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Special Issue "Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapy: A New Era"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Cell Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Celalettin Ustun

Division of Hematology, Oncology and Transplantation, Rush University, 600 S. Paulina St., Chicago, Il 60612, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: hematopoietic cell transplantation; allogeneic; graft-versus-host disease; organ-health evaluations before transplantation; alternative donors; cellular therapy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In this Special Issue, we will try to capture all the new and exciting developments in “old” hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and “new” cellular therapy. In HCT, there are significant changes, especially in alternative donors (e.g., haploidentical transplantation and umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation). The use of haploidentical transplantation has been increasing while UCB transplantation is declining. However, it does not mean UCB HCT has no place in the HCT world any longer. The differences between UCB HCT immune recovery and other resources could be beneficial. Translational research is still on-going in UCB HCT. What needs to be done to improve haploidentical HCT? There are new, FDA approved drugs for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after decades with no development, new agents are actively investigated in GVHD prophylaxis studies. Two industrial CAR T cells have been approved for lymphoid malignancies already. Many studies are underway for patients with hematologic malignancies. What is happening in supportive care, infectious disease relevant to HCT?

In this very exciting era of HCT and cellular therapy, experts will share literature reviews, their own experiences, and comments in this Special Issue.

Dr. Celalettin Ustun
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Hematopoietic cell transplantation
  • Cellular therapy
  • Haploidentical transplantation
  • Umbilical cord blood
  • Translational research
  • Graft-versus-host diseases
  • Hematologic malignancies
  • Lymphoid malignancies
  • CAR T cells

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Pretransplant Cardiac Evaluation Using Novel Technology
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(5), 690; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8050690
Received: 25 April 2019 / Revised: 11 May 2019 / Accepted: 14 May 2019 / Published: 16 May 2019
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Abstract
Hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) is a complex procedure that has been increasingly successful in treating malignant and nonmalignant conditions. Despite its effectiveness, it can be associated with potentially life-threatening adverse effects. New onset heart failure, ischemic disease, and arrhythmias are among the most [...] Read more.
Hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) is a complex procedure that has been increasingly successful in treating malignant and nonmalignant conditions. Despite its effectiveness, it can be associated with potentially life-threatening adverse effects. New onset heart failure, ischemic disease, and arrhythmias are among the most notable cardiovascular complications post-HSCT. As a result, appropriate cardiac risk stratification prior to transplant could result in decreased morbidity and mortality by identifying patients with a higher probability of tolerating possible toxicities associated with HSCT. In this review, we aim to discuss the utility of cardiac screening using novel modalities of imaging technology in the pre-HSCT phase. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapy: A New Era)
Figures

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Open AccessReview
Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cells: The Future Is Now
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(2), 207; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8020207
Received: 15 January 2019 / Revised: 29 January 2019 / Accepted: 31 January 2019 / Published: 7 February 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (584 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The immune system acting via cancer immune-surveillance is considered a potential target for improving outcomes among some malignancies. The ability to harness immune cells, engineer them and educate them to target cancer cells has changed the paradigm for treating non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas (NHL) and [...] Read more.
The immune system acting via cancer immune-surveillance is considered a potential target for improving outcomes among some malignancies. The ability to harness immune cells, engineer them and educate them to target cancer cells has changed the paradigm for treating non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas (NHL) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy has shown remarkable anti-tumor activity against refractory B cell malignancies. Ongoing research aims to expand the scope of this adoptive cell therapy, understanding mechanisms of resistance and reducing toxicity. In this review, we will discuss the current scope of CAR T-cell therapy and ongoing future applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapy: A New Era)
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J. Clin. Med. EISSN 2077-0383 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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