE, EGPFGPEG, and GFIGPTE exhibited the strongest scavenging activities on DPPH· radical (EC50 0.59, 0.37, and 0.45 mg/mL), hydroxyl radical (EC50 0.45, 0.33, and 0.32 mg/mL), and superoxide anion radical (EC50 0.62, 0.47, and 0.74 mg/mL). GPEGPMGLE, EGPFGPEG, and GFIGPTE showed high inhibiting ability on lipid peroxidation in a linoleic acid model system and protective activities on oxidation-damaged DNA. More importantly, GPEGPMGLE, EGPFGPEG, and GFIGPTE could protect HepG2 cells from H2O2-induced oxidative damage through decreasing the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and MDA and activating intracellular antioxidant enzymes of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). These results suggested that six collagen peptides (RCP1–RCP6), especially GPEGPMGLE, EGPFGPEG, and GFIGPTE, might serve as potential antioxidants applied in nutraceutical and pharmaceutical products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutraceuticals and Pharmaceuticals from Marine Fish and Invertebrates)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Fish-Based Bioactives as Potent Nutraceuticals: Exploring the Therapeutic Perspective of Sustainable Food from the Sea
Mar. Drugs 2020, 18(5), 265; https://doi.org/10.3390/md18050265 - 18 May 2020
Abstract
Recent developments in nutraceuticals and functional foods have confirmed that bioactive components present in our diet play a major therapeutic role against human diseases. Moreover, there is a huge emphasis on food scientists for identifying and producing foods with better bioactive activity, which [...] Read more.
Recent developments in nutraceuticals and functional foods have confirmed that bioactive components present in our diet play a major therapeutic role against human diseases. Moreover, there is a huge emphasis on food scientists for identifying and producing foods with better bioactive activity, which can ultimately provide wellness and well-being to human health. Among the several well-known foods with bioactive constituents, fish has always been considered important, due to its rich nutritional values and by-product application in food industries. Nutritionists, food scientists, and other scientific communities have been working jointly to uncover new bioactive molecules that could increase the potential and therapeutic benefits of these bioactive components. Despite the innumerable benefits of fish and known fish bioactive molecules, its use by food or pharmaceutical industries is scarce, and even research on fish-based nutraceuticals is not promising. Therefore, this review focuses on the current information/data available regarding fish bioactive components, its application as nutraceuticals for therapeutic purposes in the treatment of chronic diseases, ethnic issues related to consumption of fish or its by-products. Especial emphasis is given on the utilization of fish wastes and its by-products to fulfill the world demand for cheap dietary supplements specifically for underdeveloped/least developed countries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutraceuticals and Pharmaceuticals from Marine Fish and Invertebrates)
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