Special Issue "Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Code-Switching"

A special issue of Languages (ISSN 2226-471X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Mr. Draško Kašćelan

Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics, University of Cambridge; UK
E-Mail
Interests: bilingualism; code-switching; autism spectrum disorders; figurative language processing/comprehension; pragmatics; language acquisition and development
Guest Editor
Prof. Margaret Deuchar

Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics, University of Cambridge; UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: code-switching; bilingualism; language contact; language variation; language acquisition

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues

The impetus for this Special Issue arises from a recent workshop held at Cambridge entitled 'Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Code-Switching' (see http://www.languagesciences.cam.ac.uk/code-switching-1). Research on code-switching was the province of specialists in linguistics alone in the latter part of the twentieth century, and is still a valuable source of insights into the human language faculty. However, it has relatively recently attracted the attention of researchers in psycholinguistics and neuroscience because of its promise to throw light not only on how the brain manages two or more potentially competing languages, but also on how the brain itself may adapt to the demands of this process.

The goal of this Special Issue will be to introduce researchers to this rapidly developing field and to showcase work by those at the cutting edge of interdisciplinary research. An overview of code-switching research in linguistics will be followed by a psychological perspective on language control relating to different types of code-switching. Other papers will focus on the effects of code-switching at specific language levels, such as phonetics and morphology, and in both adults and children. A range of methods will be represented, including the use of naturalistic, experimental and neuroscientific data, and will be both qualitative and quantitative. A wide range of language combinations and type of speaker is envisaged.

We invite the submission of papers both from participants who attended the Cambridge workshop and those who did not. We would particularly welcome papers which use neuroscientific data to investigate code-switching and/or make use of the interdisciplinary perspectives outlined above. Manuscripts should be around 8000 words in length (the word limit does not include the abstract, tables and figures, footnotes or references).

Mr. Draško Kašćelan
Prof. Margaret Deuchar     
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Languages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • Code-switching

  • Psycholinguistics

  • Neurolinguistics

  • Cognition

  • Phonetics

  • Phonology

  • Morphology

  • Syntax

  • Simultaneous bilinguals

  • Successive bilinguals

  • Foreign language learners

  • Heritage language speakers

  • Typical and atypical language development

Published Papers (5 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Language Interaction in Emergent Grammars: Morphology and Word Order in Bilingual Children’s Code-Switching
Received: 13 February 2018 / Revised: 17 October 2018 / Accepted: 19 October 2018 / Published: 31 October 2018
PDF Full-text (4374 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper examines the morphological integration of nouns in bilingual children’s code-switching to investigate whether children adhere to constraints posited for adult code-switching. The changing nature of grammars in development makes the Matrix Language Frame a moving target; permeability between languages in bilinguals [...] Read more.
This paper examines the morphological integration of nouns in bilingual children’s code-switching to investigate whether children adhere to constraints posited for adult code-switching. The changing nature of grammars in development makes the Matrix Language Frame a moving target; permeability between languages in bilinguals undermines the concept of a monolingual grammatical frame. The data analysed consist of 630 diary entries with code-switching and structural transfer from two children (aged 2;10–7;2 and 6;6–11;0) bilingual in Estonian and English, languages which differ in morphological richness and the inflectional role of stem changes. The data reveal code-switching with late system morphemes, variability in stem selection and word order incongruence. Constituent order is analysed in utterances with and without code-switching, and the frame is shown to draw sometimes on both languages, raising questions about the MLF, which is meant to derive from the grammar of one language. If clauses without code-switched elements display non-standard morpheme order, then there is no reason to expect code-switching to follow a standard order, nor is it reasonable to assume a monolingual target grammar. Complex morphological integration of code-switches and interaction between the two languages are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Code-Switching)
Open AccessArticle Patterns of Short-Term Phonetic Interference in Bilingual Speech
Received: 28 January 2018 / Revised: 15 August 2018 / Accepted: 16 August 2018 / Published: 24 August 2018
PDF Full-text (597 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Previous research indicates that alternating between a bilingual’s languages during speech production can lead to short-term increases in cross-language phonetic interaction. However, discrepancies exist between the reported L1–L2 effects in terms of direction and magnitude, and sometimes the effects are not found at [...] Read more.
Previous research indicates that alternating between a bilingual’s languages during speech production can lead to short-term increases in cross-language phonetic interaction. However, discrepancies exist between the reported L1–L2 effects in terms of direction and magnitude, and sometimes the effects are not found at all. The present study focused on L1 interference in L2, examining Voice Onset Time (VOT) of English voiceless stops produced by L1-dominant Czech-English bilinguals—interpreter trainees highly proficient in L2-English. We tested two hypotheses: (1) switching between languages induces an immediate increase in L1 interference during code-switching; and (2) due to global language co-activation, an increase in L1-to-L2 interference occurs when bilinguals interpret (translate) a message from L1 into L2 even if they do not produce L1 speech. Fourteen bilinguals uttered L2-English sentences under three conditions: L2-only, code-switching into L2, and interpreting into L2. Against expectation, the results showed that English VOT in the bilingual tasks tended to be longer and less Czech-like compared to the English-only task. This contradicts an earlier finding of L2 VOT converging temporarily towards L1 VOT values for comparable bilingual tasks performed by speakers from the same bilingual population. Participant-level inspection of our data suggests that besides language-background differences, individual language-switching strategies contribute to discrepancies between studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Code-Switching)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Investigating Gender Assignment Strategies in Mixed Purepecha–Spanish Nominal Constructions
Received: 12 January 2018 / Revised: 31 May 2018 / Accepted: 4 July 2018 / Published: 16 July 2018
PDF Full-text (402 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Purepecha has no grammatical gender, whereas Spanish has a binary masculine–feminine system. In this paper we investigate how early sequential Purepecha–Spanish bilinguals assign gender to Purepecha nouns inserted into an otherwise Spanish utterance, using a director-matcher production task and an online forced-choice acceptability [...] Read more.
Purepecha has no grammatical gender, whereas Spanish has a binary masculine–feminine system. In this paper we investigate how early sequential Purepecha–Spanish bilinguals assign gender to Purepecha nouns inserted into an otherwise Spanish utterance, using a director-matcher production task and an online forced-choice acceptability judgement task. The results of the production task indicate a strong preference for masculine gender, irrespective of the gender of the noun’s translation equivalent, the so-called “masculine default” option. Participants in the comprehension task were influenced by the orthography of the Purepecha noun in the -a ending condition, leading them to assign feminine gender agreement to nouns that are masculine in Spanish, but preferred the masculine default strategy again in the -i/-u ending condition. The absence of the “analogical criterion” in both tasks contrasts with the results of some previous studies, underlining the need for more comparable data in terms of task type. Our results also highlight how task type can influence the choices speakers make, in this context, in terms of the choice of grammatical gender agreement strategy. Task type should therefore be carefully controlled in future studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Code-Switching)
Open AccessArticle Language Control and Code-switching
Received: 22 November 2017 / Revised: 7 March 2018 / Accepted: 22 March 2018 / Published: 28 March 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2652 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Analyses of corpus-based indices of conversational code-switching in bilingual speakers predict the occurrence of intra-sentential code-switches consistent with the joint activation of both languages. Yet most utterances contain no code-switches despite good evidence for the joint activation of both languages even in single [...] Read more.
Analyses of corpus-based indices of conversational code-switching in bilingual speakers predict the occurrence of intra-sentential code-switches consistent with the joint activation of both languages. Yet most utterances contain no code-switches despite good evidence for the joint activation of both languages even in single language utterances. Varying language activation levels is an insufficient mechanism to explain the variety of language use. We need a model of code-switching, consistent with the joint activation of both languages, which permits the range of language use in bilingual speakers. I treat overt speech as the outcome of a number of competitive processes governed by a set of control processes external to the language networks. In a conversation, the speech of the other person may “trigger” code-switches consistent with bottom-up control. By contrast, the intentions of the speaker may act top-down to set the constraints on language use. Given this dual control perspective, the paper extends the control process model (Green and Wei 2014) to cover a plausible neurocomputational basis for the construction and execution of utterance plans in code-switching. Distinct control states mediate different types of language use with switching frequency as a key parameter in determining the control state for code-switches. The paper considers the nature of these states and their transitions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Code-Switching)
Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview From the Field to the Lab: A Converging Methods Approach to the Study of Codeswitching
Received: 24 January 2018 / Revised: 29 May 2018 / Accepted: 30 May 2018 / Published: 6 June 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2429 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Variation in the ways by which an individual processes codeswitched language may reveal fundamental dynamics of the language system that are otherwise obscured under unilingual conditions. Despite this, an important aspect that has been largely neglected in the field is the role of [...] Read more.
Variation in the ways by which an individual processes codeswitched language may reveal fundamental dynamics of the language system that are otherwise obscured under unilingual conditions. Despite this, an important aspect that has been largely neglected in the field is the role of the bilingual experience in language processing. Drawing on corpus-driven and experimental research, the corpus-to-cognition approach to codeswitching integrates field- and laboratory-based work to examine how the bilingual experience may influence language processing. In this review, we elaborate on the best practices for investigating codeswitching, with converging evidence from different methodologies across different bilingual populations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Code-Switching)
Figures

Figure 1

Languages EISSN 2226-471X Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top