Special Issue "Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic: Current Knowledge and Future Perspectives"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Infectious Diseases".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Harriet Corvol
Website
Guest Editor
(1) Pediatric Pulmonology Department, Reference Center for Rare Lung Diseases (RespiRare), Armand Trousseau Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Paris, France
(2) Sorbonne Université, Inserm, Centre de Recherche Saint Antoine (CRSA), Paris, France
Interests: pediatrics, respiratory diseases; respiratory infectious diseases; genetics; cystic fibrosis; phenomics; modifier genes; interstitial lung diseases; surfactant disorders; lung fibrosis; COVID-19; SARS-CoV-2
Dr. Nadia Nathan

Guest Editor
(1) Pediatric Pulmonology Department, Reference Center for Rare Lung Diseases (RespiRare), Armand Trousseau Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), 75012 Paris, France
(2) Sorbonne Université, Inserm UMRS933, Paris, France
Interests: pediatrics, respiratory diseases; respiratory infectious diseases; genetics; interstitial lung diseases; surfactant disorders; pulmonary fibrosis; COVID-19; SARS-CoV-2

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since December 2019, the COVID-19 pandemic has spread over the world and there have been more than two million confirmed cases. This new coronavirus with a high degree of pathogenicity first infected China through an animal-to-human transmission. A few months later, thousands of patients worldwide need intensive care management and billions of individuals are living under national lockdowns. No one is spared from the medical, psychological, and economic ravages of this pandemic. International efforts of the scientific community are directed towards finding effective treatments and vaccine against SARS-CoV-2. In this Special Issue, we invite original research articles and state-of-the-art reviews focused on current knowledge and future perspectives on SARS-CoV-2 (including physiopathology, virology, biology, epidemiology, transmission, etc.); COVID-19 phenotypic expression (in the general population as well as in specific populations such as children); diagnostic and therapeutic approaches; biomarkers of disease severity and of treatment response, etc. We are also interested in studies and reviews evaluating the positive and negative effects of the various national crisis management approaches and their psychological impacts.

Prof. Dr. Harriet Corvol
Dr. Nadia Nathan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • SARS-CoV-2
  • COVID-19
  • pandemic
  • pediatrics
  • epidemiology
  • pathophysiology
  • diagnostic tools
  • therapeutic perspectives
  • biomarkers
  • psychological impact

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Vaccines and Therapies in Development for SARS-CoV-2 Infections
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(6), 1885; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9061885 - 16 Jun 2020
Abstract
The current COVID-19 pandemic is caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. The virus causes severe respiratory symptoms which manifest disproportionately in the elderly. Currently, there are over 6.5 million cases and 380,000 deaths reported. Given the current severity of the outbreak, there is [...] Read more.
The current COVID-19 pandemic is caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. The virus causes severe respiratory symptoms which manifest disproportionately in the elderly. Currently, there are over 6.5 million cases and 380,000 deaths reported. Given the current severity of the outbreak, there is a great need for antiviral therapies and vaccines to treat and prevent COVID-19. In this review, we provide an overview of SARS-CoV-2 and discuss the emerging therapies and vaccines that show promise in combating COVID-19. We also highlight potential viral targets that could be exploited by researchers and drug manufacturers. Full article
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Open AccessReview
COVID-19: Specific and Non-Specific Clinical Manifestations and Symptoms: The Current State of Knowledge
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(6), 1753; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9061753 - 05 Jun 2020
Abstract
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), due to the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), has become an epidemiological threat and a worldwide concern. SARS-CoV-2 has spread to 210 countries worldwide and more than 6,500,000 confirmed cases and 384,643 deaths have been reported, while the [...] Read more.
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), due to the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), has become an epidemiological threat and a worldwide concern. SARS-CoV-2 has spread to 210 countries worldwide and more than 6,500,000 confirmed cases and 384,643 deaths have been reported, while the number of both confirmed and fatal cases is continually increasing. COVID-19 is a viral disease that can affect every age group—from infants to the elderly—resulting in a wide spectrum of various clinical manifestations. COVID-19 might present different degrees of severity—from mild or even asymptomatic carriers, even to fatal cases. The most common complications include pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Fever, dry cough, muscle weakness, and chest pain are the most prevalent and typical symptoms of COVID-19. However, patients might also present atypical symptoms that can occur alone, which might indicate the possible SARS-CoV-2 infection. The aim of this paper is to review and summarize all of the findings regarding clinical manifestations of COVID-19 patients, which include respiratory, neurological, olfactory and gustatory, gastrointestinal, ophthalmic, dermatological, cardiac, and rheumatologic manifestations, as well as specific symptoms in pediatric patients. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Point-of-Care Diagnostic Tests for Detecting SARS-CoV-2 Antibodies: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Real-World Data
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(5), 1515; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9051515 - 18 May 2020
Abstract
SARS-CoV-2 is responsible for a highly contagious infection, known as COVID-19. SARS-CoV-2 was discovered in late December 2019 and, since then, has become a global pandemic. Timely and accurate COVID-19 laboratory testing is an essential step in the management of the COVID-19 outbreak. [...] Read more.
SARS-CoV-2 is responsible for a highly contagious infection, known as COVID-19. SARS-CoV-2 was discovered in late December 2019 and, since then, has become a global pandemic. Timely and accurate COVID-19 laboratory testing is an essential step in the management of the COVID-19 outbreak. To date, assays based on the reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in respiratory samples are the gold standard for COVID-19 diagnosis. Unfortunately, RT-PCR has several practical limitations. Consequently, alternative diagnostic methods are urgently required, both for alleviating the pressure on laboratories and healthcare facilities and for expanding testing capacity to enable large-scale screening and ensure a timely therapeutic intervention. To date, few studies have been conducted concerning the potential utilization of rapid testing for COVID-19, with some conflicting results. Therefore, the present systematic review and meta-analysis was undertaken to explore the feasibility of rapid diagnostic tests in the management of the COVID-19 outbreak. Based on ten studies, we computed a pooled sensitivity of 64.8% (95%CI 54.5–74.0), and specificity of 98.0% (95%CI 95.8–99.0), with high heterogeneity and risk of reporting bias. We can conclude that: (1) rapid diagnostic tests for COVID-19 are necessary, but should be adequately sensitive and specific; (2) few studies have been carried out to date; (3) the studies included are characterized by low numbers and low sample power, and (4) in light of these results, the use of available tests is currently questionable for clinical purposes and cannot substitute other more reliable molecular tests, such as assays based on RT-PCR. Full article
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