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Special Issue "Marine Health Compounds: From Extraction to Food and Pharmaceutical Application"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Francisco J. Barba

Nutrition and Food Science Area, Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Food Sciences, Toxicology and Forensic Medicine Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universitat de València, Avda. Vicent Andrés Estellés, s/n, 46100 Burjassot, València, Spain
Website 1 | Website 2 | E-Mail
Interests: Supercritical Fluid Extraction; Phytochemical Purification; Phytochemical Analysis; Compound Isolation
Guest Editor
Prof. Jose Manuel Lorenzo

Centro Tecnologico de la Carne de Galicia, Ourense, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: bioactive compounds; nutritional value; new products; sensorial analysis; antioxidants

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Legislative issues and the growing awareness of consumers in preservatives of natural origin has increased food and pharmaceutical industry interest in marine high-added value compounds (e.g., macro and micronutrients, bioactive compounds, etc.). Conventional extraction techniques have been traditionally used to obtain oils and high-added value compounds from marine products. However, there are some inherent drawbacks, such as low extraction yields, use of toxic solvents, long extraction times, which should be avoided. Therefore, new innovative green extraction processes (ultrasound, microwaves, electrotechnologies, high pressure, SC-CO2, etc.) are required. Moreover, oil and extracts obtained from algae have an excellent nutritional and bioactive composition, thus being a useful strategy to be incorporated into different food matrices as they can have a favorable effect on both technological and functional properties of food products.

In this Special Issue, the Guest Editors would like to revisit the current researches done on bioactive compounds, fatty acids, vitamins, mineral, fiber, etc. obtained from marine natural products. We would also like to invite colleagues to submit articles on their current research on the incorporation of high-added value compounds obtained from marine natural products into food and pharmaceutical products.

Prof. Ay. Dr. Francisco J. Barba
Prof. Jose Manuel Lorenzo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Bioactive compounds
  • High-added value compounds
  • Antioxidant compounds
  • Fatty acids
  • New products
  • Green extraction

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Seasonal Variability of the Biochemical Composition and Antioxidant Properties of Fucus spiralis at Two Azorean Islands
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(8), 248; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16080248
Received: 15 June 2018 / Revised: 4 July 2018 / Accepted: 24 July 2018 / Published: 26 July 2018
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Abstract
This study evaluates, for the first time, the seasonal (winter and summer) and geographical (São Miguel–SMG and Santa Maria–SMA Islands) variability of Fucus spiralis (Fs) biochemical composition (dry weight basis) and antioxidant properties. Protein and carbohydrates presented higher values in Fs-SMGwinter,
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This study evaluates, for the first time, the seasonal (winter and summer) and geographical (São Miguel–SMG and Santa Maria–SMA Islands) variability of Fucus spiralis (Fs) biochemical composition (dry weight basis) and antioxidant properties. Protein and carbohydrates presented higher values in Fs-SMGwinter, lipids, total dietary fiber, and energy value in Fs-SMAsummer, and ash and soluble dietary fiber/insoluble dietary fiber ratio in Fs-SMAwinter. The fatty acid (FA) profiles showed a lower SFA in Fs-SMGsummer, whereas MUFA and PUFA presented higher values in Fs-SMGsummer and Fs-SMGwinter, respectively. Excellent dietary ratios of n6/n3 PUFA and hypocholesterolemic/hypercholesterolemic FA were found, with lower values in Fs-SMAwinter and higher in Fs-SMGsummer, respectively. The highest total phenolics was found in Fs-SMAsummer acetone:water extract and total flavonoids showed the higher value in Fs-SMGwinter methanol extract. The best free radical-scavenging activity was observed in the Fs-SMAwinter methanol (EC50 = 0.045 mg/mL) and acetone:water (EC50 = 0.059 mg/mL) extracts. The ferric-reducing antioxidant power showed the best results in Fs-SMAwinter methanol extract (EC50 = 0.016 mg/mL) and Fs-SMAsummer acetone:water extract (EC50 = 0.017 mg/mL). The best ferrous ion-chelating activity was found in Fs-SMGwinter acetone:water extract. Overall, results revealed that F. spiralis nutritional and functional bioactivity values have geographical and seasonal variations and that its regular consumption may add benefits to human health. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Dietary Supplementation with a Magnesium-Rich Marine Mineral Blend Enhances the Diversity of Gastrointestinal Microbiota
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(6), 216; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16060216
Received: 18 March 2018 / Revised: 25 April 2018 / Accepted: 9 June 2018 / Published: 20 June 2018
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Abstract
Accumulating evidence demonstrates that dietary supplementation with functional food ingredients play a role in systemic and brain health as well as in healthy ageing. Conversely, deficiencies in calcium and magnesium as a result of the increasing prevalence of a high fat/high sugar “Western
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Accumulating evidence demonstrates that dietary supplementation with functional food ingredients play a role in systemic and brain health as well as in healthy ageing. Conversely, deficiencies in calcium and magnesium as a result of the increasing prevalence of a high fat/high sugar “Western diet” have been associated with health problems such as obesity, inflammatory bowel diseases, and cardiovascular diseases, as well as metabolic, immune, and psychiatric disorders. It is now recognized that modulating the diversity of gut microbiota, the population of intestinal bacteria, through dietary intervention can significantly impact upon gut health as well as systemic and brain health. In the current study, we show that supplementation with a seaweed and seawater-derived functional food ingredient rich in bioactive calcium and magnesium (0.1% supplementation) as well as 70 other trace elements, significantly enhanced the gut microbial diversity in adult male rats. Given the significant impact of gut microbiota on health, these results position this marine multi-mineral blend (MMB) as a promising digestive-health promoting functional food ingredient. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Food Modulation Controls Astaxanthin Accumulation in Eggs of the Sea Urchin Arbacia lixula
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(6), 186; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16060186
Received: 17 April 2018 / Revised: 23 May 2018 / Accepted: 26 May 2018 / Published: 28 May 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (413 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The carotenoid astaxanthin has strong antioxidant properties with beneficial effects for various degenerative diseases. This carotenoid is produced by some microalgae species when cultivated in particular conditions, and, interestingly, it is a predominant carotenoid in aquatic animals throughout a broad range of taxa.
[...] Read more.
The carotenoid astaxanthin has strong antioxidant properties with beneficial effects for various degenerative diseases. This carotenoid is produced by some microalgae species when cultivated in particular conditions, and, interestingly, it is a predominant carotenoid in aquatic animals throughout a broad range of taxa. Recently, astaxanthin was detected in the eggs of the sea urchin Arbacia lixula in relevant concentrations when this organism was maintained in culture. These results have paved the way for deeper research into astaxanthin production by this species, particularly in regards to how astaxanthin production can be modulated by diet. Results showed that the highest content of astaxanthin in eggs was observed in sea urchins fed on a diet enriched with Spirulina platensis. This result was confirmed by the high antioxidant activity recorded in the egg extracts of these animals. Our results suggest that (i) the sea urchin A. lixula is able to synthesize astaxanthin from precursors obtained from food, and (ii) it is possible to modulate the astaxanthin accumulation in sea urchin eggs by modifying the proportions of different food ingredients provided in their diet. This study demonstrates the large potential of sea urchin cultivation for the eco-sustainable production of healthy supplements for nutraceutical applications. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Preparation, Physicochemical and Antioxidant Properties of Acid- and Pepsin-Soluble Collagens from the Swim Bladders of Miiuy Croaker (Miichthys miiuy)
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(5), 161; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16050161
Received: 1 April 2018 / Revised: 2 May 2018 / Accepted: 9 May 2018 / Published: 12 May 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (3338 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Collagen is one of the most useful biomaterials and widely applied in functional food and cosmetics. However, some consumers have paid close attention to the safety of mammalian collagens because of the outbreaks of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), and other
[...] Read more.
Collagen is one of the most useful biomaterials and widely applied in functional food and cosmetics. However, some consumers have paid close attention to the safety of mammalian collagens because of the outbreaks of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), and other prion diseases. Therefore, there is a strong demand for developing alternative sources of collagen, with one promising source being from the process by-products of commercial fisheries. In this report, acid-soluble collagen (ASC-SB) and pepsin-soluble collagen (PSC-SB) from swim bladders of miiuy croaker (Miichthys miiuy) were isolated with yields of 1.33 ± 0.11% and 8.37 ± 0.24% of dry swim bladder weight. Glycine was the major amino acid present, with a content of 320.5 (ASC-SB) and 333.6 residues/1000 residues (PSC-SB). ASC-SB and PSC-SB had much lower denaturation temperatures compared to mammalian collagen, a consequence of low imino acid contents (196.7 and 199.5 residues/1000 residues for ASC-SB and PSC-SB, respectively). The data of amino acid composition, SDS-PAGE pattern, UV and FTIR spectra confirmed that ASC-SB and PSC-SB were mainly composed of type I collagen. FTIR spectra data indicated there were more hydrogen bonding and intermolecular crosslinks in ASC-SB. These collagens showed high solubility in the acidic pH ranges and low NaCl concentrations (less than 2%). The Zeta potential values of ASC-SB and PSC-SB were 6.74 and 6.85, respectively. ASC-SB and PSC-SB presented irregular, dense, sheet-like films linked by random-coiled filaments under scanning electron microscopy. In addition, ASC-SB and PSC-SB could scavenge DPPH radical, hydroxyl radical, superoxide anion radical, and ABTS radical in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, the results indicate that collagens from the swim bladders of miiuy croaker are a viable substitute for mammalian collagen, with potential functional food and cosmeceutical applications. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Posidonia oceanica (L.) Delile Ethanolic Extract Modulates Cell Activities with Skin Health Applications
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16010021
Received: 6 November 2017 / Revised: 14 December 2017 / Accepted: 8 January 2018 / Published: 10 January 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1930 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Seagrasses are high plants sharing adaptive metabolic features with both terrestrial plants and marine algae, resulting in a phytocomplex possibly endowed with interesting biological properties. The aim of this study is to evaluate the in vitro activities on skin cells of an ethanolic
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Seagrasses are high plants sharing adaptive metabolic features with both terrestrial plants and marine algae, resulting in a phytocomplex possibly endowed with interesting biological properties. The aim of this study is to evaluate the in vitro activities on skin cells of an ethanolic extract obtained from the leaves of Posidonia oceanica (L.) Delile, family Potamogetonaceae, herein named Posidonia ethanolic extract (PEE). PEE showed high radical scavenging activity, high phenolic content, and resulted rich in chicoric acid, as determined through HPLC-MS analysis. The use of MTT assay on fibroblasts showed a PEE cytotoxicity threshold (IC05) of 50 µg/mL at 48 h, while a sub-toxic dose of 20 µg/mL induced a significant increase of fibroblast growth rate after 10 days. In addition, an ELISA assay revealed that PEE doses of 5 and 10 µg/mL induced collagen production in fibroblasts. PEE induced dose-dependent mushroom tyrosinase inhibition, up to about 45% inhibition at 1000 µg/mL, while 50% reduction of melanin was observed in melanoma cells exposed to 50 µg/mL PEE. Finally, PEE lipolytic activity was assessed by measuring glycerol release from adipocytes following triglyceride degradation. In conclusion, we have collected new data about the biological activities of the phytocomplex of P. oceanica seagrass on skin cells. Our findings indicate that PEE could be profitably used in the development of products for skin aging, undesired hyperpigmentation, and cellulite. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Proximate Composition and Nutritional Value of Three Macroalgae: Ascophyllum nodosum, Fucus vesiculosus and Bifurcaria bifurcata
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(11), 360; https://doi.org/10.3390/md15110360
Received: 8 August 2017 / Revised: 7 November 2017 / Accepted: 8 November 2017 / Published: 15 November 2017
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (299 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Proximate composition (moisture, protein, lipid and ash content) and nutritional value (fatty acid, amino acid and mineral profile) of three macroalgae (Ascophyllum nodosum, Fucus vesiculosus and Bifurcaria bifurcate) were studied. Chemical composition was significantly (p < 0.001) different among
[...] Read more.
Proximate composition (moisture, protein, lipid and ash content) and nutritional value (fatty acid, amino acid and mineral profile) of three macroalgae (Ascophyllum nodosum, Fucus vesiculosus and Bifurcaria bifurcate) were studied. Chemical composition was significantly (p < 0.001) different among the three seaweeds. In this regard, the B. bifurcata presented the highest fat content (6.54% of dry matter); whereas, F. vesiculosus showed the highest protein level (12.99% dry matter). Regarding fatty acid content, the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) were the most abundant followed by saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs). On the other hand, the three seaweeds are a rich source of K (from 3781.35 to 9316.28 mg/100 g), Mn (from 8.28 to 1.96 mg/100 g), Na (from 1836.82 to 4575.71 mg/100 g) and Ca (from 984.73 to 1160.27 mg/100 g). Finally, the most abundant amino acid was glutamic acid (1874.47–1504.53 mg/100 dry matter), followed by aspartic acid (1677.01–800.84 mg/100 g dry matter) and alanine (985.40–655.73 mg/100 g dry matter). Full article
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