Special Issue "Emerging Technologies for the Next Generation Personalized and Precision Medicine"

A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Weng Kung Peng
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Spin Dynamics in Health Engineering, Songshan Lake Materials Laboratoy, Building A1, University Innovation Park, Songshan Lake, Dongguan 523808, China
Interests: precision medicine; NMR-based PoCT; machine learning
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

On behalf of the Journal of Personalized Medicine,  we cordially invite you to submit a manuscript to our Special Issue entitled “Emerging Technologies for the Next Generation Personalized and Precision Medicine”.

Since the early 1990s, when the first human genome project was initiated, an extensive effort has been placed on mapping the role of genes in the onset of diseases. Genetic contributions to different diseases however, were found to be varied and to often be very little, with non-genetic factors (e.g., microbiome, environmental hazards,) having much greater attributable risks.

In recent years, significant advances in technologies (e.g., micro NMR, micro raman, microfluidcs–photonics, various omics platforms) and novel methodologies (e.g., 3D gene sequencing) have enbabled a new-wave of personalized medicine. This Special Issue will discuss the recent advances of emerging technologies/methodologies that have or will transform the landscape of precision medicine. Submissions can be original research articles, reviews, or commentaries/perspectives.

Sincerely,

Dr. Peng Weng Kung
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Personalized Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Precision and personalized medicine
  • Methodologies/technologies translation
  • Omics platforms

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Omics Meeting Onics: Towards the Next Generation of Spectroscopic-Based Technologies in Personalized Medicine
J. Pers. Med. 2019, 9(3), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm9030039 - 01 Aug 2019
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3946
Abstract
This article aims to discuss the recent development of integrated point-of-care spectroscopic-based technologies that are paving the way for the next generation of diagnostic monitoring technologies in personalized medicine. Focusing on the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technologies as the leading example, we discuss [...] Read more.
This article aims to discuss the recent development of integrated point-of-care spectroscopic-based technologies that are paving the way for the next generation of diagnostic monitoring technologies in personalized medicine. Focusing on the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technologies as the leading example, we discuss the emergence of -onics technologies (e.g., photonics and electronics) and how their coexistence with -omics technologies (e.g., genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics) can potentially change the future technological landscape of personalized medicine. The idea of an open-source (e.g., hardware and software) movement is discussed, and we argue that technology democratization will not only promote the dissemination of knowledge and inspire new applications, but it will also increase the speed of field implementation. Full article
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Research

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Article
A Feasibility Study of an Extrusion-Based Fabrication Process for Personalized Drugs
J. Pers. Med. 2020, 10(1), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm10010016 - 04 Mar 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2604
Abstract
Developing a high-efficiency manufacturing system for personalized medicine plays an important role in increasing the feasibility of personalized medication. The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of a new extrusion-based fabrication process for personalized drugs with a faster production rate. [...] Read more.
Developing a high-efficiency manufacturing system for personalized medicine plays an important role in increasing the feasibility of personalized medication. The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of a new extrusion-based fabrication process for personalized drugs with a faster production rate. This process uses two syringe pumps with a coaxial needle as an extruder, which extrudes two materials with varying ratios into a capsule. The mixture of hydrogel, polyethylene glycol (PEG), hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, poly acrylic acid and the simulated active pharmaceutical ingredient, Aspirin, was used. To validate the method, samples with different ratios of immediate release (IR) and sustained release (SR) mixtures were fabricated. The results of a dissolution test show that it is feasible to control the release profile by changing the IR and SR ratio using this fabrication setup. The fabrication time for each capsule is about 20 seconds, which is significantly faster than the current 3D printing methods. In conclusion, the proposed fabrication method shows a clear potential to step toward the feasibility of personalized medication. Full article
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Review

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Review
Visualization and Measurements of Blood Cells Flowing in Microfluidic Systems and Blood Rheology: A Personalized Medicine Perspective
J. Pers. Med. 2020, 10(4), 249; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm10040249 - 26 Nov 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1058
Abstract
Hemorheological alterations in the majority of metabolic diseases are always connected with blood rheology disturbances, such as the increase of blood and plasma viscosity, cell aggregation enhancement, and reduction of the red blood cells (RBCs) deformability. Thus, the visualizations and measurements of blood [...] Read more.
Hemorheological alterations in the majority of metabolic diseases are always connected with blood rheology disturbances, such as the increase of blood and plasma viscosity, cell aggregation enhancement, and reduction of the red blood cells (RBCs) deformability. Thus, the visualizations and measurements of blood cells deformability flowing in microfluidic devices (point-of-care devices) can provide vital information to diagnose early symptoms of blood diseases and consequently to be used as a fast clinical tool for early detection of biomarkers. For instance, RBCs rigidity has been correlated with myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, among other blood diseases. In order to better understand the blood cells behavior in microfluidic devices, rheological properties analysis is gaining interest by the biomedical committee, since it is strongly dependent on the interactions and mechanical cells proprieties. In addition, the development of blood analogue fluids capable of reproducing the rheological properties of blood and mimic the RBCs behavior at in vitro conditions is crucial for the design, performance and optimization of the microfluidic devices frequently used for personalized medicine. By combining the unique features of the hemorheology and microfluidic technology for single-cell analysis, valuable advances in personalized medicine for new treatments and diagnosis approach can be achieved. Full article
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Perspective
A Perspective on Microneedle-Based Drug Delivery and Diagnostics in Paediatrics
J. Pers. Med. 2019, 9(4), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm9040049 - 15 Nov 2019
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3798
Abstract
Microneedles (MNs) have been extensively explored in the literature as a means to deliver drugs in the skin, surpassing the stratum corneum permeability barrier. MNs are potentially easy to produce and may allow the self-administration of drugs without causing pain or bleeding. More [...] Read more.
Microneedles (MNs) have been extensively explored in the literature as a means to deliver drugs in the skin, surpassing the stratum corneum permeability barrier. MNs are potentially easy to produce and may allow the self-administration of drugs without causing pain or bleeding. More recently, MNs have been investigated to collect/assess the interstitial fluid in order to monitor or detect specific biomarkers. The integration of these two concepts in closed-loop devices holds the promise of automated and minimally invasive disease detection/monitoring and therapy. These assure low invasiveness and, importantly, open a window of opportunity for the application of population-specific and personalised therapies. Full article
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Perspective
Perspective: Cellular and Molecular Profiling Technologies in Personalized Oncology
J. Pers. Med. 2019, 9(3), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm9030044 - 12 Sep 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3560
Abstract
Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and therefore one of the most important public health concerns. In this contribution, we discuss recent key enabling technological innovations (and their challenges), including biomarker-based technologies, that potentially allow for decentralization (e.g., self-monitoring) with the [...] Read more.
Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and therefore one of the most important public health concerns. In this contribution, we discuss recent key enabling technological innovations (and their challenges), including biomarker-based technologies, that potentially allow for decentralization (e.g., self-monitoring) with the increasing availability of point-of-care technologies in the near future. These technological innovations are moving the field one step closer toward personalized oncology. Full article
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