Special Issue "New Frontiers in Psoriasis: From Immunogenetics to the Concept of Endotypes"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Dermatology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Giovanni Damiani
Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Dermatology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA
2. Young Dermatologists Italian Network (YDIN), GISED Study Centre, 24121, Bergamo, Italy
3. Clinical Dermatology, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, 20161, Milan, Italy
4. Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, University of Milan, 20122, Milan, Italy
Interests: psoriasis; hidradenitis suppurativa; systemic inflammation; dermatoepidemiology; multi-omics integration; machine learning; artificial intelligence; big data; biologics; systemic treatments

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Psoriasis is now a well-known systemic inflammatory disease that heavily impacts patients' quality of life; however, several efficacious treatments are currently available. Despite the latest therapeutic and biological advances, determining the most suitable drug for a patient (precision medicine) continues to be challenging.

Recently omics, big data, immunogenetics, and artificial intelligence have contributed to making precision medicine possible; in fact, all these technologies have allowed clinicians to better cluster psoriatic patients susceptible to responding to certain drugs or developing complications.

These clusters of clinical, biological, genetic, and therapeutic characteristics depict the endotypes.

This new approach is also of paramount importance in order to decrease healthcare costs related to anti-psoriatic drugs unresponsiveness, lack of response, and complications.

Within this Special Issue of the Journal of Clinical Medicine, we invite you to describe the state-of-the-art for psoriasis care, new therapeutical strategies omics-based, big data, and artificial intelligence contributions in psoriasis precision medicine.

We welcome both lab-based and dermatoepidemiological studies that may shed light on new therapeutic approaches in psoriasis care.

Dr. Giovanni Damiani
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Psoriasis
  • Hidradenitis suppurativa
  • Systemic inflammation
  • Dermatoepidemiology
  • Multi-omics integration
  • Machine learning
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Big-data
  • Biologics
  • Systemic treatments

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Methotrexate Decreases the Level of PCSK9—A Novel Indicator of the Risk of Proatherogenic Lipid Profile in Psoriasis. The Preliminary Data
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(4), 910; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9040910 - 26 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Background: Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) exerts an important role in inflammatory processes, lipids homeostasis, and cardiometabolic disorders that are closely associated with psoriasis. The aim of the study was to analyze the clinical and diagnostic value of serum PCSK9 concentrations and [...] Read more.
Background: Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) exerts an important role in inflammatory processes, lipids homeostasis, and cardiometabolic disorders that are closely associated with psoriasis. The aim of the study was to analyze the clinical and diagnostic value of serum PCSK9 concentrations and their connections with disease severity, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, and impact of systemic therapies in psoriatic patients. The study enrolled thirty-five patients with active plaque-type psoriasis and eighteen healthy volunteers served as controls. Blood samples were obtained before and after 12 weeks of treatment with methotrexate or acitretin. Serum PCSK9 concentrations were measured by the ELISA (Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay) commercial kits. Morphological and biochemical parameters were assayed using routine laboratory techniques. Psoriatic patients showed significantly elevated levels of PCSK9 compared to controls (p < 0.01), mostly in patients with a mild and moderate course of psoriasis. PCSK9 concentrations correlated positively with BMI and triglyceride levels (p < 0.05). Interestingly, PCSK9 had a strong negative correlation with low-density lipoprotein levels and total cholesterol (p < 0.05). Three months of monotherapy with methotrexate significantly reduced PCSK9 level (p < 0.05), on the contrary, the acitretin group showed a further increase of PCSK9 levels (p < 0.05). PCSK9 seems to be a novel marker of psoriasis and a putative explanation of lipid disturbances, which are common in patients with psoriasis and are vital for the further developing of metabolic syndrome. Methotrexate should be considered as a treatment of choice in patients with an elevated PCSK9 concentration. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis Cardiovascular Disease Endotypes Identified by Red Blood Cell Distribution Width and Mean Platelet Volume
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(1), 186; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9010186 - 09 Jan 2020
Cited by 3
Abstract
In a subset of psoriasis (PsO) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients, the skin and/or joint lesions appear to generate biologically significant systemic inflammation. Red cell distribution width (RDW) and mean platelet volume (MPV) are readily available clinical tests that reflect responses of the [...] Read more.
In a subset of psoriasis (PsO) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients, the skin and/or joint lesions appear to generate biologically significant systemic inflammation. Red cell distribution width (RDW) and mean platelet volume (MPV) are readily available clinical tests that reflect responses of the bone marrow and/or plasma thrombogenicity (e.g., inflammation), and can be markers for major adverse cardiac events (MACE). We aimed to evaluate if RDW and MPV may be employed as inexpensive, routinely obtained biomarkers in predicting myocardial infarction (MI), atrial fibrillation (AF), and chronic heart failure (CHF) in psoriatic and psoriatic arthritis patients. The study was divided into two parts: (a) case control study employing big data (Explorys) to assess MPV and RDW in psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis and control cohorts; (b) a clinical observational study to validate the predictive value of RDW and to evaluate RDW response to anti-psoriatic therapies. We used Explorys, an aggregate electronic database, to identify psoriatic patients with available MPV and RDW data and compared them to gender and age matched controls. The incidence of myocardial infarction (MI), atrial fibrillation (AF), and chronic heart failure (CHF) was highest among patients with both elevated RDW and MPV, followed by patients with high RDW and normal MPV. RDW elevation among PsA patients was associated with an increased risk of MI, AF, and CHF. In a local clinical cohort, high RDWs were concentrated in a subset of patients who also had elevated circulating resistin levels. Among a small subset of participants who were treated with various systemic and biologic therapies, and observed over a year, and in whom RDW was elevated at baseline, a sustained response to therapy was associated with a decrease in RDW. RDW and MPV, tests commonly contained within routine complete blood count (CBC), may be a cost-effective manner to identify PsO and PsA patients at increased risk of MACE. Full article
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