Restorative Dentistry: Emerging Trends in CAD-CAM Biomaterials

A special issue of Journal of Functional Biomaterials (ISSN 2079-4983). This special issue belongs to the section "Dental Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 August 2024 | Viewed by 445

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Periodontology, Endodontology, and Cariology, University Center for Dental Medicine Basel UZB, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland
Interests: CAD–CAM; resin-based composites; restorative dentistry; dental traumatology; cariology

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Guest Editor
Department of Periodontology, Endodontology, and Cariology, University Center for Dental Medicine Basel UZB, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland
Interests: CAD–CAM; minimally invasive dentistry; aesthetic dentistry; restorative dentistry; dental traumatology; cariology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Resin-based composites with dispersed fillers, polymer-infiltrated ceramic network materials (PICNs), glass ceramics, and oxide ceramics are gaining prominence in computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) biomaterials for fabricating various dental restorations, including inlays, onlays, veneers, and crowns. These materials, each with their unique advantages, are revolutionizing restorative dentistry. While resin-based composites and PICNs offer improved machinability and increased resistance to edge chipping, ceramic materials possess high esthetic qualities, exceptional strength, or both.

Despite their benefits, challenges persist. To achieve strong bonding with CAD-CAM materials, these materials necessitate specialized surface pretreatments to enhance adhesion. There is an urgent need for in-depth research to better understand their adhesion properties and to develop methods for achieving durable bonding.

Furthermore, innovative approaches are required to explore the properties of these materials and to enhance their esthetics and performance. This also encompasses the need for data from treatment trials to provide evidence on clinical outcomes.

This Special Issue is dedicated to compiling and showcasing reviews and reports from clinical, in vitro, and in silico studies that stand out for their creativity, importance, and methodological rigor at an international level. Our goal is to support dental practitioners in providing top-tier restorative care and to propel forward research in the realm of CAD-CAM materials, enhancing both their application and effectiveness.

Dr. Florin Eggmann
Dr. Daniele Botticelli
Dr. Julia Amato
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Functional Biomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biomaterials
  • dental bonding
  • composite materials
  • hybrid ceramic
  • indirect restoration
  • permanent dental restoration
  • resin-infiltrated ceramic network material

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

11 pages, 2646 KiB  
Article
Fracture Resistance of Posterior Milled Nanoceramic Crowns after Thermomechanical Aging
by Fajer Abdulaziz Alnajjar, Arwa Jamal Alloughani, Mohammed Nasser Alhajj and Mirza Rustum Baig
J. Funct. Biomater. 2024, 15(7), 171; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb15070171 (registering DOI) - 22 Jun 2024
Viewed by 87
Abstract
Fracture resistance is an important parameter used to predict the performance of indirect dental restorations. The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the fracture load ofc0020, in comparison with the lithium disilicate crowns, after fatigue loading, for two different restoration [...] Read more.
Fracture resistance is an important parameter used to predict the performance of indirect dental restorations. The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the fracture load ofc0020, in comparison with the lithium disilicate crowns, after fatigue loading, for two different restoration occlusal thicknesses. Forty test metal dies were fabricated by duplicating a master metal model consisting of an anatomic abutment preparation of the maxillary first premolar for a single crown. The dies were divided into two groups of 20 each for the fabrication of nanoceramic (Lava Ultimate) and lithium disilicate (IPS e.max CAD) single crowns. Each material group was further divided into two sub-groups of 10 dies each, based on crown occlusal thickness, of 0.5-mm and 0.75-mm (n = 10). Dental Type V stone dies poured from polyvinyl siloxane impressions of the test metal dies were laboratory scanned in order to design and mill 40 ceramic crowns. The crowns were cemented on to the test metal dies with a self-adhesive resin luting cement. All crowns were thermocycled (2500 cycles) and mechanically loaded (250,000 cycles) in a chewing simulator followed by static loading until failure, and the values noted. The data were statistically analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD post-hoc multiple comparison tests (α = 0.05). The mean fracture loads ranged from 1022 to 1322 N for nanoceramic crowns and from 1145 to 1441 N for the lithium disilicate crowns. Two-way ANOVA revealed insignificant differences between the nanoceramic and lithium disilicate crowns (p > 0.05) in terms of fracture load. Significant differences were noted in the fracture resistance of crowns based on occlusal thickness (303 N; p = 0.013) regardless of the material used. Multiple comparisons by Tukey HSD post-hoc test showed insignificant differences between the four material-occlusal thickness groups (p > 0.05). The nanoceramic crowns were found to be comparable with lithium disilicate crowns in terms of fracture load. The mean fracture loads of all of the tested crowns were within the normal physiological masticatory load limits. Based on the fracture-resistance results, nanoceramic crowns seem to be suitable for clinical use for the tested occlusal thicknesses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Restorative Dentistry: Emerging Trends in CAD-CAM Biomaterials)
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