Advances in Pediatric Anesthesiology

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Pediatrics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 November 2024 | Viewed by 1059

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Anesthesiology, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA
Interests: pediatric anesthesiology; anesthesia; perioperative anesthesia; general anesthesia in children; pediatric deep sedation; anesthesia and safety outside the operating room; dental sedation; sedation; target-controlled infusion (TCI)
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to invite authors to contribute to a Special Issue on Advances in Pediatric Anesthesiology, focused on exploring the latest developments and challenges in this field. This Special Issue aims to create a comprehensive resource that addresses various aspects of pediatric anesthesia, including pharmacokinetics, patient monitoring, pain management, and perioperative care.

The field of pediatric anesthesiology requires a tailored approach to anesthesia administration and management due to the unique physiological considerations in children. Meanwhile, understanding and utilizing appropriate patient monitoring techniques are pivotal for optimizing pediatric anesthesia outcomes. Effective pain management in children undergoing surgical procedures is of the utmost importance for their well-being and recovery. We invite authors to contribute research and perspectives on various multimodal analgesia techniques and regional anesthesia approaches that can mitigate postoperative pain.

Additionally, this Special Issue aims to highlight the significance of perioperative care in pediatric anesthesiology. Authors are welcome to share insights into best practices for preoperative optimization, intraoperative protocols, and postoperative recovery strategies. The role of a multidisciplinary team approach, involving surgeons, anesthesiologists, and so on, will be underscored to emphasize the comprehensive perioperative management required for successful outcomes.

We welcome both solicited and unsolicited submissions contributing to our goal.

Dr. Keira Mason
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pediatric anesthesiology
  • anesthesia
  • pediatric deep sedation
  • perioperative anesthesia
  • general anesthesia

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 871 KiB  
Article
Effect of Preoperative Clear Liquid Consumption on Postoperative Recovery in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Minimally Invasive Repair of Pectus Excavatum: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Study
by Jaewon Huh, Jung-Min Koo, Minju Kim, Hoon Choi, Hyung-Joo Park, Gong-Min Rim and Wonjung Hwang
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(12), 3593; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13123593 - 19 Jun 2024
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Abstract
Background/Objectives: Preoperative fasting guidelines traditionally aim to reduce pulmonary aspiration risk. However, concerns over the adverse effects of prolonged fasting have led to exploring alternatives. This study aimed to investigate the impact of preoperative clear liquid intake on postoperative outcomes in children [...] Read more.
Background/Objectives: Preoperative fasting guidelines traditionally aim to reduce pulmonary aspiration risk. However, concerns over the adverse effects of prolonged fasting have led to exploring alternatives. This study aimed to investigate the impact of preoperative clear liquid intake on postoperative outcomes in children undergoing minimally invasive repair of pectus excavatum (MIRPE). Methods: A prospective randomized controlled study was conducted on children aged 3–6 years scheduled for elective MIRPE. Patients were randomized into either a routine overnight fasting group (NPO) or a clear liquid group. The incidence and severity of emergence delirium (ED) were assessed using Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium (PAED) and Watcha scales at recovery room. Postoperative pain scores and opioid requirements were evaluated at intervals of 1–6 h, 6–12 h, and 12–24 h after surgery. Results: Fasting time was 178.6 ± 149.5 min and 608.9 ± 148.4 min in the clear liquid group compared and NPO group, respectively. The incidence of ED, measured by PAED and Watcha scales, was lower in the clear liquid group (PAED score ≥ 12: 55.6% vs. 85.2%, p = 0.037; Watcha score ≥ 3: 51.9% vs. 85.2%, p = 0.019). The highest PAED score recorded in the recovery room was significantly lower in the clear liquid group (11.4 ± 2.8 vs. 14.6 ± 2.8, p < 0.001). Clear liquid group showed significantly lower pain scores at 1–6, 6–12, and 12–24 h postoperatively. Additionally, clear liquid group had lower opioid requirement at 1–6 and 6–12 h postoperatively. Conclusions: Preoperative clear liquid consumption was associated with a lower incidence of ED in pediatric patients undergoing MIRPE. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Pediatric Anesthesiology)
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9 pages, 699 KiB  
Article
Correlation of Comfort Score and Narcotrend Index during Procedural Sedation with Midazolam and Propofol in Children
by Nora Bruns, Carolina A. Joist, Constantin M. Joist, Anna Daniels, Ursula Felderhoff-Müser, Christian Dohna-Schwake and Eva Tschiedel
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(5), 1483; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13051483 - 4 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Background/Objectives: Precise assessment of hypnotic depth in children during procedural sedation with preserved spontaneous breathing is challenging. The Narcotrendindex (NI) offers uninterrupted information by continuous electrocortical monitoring without the need to apply a stimulus with the risk of assessment-induced arousal. This study aimed [...] Read more.
Background/Objectives: Precise assessment of hypnotic depth in children during procedural sedation with preserved spontaneous breathing is challenging. The Narcotrendindex (NI) offers uninterrupted information by continuous electrocortical monitoring without the need to apply a stimulus with the risk of assessment-induced arousal. This study aimed to explore the correlation between NI and the Comfort Scale (CS) during procedural sedation with midazolam and propofol and to identify an NI target range for deep sedation. Methods: A prospective observational study was conducted on 176 children (6 months to 17.9 years) undergoing procedural sedation with midazolam premedication and continuous propofol infusion. Statistical analyses included Pearson correlation of NI and CS values, logistic regression, and receiver operating curves. Results: Median NI values varied with CS and age. The correlation coefficient between CS and NI was 0.50 and slightly higher in procedure-specific subgroup analyses. The optimal NI cut-off for deep sedation was between 50 and 60 depending on the analyzed subgroup and displayed high positive predictive values for sufficient sedation throughout. Conclusion: Our study found a moderate correlation between NI and CS, demonstrating reliable identification of adequately sedated patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Pediatric Anesthesiology)
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