Special Issue "Oral Health and Systemic Diseases"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Stomatology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Dirk Ziebolz
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Cariology, Endodontology and Periodontology, University of Leipzig, Liebigstraße 12, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
Interests: oral health medicine; dental healthcare research; special care dentistry; interdisciplinary collaboration; oral and systemic disease interaction; oral health-related quality of life
Dr. Gerhard Schmalz
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Cariology, Endodontology and Periodontology, University of Leipzig, Liebigstraße 12, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
Interests: oral health medicine; dental healthcare research; special care dentistry; interdisciplinary collaboration; oral and systemic disease interaction; oral health-related quality of life

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Oral and systemic health are closely related to each other. On the one hand, oral diseases are potentially associated with different general health conditions. Thereby, an influence of oral conditions on systemic health or vice versa as well as different bidirectional relationships have been uncovered. Moreover, medications can show distinct side effects in the oral cavity, such as xerostomia or gingival overgrowth, or affect the patient’s immune system as well as bone metabolism.

On the other hand, dental care of patients with systemic diseases is a relevant issue, because a sufficient oral health situation is necessary to decrease their risk of systemic complications. However, the dental care situation of these patients is often inadequate. Patients who suffer from a severe general disease or condition often show a physical and psychological burden, making appropriate interdisciplinary care necessary. Therefore, the development and validation of special care concepts should be an object of research in oral health medicine.

This Special Issue will focus on these different aspects of oral conditions, dental care, and quality of life in the context of the relationship between oral and systemic health.

Prof. Dr. Dirk Ziebolz
Dr. Gerhard Schmalz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • oral health medicine
  • oral health
  • systemic disease
  • dental care
  • special care dentistry
  • general health
  • oral diseases
  • oral and systemic disease interaction
  • oral-health-related quality of life
  • interdisciplinary collaboration

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Apical Periodontitis and Diabetes Mellitus Type 2: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(2), 540; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9020540 - 17 Feb 2020
Abstract
Objective: Investigate if there is an association between apical periodontitis and diabetes mellitus. Material and methods: A bibliographic search was performed on Medline/PubMed, Scopus and Cochrane databases using the keywords apical periodontitis and diabetes mellitus. Published papers written in English and performed on [...] Read more.
Objective: Investigate if there is an association between apical periodontitis and diabetes mellitus. Material and methods: A bibliographic search was performed on Medline/PubMed, Scopus and Cochrane databases using the keywords apical periodontitis and diabetes mellitus. Published papers written in English and performed on animals or humans were included. Meta-analysis was performed using the OpenMeta (analyst) tool for the statistical analysis. The variables analyzed were the prevalence of Apical Periodontitis (AP) among teeth and patients with Diabetes Mellitus (DM). Results: Of the total studies found, only 21 met the inclusion criteria. Ten clinical studies on animals, ten studies on humans and a systematic review were included. Meta-analysis shows that the prevalence of teeth with apical periodontitis among patients with diabetes mellitus has an odds ratio of 1.166 corresponding to 507 teeth with AP + DM and 534 teeth with AP without DM. The prevalence of patients with AP and DM shows an odds ratio of 1.552 where 91 patients had AP + DM and 582 patients AP without DM. Conclusion: Scientific evidence suggests that there could be a common physiopathological factor between apical periodontitis and diabetes mellitus but more prospective studies are needed to investigate the association between these two diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health and Systemic Diseases)
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Open AccessArticle
Comprehensive Assessment of Orofacial Health and Disease Related Parameters in Adolescents with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis—A Cross-Sectional Study
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(2), 513; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9020513 - 13 Feb 2020
Abstract
Background: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate oral health and functional status of adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and its possible link to disease specific parameters. Methods: Patients with JIA were recruited (November 2012–October 2014) and disease specific information [...] Read more.
Background: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate oral health and functional status of adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and its possible link to disease specific parameters. Methods: Patients with JIA were recruited (November 2012–October 2014) and disease specific information was extracted from patients’ records. Oral examination included: dental findings (decayed-, missing- and filled-teeth-index (dmf-t/DMF-T)), gingival inflammation (papilla-bleeding-index (PBI)) and periodontal screening index (PSI). Functional examination followed Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). Additionally, modified Helkimo’s Clinical Dysfunction Index and radiographic scoring were recorded. Results: 59 JIA patients were included. The mean dmf-t/DMF-T was 2.6. Only one patient showed no signs of gingival inflammation, while 57.6% had a maximum PSI of 2 or less. Positive functional findings were assessed clinically in more than half of the patients. Major diagnosis by RDC/TMD was osteoarthrosis. Patients with at least one positive anamnestic or clinical functional finding revealed significantly higher radiographic scores (CI = 0.440, p = 0.022). Patients with increased c-reactive-protein had a significantly higher PBI (Z = –2.118, p = 0.034) and increased radiographic scores (CI = 0.408, p = 0.043). Conclusions: Adolescents suffering from JIA show high levels of caries experience and gingival inflammation. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is often seen in JIA patients. Consequently, special dental care programs would be recommendable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health and Systemic Diseases)
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Open AccessArticle
Lack in Periodontal Care of Patients Suffering from Severe Heart Diseases—Results after 12 Months Follow-Up
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(2), 352; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9020352 - 27 Jan 2020
Abstract
Background: To assess whether the standardized recommendation of patients with heart failure (HF), left-ventricular assist device (LVAD) and heart transplantation (HTx) to visit their dentist leads to improved oral conditions after 12 months. Methods: Patients from the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Leipzig Heart [...] Read more.
Background: To assess whether the standardized recommendation of patients with heart failure (HF), left-ventricular assist device (LVAD) and heart transplantation (HTx) to visit their dentist leads to improved oral conditions after 12 months. Methods: Patients from the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Leipzig Heart Centre, Germany were examined at baseline and after 12 months. A dental (decayed-, missing-, and filled-teeth index (DMF-T)) and periodontal examination (periodontal probing depth, clinical attachment loss) was performed. At baseline, patients received a standardized recommendation to visit their dentist. At follow-up, a standardized questionnaire regarding the dental consultation was applied. Results: Eighty-eight participants (HTx: 31, LVAD: 43, HF: 14) were included. The majority of patients (79.5%) followed the recommendation to visit their dentist. Within the total cohort, periodontal treatment need was significantly reduced from 91% (baseline) to 75% (follow-up; p < 0.01). Only 10% of total cohort stated that they received periodontal treatment. The outcome in periodontal and dental treatment need at follow-up appointment revealed no statistically significant associations to the questionnaire regarding dentist consultation (p > 0.05). Conclusions: The simple recommendation to visit the dentist appears not enough to obtain sufficient dental and periodontal conditions in patients with severe heart diseases. Thereby, a lack in periodontal treatment of patients with HF, HTx and LVAD was identified, making interdisciplinary dental special care programs recommendable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health and Systemic Diseases)
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