Special Issue "Advanced Functional Nanobiomaterials"

A special issue of Journal of Functional Biomaterials (ISSN 2079-4983).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Anderson Lobo

Laboratório Interdisciplinar de Materiais Avançados, Pós Graduação em Ciências e Engenharia dos Materiais, Universidade Federal do Piaui, 64049-550 Teresina, Piaui, Brazil
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nanofibrous scaffolds; nanogels; bioprinting; spinning techniques; smart material; multi-responsive materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Advanced functional nanobiomaterials for tissue engineering place high demands on materials and exceed the passive biocompatibility requirements previously considered acceptable for biomedical implants. Biomimetic materials can mimic the role of extracellular matrix (ECM) in tissues area that provides comprehensive uniqueness to the current medical world. Advanced functional nanobiomaterials cover breakthrough research in all aspects of materials science, including nanotechnology, chemistry, physics, and biology. Herein, the focus will be to receive papers about novel materials-based cues/architectures, including hydrogels and stimuli-responsive materials for in vivo drug/gene delivery application and to promote specific response from the cells in vitro and in vivo models. Along with (bio)-degradability, the activation of specific cell–material interactions and three-dimensional environments that mimics the extracellular matrix (ECM) are challenges and pre-requisites for the organization of living cells for functional tissues. Several micro/nanofabrication methods have been developed to produce functional biomaterials, such as electrospinning, rotary-jet spinning, 3-D bio-printing and others. This topic also covers the biomedical engineering science, a discipline that advances state-of-the-art knowledge in engineering, biology, and medicine. In addition, it improves human health through cross-disciplinary integration of engineering sciences, biomedical sciences and clinical practice. This Special Issue is open to receiving interdisciplinary papers from the frontiers of knowledge able to cover a broader range of materials with novel characteristics for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications.

Prof. Dr. Anderson Lobo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Functional Biomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 850 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Tissue engineering
  • Smart materials
  • Drug/gene delivery
  • Hybrid synthetic-natural hydrogels
  • Multi-responsive materials
  • Regenerative Medicine
  • Stem Cell Biology
  • Molecular dynamics simulations
  • Semi-empirical modeling libraries polymers

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Fabrication and Multiscale Structural Properties of Interconnected Porous Biomaterial for Tissue Engineering by Freeze Isostatic Pressure (FIP)
J. Funct. Biomater. 2018, 9(3), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb9030051
Received: 27 June 2018 / Revised: 11 August 2018 / Accepted: 20 August 2018 / Published: 24 August 2018
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Abstract
Biomaterial for tissue engineering is a topic of huge progress with a recent surge in fabrication and characterization advances. Biomaterials for tissue engineering applications or as scaffolds depend on various parameters such as fabrication technology, porosity, pore size, mechanical strength, and surface available [...] Read more.
Biomaterial for tissue engineering is a topic of huge progress with a recent surge in fabrication and characterization advances. Biomaterials for tissue engineering applications or as scaffolds depend on various parameters such as fabrication technology, porosity, pore size, mechanical strength, and surface available for cell attachment. To serve the function of the scaffold, the porous biomaterial should have enough mechanical strength to aid in tissue engineering. With a new manufacturing technology, we have obtained high strength materials by optimizing a few processing parameters such as pressure, temperature, and dwell time, yielding the monolith with porosity in the range of 80%–93%. The three-dimensional interconnectivity of the porous media through scales for the newly manufactured biomaterial has been investigated using newly developed 3D correlative and multi-modal imaging techniques. Multiscale X-ray tomography, FIB-SEM Slice & View stacking, and high-resolution STEM-EDS electronic tomography observations have been combined allowing quantification of morphological and geometrical spatial distributions of the multiscale porous network through length scales spanning from tens of microns to less than a nanometer. The spatial distribution of the wall thickness has also been investigated and its possible relationship with pore connectivity and size distribution has been studied. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Functional Nanobiomaterials)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Biocompatible Polymer Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery Applications in Cancer and Neurodegenerative Disorder Therapies
J. Funct. Biomater. 2019, 10(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb10010004
Received: 31 October 2018 / Revised: 20 December 2018 / Accepted: 28 December 2018 / Published: 8 January 2019
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (714 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Polymer nanoparticles (NPs) represent one of the most innovative non-invasive approaches for drug delivery applications. NPs main objective is to convey the therapeutic molecule be they drugs, proteins, or nucleic acids directly into the target organ or tissue. Many polymers are used for [...] Read more.
Polymer nanoparticles (NPs) represent one of the most innovative non-invasive approaches for drug delivery applications. NPs main objective is to convey the therapeutic molecule be they drugs, proteins, or nucleic acids directly into the target organ or tissue. Many polymers are used for the synthesis of NPs and among the currently most employed materials several biocompatible synthetic polymers, namely polylactic acid (PLA), poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA), and polyethylene glycol (PEG), can be cited. These molecules are made of simple monomers which are naturally present in the body and therefore easily excreted without being toxic. The present review addresses the different approaches that are most commonly adopted to synthetize biocompatible NPs to date, as well as the experimental strategies designed to load them with therapeutic agents. In fact, drugs may be internalized in the NPs or physically dispersed therein. In this paper the various types of biodegradable polymer NPs will be discussed with emphasis on their applications in drug delivery. Close attention will be devoted to the treatment of cancer, where both active and passive targeting is used to enhance efficacy and reduce systemic toxicity, and to diseases affecting the central nervous system, inasmuch as NPs can be modified to target specific cells or cross membrane barriers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Functional Nanobiomaterials)
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Open AccessReview
Biomaterials, Current Strategies, and Novel Nano-Technological Approaches for Periodontal Regeneration
J. Funct. Biomater. 2019, 10(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb10010003
Received: 27 October 2018 / Revised: 7 December 2018 / Accepted: 17 December 2018 / Published: 2 January 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4388 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Periodontal diseases involve injuries to the supporting structures of the tooth and, if left untreated, can lead to the loss of the tooth. Regenerative periodontal therapies aim, ideally, at healing all the damaged periodontal tissues and represent a significant clinical and societal challenge [...] Read more.
Periodontal diseases involve injuries to the supporting structures of the tooth and, if left untreated, can lead to the loss of the tooth. Regenerative periodontal therapies aim, ideally, at healing all the damaged periodontal tissues and represent a significant clinical and societal challenge for the current ageing population. This review provides a picture of the currently-used biomaterials for periodontal regeneration, including natural and synthetic polymers, bioceramics (e.g., calcium phosphates and bioactive glasses), and composites. Bioactive materials aim at promoting the regeneration of new healthy tissue. Polymers are often used as barrier materials in guided tissue regeneration strategies and are suitable both to exclude epithelial down-growth and to allow periodontal ligament and alveolar bone cells to repopulate the defect. The problems related to the barrier postoperative collapse can be solved by using a combination of polymeric membranes and grafting materials. Advantages and drawbacks associated with the incorporation of growth factors and nanomaterials in periodontal scaffolds are also discussed, along with the development of multifunctional and multilayer implants. Tissue-engineering strategies based on functionally-graded scaffolds are expected to play an ever-increasing role in the management of periodontal defects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Functional Nanobiomaterials)
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