New Advances in Uterus and Ovarian Transplantation

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Obstetrics & Gynecology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 May 2024 | Viewed by 1755

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Obstetrics and Gynecology and Women’s Health Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA
Interests: uterus transplantation; gynaecological surgery; endometriosis; IVF; fibroids; reproductive medicine; laparoscopic surgery; assisted reproductive technology; reproductive endocrinology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As the Guest Editor of this Special Issue, I invite you to submit your novel research and reviews pertaining to uterus and ovary transplantation. In this Special Issue, we will seek to explore the next questions in the field, including, but not limited to, the following: tissue bioengineering; challenging cases in reproductive transplants either due to oncologic, technical, or ethical concerns; new techniques and surgical innovation; expanding access to reproductive transplants, including transgender individuals; cost effectiveness and payment for reproductive transplant services; and calls to action for research needed in these innovative fields. As a journal of general scientific interest that is not solely restricted to transplant surgery or reproductive medicine, this Special Issue in the Journal of Clinical Medicine will bring together a multidisciplinary group of authors to highlight what is next on the horizon. Your contributions are greatly needed.

Dr. Elliott G. Richards
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • uterus transplantation
  • gynaecological surgery
  • endometriosis
  • IVF
  • fibroids
  • reproductive medicine
  • laparoscopic surgery
  • assisted reproductive technology
  • reproductive endocrinology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 1584 KiB  
Article
Awareness and Interest in Uterus Transplantation over Time: Analysis of Those Seeking Surgical Correction for Uterine-Factor Infertility in the US
by Liza Johannesson, Giuliano Testa, Menas M. Beshara, Briget da Graca, Jessica R. Walter, Cristiano Quintini, Nawar Latif, Koji Hashimoto, Elliott G. Richards and Kathleen O’Neill
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(13), 4201; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12134201 - 21 Jun 2023
Viewed by 864
Abstract
This study describes the characteristics of women who contacted an active program performing uterus transplantation (UTx) in the US, expressing interest in becoming a uterus transplant recipient or a living donor. Basic demographic and self-reported clinical information was collected from women who contacted [...] Read more.
This study describes the characteristics of women who contacted an active program performing uterus transplantation (UTx) in the US, expressing interest in becoming a uterus transplant recipient or a living donor. Basic demographic and self-reported clinical information was collected from women who contacted any of the three US UTx programs from 2015 to July 2022. The three centers received 5194 inquiries about becoming a UTx recipient during the study timeframe. Among those reporting a cause of infertility, almost all of the reports (4066/4331, 94%) were absence of a uterus, either congenitally (794/4066, 20%) or secondary to hysterectomy (3272/4066, 80%). The mean age was 34 years, and 49% (2545/5194) had at least one child at the time of application. The two centers using living donors received 2217 inquiries about becoming living donors. The mean age was 34 years, and 60% (1330/2217) had given birth to ≥1 child. While most of the UTx clinical trial evidence has focused on young women with congenital absence of the uterus, these results show interest from a much broader patient population in terms of age, cause of infertility, and parity. These results raise questions about whether and to what extent the indications and eligibility criteria for UTx should be expanded as the procedure transitions from the experimental phase to being offered as a clinical treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Uterus and Ovarian Transplantation)
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13 pages, 294 KiB  
Review
Living-Donor Uterus Transplantation: A Clinical Review
by Massimiliano Veroux, Paolo Scollo, Martina Maria Giambra, Giuseppe Roscitano, Alessia Giaquinta, Francesco Setacci and Pierfrancesco Veroux
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(3), 775; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13030775 - 29 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 591
Abstract
Uterus transplantation (UTx) is currently the only available treatment for absolute uterine factor infertility. More than 90 uterus transplantations have been performed worldwide, mostly from living donors. Living-donor (LD) UTx is a challenging surgical procedure since it poses ethical issues, and it is [...] Read more.
Uterus transplantation (UTx) is currently the only available treatment for absolute uterine factor infertility. More than 90 uterus transplantations have been performed worldwide, mostly from living donors. Living-donor (LD) UTx is a challenging surgical procedure since it poses ethical issues, and it is a high-risk and invasive surgery with higher hysterectomy-related risks compared to conventional hysterectomy. A total of 59 living-donor hysterectomies have been reported in the literature, including 35 performed with a laparotomic approach, 20 with a robotic approach and 4 with a laparoscopic approach. The mean donor age was 45.6 ± 9.1 years, and 22 were unrelated with the recipients, 34 were emotionally related (27 mothers, 5 sisters, 2 mother’s sisters). The mean recipient age was 28.8 ± 4.5 years. Mayer–Rokitansky–Küster–Hauser syndrome was the most common indication for uterus transplant. Robotic living-donor hysterectomy had the longest operative time but resulted in a lower blood loss and postoperative stay compared to laparotomic and laparoscopic approaches. Twenty-nine births from LD-UTx have been reported, four after robotic living-donor hysterectomy and twenty-five after a laparotomic procedure. UTx is now an effective treatment for women with UFI. While living-donor UTx in some cases may be considered an experimental procedure, it offers the extraordinary possibility to give women the opportunity to have a pregnancy. Many efforts should be made to reduce the potential risks for donors, including the use of mini-invasive techniques, and the efficacy of UTx in the recipients, giving the potential harm of immunosuppression in a recipient of a non-life-saving organ. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Advances in Uterus and Ovarian Transplantation)
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