Special Issue "Cutaneous Melanoma: Current Diagnosis and Treatment Strategies"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Dermatology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 October 2022 | Viewed by 3522

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Aram Boada
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Dermatology, Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Spain
Interests: cutaneous melanoma; skin
Dr. Antonio Tejera-Vaquerizo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Instituto Dermatológico GlobalDerm, Palma del Rio, Cordoba, Spain
Interests: melanoma; skin cancer
Dr. Sebastian Podlipnik
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Melanoma Unit of Hospital Clínic in Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
Interests: melanoma; skin cancer
Dr. Jose Luis Manzano
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Medical Oncology of Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Spain
Interests: oncology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

If a cancer clearly exemplifies the advances that have taken place in recent years in its diagnosis and treatment, this is malignant melanoma. Among the former, the generalization in the use of dermoscopy and the development of confocal reflectance microscopy should be highlighted. Moreover, there have also been advances in the study of prognostic factors of melanoma, with the development of gene expression profiles tests that nowadays complement and perhaps in the near future will end up replacing the classic staging methods.

Advances in treatment have focused on two areas. On the one hand in the development of new medical treatments (immunotherapy and target therapy) for advanced disease. On the other, changes in the surgical approach of patients with melanoma: the limitation of the indication of complete lymph node dissection in cases with a clinically detected lymph node metastasis and the reassesment of sentinel lymph node biopsy as a technique that provides prognostic information but does not change survival.

The aim of this Special Issue is to present recent advances in these fields. Investigations covering the above-cited areas will be our primary focus, however, other areas of interest to the theme are also welcome.

The Special Issue entitled “Cutaneous Melanoma: Current Diagnosis and Treatment Strategies” is now open for submissions, welcoming papers covering the above-cited areas.

Dr. Aram Boada
Dr. Antonio Tejera-Vaquerizo
Dr. Sebastian Podlipnik
Dr. Jose Luis Manzano
Guest Editor
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Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Dermoscopy
  • Confocal microscopy
  • Gene expression profile tests
  • Sentinel lymph node biopsy
  • Complete lymph node dissection
  • Adjuvant therapy
  • Neoadjuvant therapy
  • Inmunotherapy
  • Target therapy

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Multiple Primary Melanomas: Retrospective Review in a Tertiary Care Hospital
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(9), 2355; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11092355 - 22 Apr 2022
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Abstract
Multiple primary melanomas (MPM) refer to the occurrence of more than one synchronous or metachronous melanoma in the same individual. The aim of this study was to identify the frequency of MPM and describe the clinical and histopathologic characteristics of patients with MPM. [...] Read more.
Multiple primary melanomas (MPM) refer to the occurrence of more than one synchronous or metachronous melanoma in the same individual. The aim of this study was to identify the frequency of MPM and describe the clinical and histopathologic characteristics of patients with MPM. An observational single-center retrospective study was designed based on a cohort of melanoma patients followed in a tertiary care hospital. Fifty-eight (8.9%) patients developed MPM. Most patients were men (65.5%) and the median age at the time of diagnosis of the first melanoma was 71 years old. The median time of diagnosis of the second melanoma from the first melanoma was 10.9 months, and 77.6% of second melanomas were diagnosed within the first 5 years. In total, 29 (50%) and 28 (48.3%) first and second melanomas were located in the trunk, respectively. Concordance of anatomic site between primary and subsequent melanoma was found in 46.6% of the patients. Proportion of in situ melanomas was increasingly higher in subsequent melanomas (from 36.21% of first melanomas to 100% of fifth melanomas). An increasing rate of melanomas with histological regression was observed within subsequent melanomas (from 60.3% of first melanomas to 80% of third melanomas). Our results support the importance of careful long-term follow-up with total body examination in melanoma patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cutaneous Melanoma: Current Diagnosis and Treatment Strategies)
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Article
Long-Term Outcomes of Targeted Therapy after First-Line Immunotherapy in BRAF-Mutated Advanced Cutaneous Melanoma Patients—Real-World Evidence
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(8), 2239; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11082239 - 17 Apr 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 902
Abstract
Background: Currently, limited data on targeted therapy and immunotherapy sequencing in patients with BRAF-mutant melanoma is available. Targeted therapy and immunotherapy are expected to be comparable in terms of overall survival (OS) when used as second-line therapies; therefore, understanding the characteristics of [...] Read more.
Background: Currently, limited data on targeted therapy and immunotherapy sequencing in patients with BRAF-mutant melanoma is available. Targeted therapy and immunotherapy are expected to be comparable in terms of overall survival (OS) when used as second-line therapies; therefore, understanding the characteristics of patients who completed sequential treatment is needed. Methods: The primary objective of this study was to analyze the efficacy of BRAFi/MEKi activity as second-line therapy in patients with advanced melanoma. We also aimed to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with advanced melanoma who were treated sequentially with immunotherapy and targeted therapy. We enrolled 97 patients treated between 1st December 2015 and 31st December 2020 with first-line immunotherapy with programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) checkpoint inhibitors; and for the second-line treatment with at least one cycle of BRAFi/MEKi therapy with follow-up through 31 January 2022. Results: Median OS since first-line treatment initiation was 19.9 months and 12.8 months since initiation of BRAFi/MEKi treatment. All BRAFi/MRKi combinations were similarly effective. Median progression free survival (PFS) was 7.5 months since initiation of any BRAFi/MEKi treatment. Conclusions: BRAFi/MEKi therapy is effective in the second-line in advanced and metastatic melanoma patients. For the first time, the efficacy of all BRAFi/MEKi combinations as second-line therapy is shown. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cutaneous Melanoma: Current Diagnosis and Treatment Strategies)
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Article
Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy vs. Observation in Thin Melanoma: A Multicenter Propensity Score Matching Study
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(24), 5878; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10245878 - 15 Dec 2021
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Abstract
The therapeutic value of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in thin melanoma remains controversial. The aim of this study is to determine the role of SLNB in the survival of thin melanomas (≤1 mm). A multicenter retrospective observational study was designed. A propensity [...] Read more.
The therapeutic value of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in thin melanoma remains controversial. The aim of this study is to determine the role of SLNB in the survival of thin melanomas (≤1 mm). A multicenter retrospective observational study was designed. A propensity score matching was performed to compare patients who underwent SLNB vs. observation. A multivariate Cox regression was used. A total of 1438 patients were matched by propensity score. There were no significant differences in melanoma-specific survival (MSS) between the SLNB and observation groups. Predictors of MSS in the multivariate model were age, tumor thickness, ulceration, and interferon treatment. Results were similar for disease-free survival and overall survival. The 5- and 10-year MSS rates for SLN-negative and -positive patients were 98.5% vs. 77.3% (p < 0.001) and 97.3% vs. 68.7% (p < 0.001), respectively. SLNB does not improve MSS in patients with thin melanoma. It also had no impact on DSF or OS. However, a considerable difference in MSS, DFS, and OS between SLN-positive and -negative patients exists, confirming its value as a prognostic procedure and therefore we recommend discussing the option of SLNB with patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cutaneous Melanoma: Current Diagnosis and Treatment Strategies)
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Review

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Review
Survival of Women Previously Diagnosed of Melanoma with Subsequent Pregnancy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis and a Single-Center Experience
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(1), 83; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11010083 - 24 Dec 2021
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Abstract
Melanoma incidence has increased over the last few decades. How the prognosis of a previously diagnosed melanoma may be affected by a woman’s subsequent pregnancy has been debated in the literature since the 1950s, and the outcomes are essential to women who are [...] Read more.
Melanoma incidence has increased over the last few decades. How the prognosis of a previously diagnosed melanoma may be affected by a woman’s subsequent pregnancy has been debated in the literature since the 1950s, and the outcomes are essential to women who are melanoma survivors in their childbearing years. The main objective of this systematic review is to improve the understanding of whether the course of melanoma in a woman may be altered by a subsequent pregnancy and to help clinicians’ diagnosis. Eligible studies for the systematic review were clinical trials, observational cohort studies and case-control studies that compared prognosis outcomes for non-pregnant patients with melanoma, or pregnant before melanoma diagnosis, versus pregnant patients after a diagnosis of melanoma. The search strategy yielded 1101 articles, of which 4 met the inclusion criteria for the systematic review. All the studies were retrospective non-randomised cohorts with patients with melanomas diagnosed before pregnancy. According to our findings, a subsequent pregnancy was not a significant influence on the outcome of a previous melanoma. However, given the small number of identified studies and the heterogeneous data included, it is recommended to approach these patients with caution, and counselling should be given by known prognostic factors. We also reviewed the medical records of 84 patients of childbearing age (35.8 ± 6.3 years, range 21–45 years) who were diagnosed with cutaneous invasive melanoma in our hospital between 2008 and 2018 (N = 724). Of these, 11 (13.1%) had a pregnancy after melanoma diagnosis (age at pregnancy: 35.6 ± 6.3 years). No statistical differences in outcome were detected. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cutaneous Melanoma: Current Diagnosis and Treatment Strategies)
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