Special Issue "Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Biomedical Application"

A special issue of Magnetochemistry (ISSN 2312-7481).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Teresa Lehmann

Department of Chemistry, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: NMR; cancer drugs; malaria; solution structure determination; interfacial phenomena; colloidal dispersion gels

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful technique that can be used to investigate the structure, dynamics, and chemical kinetics of a wide range of biomolecular systems. The development of cutting edge NMR methods in the last 30 years has revolutionized our ability to characterize biological macromolecules. The accelerated progress of NMR applied to biomolecules has lifted some previous limitations regarding molecular size, solubility and abundance, which used to hinder biopolymer-structure determination. NMR has emerged from being a measuring tool used only in chemistry and physics to become a widely used techniques in all areas of biological science, medical diagnosis, and clinical investigation. This Special Issue of the open access journal, Magnetochemistry, devoted to “Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Biomedical Applications”, will provide researches in the field with the opportunity to publish their most recent discoveries using this exciting technique.

Dr. Teresa Lehmann
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Magnetochemistry is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessCommunication
Sensitive Water Ligand Observed via Gradient Spectroscopy with 19F Detection for Analysis of Fluorinated Compounds Bound to Proteins
Magnetochemistry 2019, 5(2), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/magnetochemistry5020029
Received: 22 March 2019 / Revised: 9 April 2019 / Accepted: 24 April 2019 / Published: 1 May 2019
PDF Full-text (411 KB)
Abstract
The water ligand observed via a gradient spectroscopy type experiment with 19F detection was applied to selectively detect fluorinated compounds with affinity to the target proteins. The 19F signals of bound and unbound compounds were observed as opposite phases, which was [...] Read more.
The water ligand observed via a gradient spectroscopy type experiment with 19F detection was applied to selectively detect fluorinated compounds with affinity to the target proteins. The 19F signals of bound and unbound compounds were observed as opposite phases, which was advantageous to distinguish the binding state. The proposed NMR method was optimized based on the 19F{1H} saturation transfer difference pulse sequence, and various inversion pulses for the water resonance were evaluated with the aim of high sensitivity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Biomedical Application)
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