Special Issue "The Borderless "Bug" Characterization of Invasive Insect Species: The First Step for Their Control"

A special issue of Insects (ISSN 2075-4450).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Umberto Bernardo
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
CNR, Institute for Sustainable Plant Protection, 80055 Portici, Italy
Interests: biological control; endosymbionts; integrative taxonomy; invasive species
Dr. Marco Gebiola
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, USA
Interests: integrative taxonomy; evolutionary biology; insect-plant interaction; biological control

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

The number of invasive insect species is continuously rising at the global level. As this process is a continuous one, the acquisition of information about invasive species also requires an incessant effort. Even if the majority of these species in their native area are well known and characterized, both genetically and biologically, when they establish in a new environment, they can undergo molecular, biological and ecological changes and adaptations that are still poorly characterized and whose mechanisms are largely unknown.

In addition to well-studied invasive species, often found in quarantine lists, many others are still poorly or even completely uncharacterized. These species, arriving in a new territory without a long period of coevolution with the complex of natural antagonists and with their hosts, succeed in imposing themselves and becoming harmful.

The in-depth knowledge of morphological, biological, ecological, and genetic characteristics of invasive insects in both native and introduced areas is a critical first step toward their management.

This Special Issue will focus on contributions that can provide an integrative characterization of invasive insects and their new antagonists, representing the foundation in the development or the improvement of control strategies.

Dr. Umberto Bernardo
Dr. Marco Gebiola
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Insects is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antagonists
  • morpho-bio-molecular characterization
  • Integrative taxonomy
  • Invasive

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Population Monitoring, Egg Parasitoids, and Genetic Structure of the Invasive Litchi Stink Bug, Tessaratoma papillosa in Taiwan
Insects 2020, 11(10), 690; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11100690 - 12 Oct 2020
Abstract
Here we assessed population dynamics, natural enemy fauna (with emphasis on egg parasitoid), and population genetic structure (based on mitochondrial DNA) of the invasive litchi stink bug (LSB), Tessaratoma papillosa in Taiwan. Our major findings include: (1) fluctuations of LSB in numbers of [...] Read more.
Here we assessed population dynamics, natural enemy fauna (with emphasis on egg parasitoid), and population genetic structure (based on mitochondrial DNA) of the invasive litchi stink bug (LSB), Tessaratoma papillosa in Taiwan. Our major findings include: (1) fluctuations of LSB in numbers of adults, mating pairs, and egg masses over a 2-year period in Taiwan generally resemble those in the native populations; (2) Anastatusdexingensis and A. fulloi are among the most dominant LSB egg parasitoids, with the former consistently outnumbering the latter throughout Taiwan; (3) the presence of two genetically distinct clades suggests LSB in Taiwan most likely derived from multiple invasions. All these data practically improve our understanding of this invasive insect pest, particularly its ecological and genetic characteristics in the introduced area, which represents critical baseline information for the design of future integrated pest management strategies. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Factors Affecting the Reproduction and Mass-Rearing of Sclerodermus brevicornis (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae), a Natural Enemy of Exotic Flat-Faced Longhorn Beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Lamiinae)
Insects 2020, 11(10), 657; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11100657 - 24 Sep 2020
Abstract
Many species of long-horned beetles are invasive pests causing significant economic damage in agro-forestry systems. They spend the majority of their life-cycle concealed inside natural wood or wooden packaging materials and are largely protected from adverse environmental conditions and pesticide sprays. Biological control [...] Read more.
Many species of long-horned beetles are invasive pests causing significant economic damage in agro-forestry systems. They spend the majority of their life-cycle concealed inside natural wood or wooden packaging materials and are largely protected from adverse environmental conditions and pesticide sprays. Biological control via parasitoid natural enemies including members of the bethylid genus Sclerodermus, has proven effective against some long-horned beetles that are invasive in China. In Europe, the biocontrol potential of native Sclerodermus species is being evaluated with a view to developing efficient mass-rearing techniques and then actively deploying them against invasive Asian beetles. Here, we continue evaluations of S. brevicornis by establishing that groups of females that have already reared offspring to emergence are capable of reproducing subsequent hosts and by evaluating the lifetime reproductive capacity of individual females provided with successive hosts. Additionally, we assess the laboratory shelf-life of adult females stored for different times at different temperatures including cold storage, and then assess the post-storage reproductive performance of groups of females provided with a single host. We found that adult female longevity declines with increasing storage temperature and that most aspects of subsequent performance are negatively affected by high temperatures. The adaptability to low temperature storage enhances the suitability of S. brevicornis to mass-rearing programs and thus biocontrol deployment. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Predicting the Invasion Potential of the Lily Leaf Beetle, Lilioceris lilii Scopoli (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), in North America
Insects 2020, 11(9), 560; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11090560 - 23 Aug 2020
Abstract
Invasive species are among the leading threats to global ecosystems due to impacts on native flora and fauna through competition and predation. The lily leaf beetle, Lilioceris lilii Scopoli (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is an invasive pest of lilies (Lilium spp.) and other genera [...] Read more.
Invasive species are among the leading threats to global ecosystems due to impacts on native flora and fauna through competition and predation. The lily leaf beetle, Lilioceris lilii Scopoli (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is an invasive pest of lilies (Lilium spp.) and other genera of Liliaceae (Liliales). A habitat suitability model was created using Maxent, to help predict if L. lilii will be able to establish in locations were native North American Liliaceae species grow. The model was created using georeferenced occurrence records from the beetle’s native, naturalized, and invasive range. Model results indicate that precipitation in the driest quarter and annual average temperatures are most strongly correlated with L. lilii distribution, and suggest that the species will perform poorly in very dry, hot, or cold environments. The model also indicates that the beetle should be able to establish throughout the range of most North American Liliaceae genera, including species of special conservation concern. This model can be used by natural area managers to identify areas of high habitat suitability that overlap with vulnerable North American Liliaceae species, and prioritize L. lilii monitoring and control activities as the beetle continues to expand its range. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Morphological and Molecular Characterization of Lema bilineata (Germar), a New Alien Invasive Leaf Beetle for Europe, with Notes on the Related Species Lema daturaphila Kogan & Goeden
Insects 2020, 11(5), 295; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11050295 - 11 May 2020
Abstract
Lema bilineata (Germar) is an alien invasive leaf beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) first recorded in Europe in the summer of 2017 in the province of Naples (Campania, Italy). It occurs on both cultivated plants (Nicotiana tabacum) and weeds (Salpichroa origanifolia and [...] Read more.
Lema bilineata (Germar) is an alien invasive leaf beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) first recorded in Europe in the summer of 2017 in the province of Naples (Campania, Italy). It occurs on both cultivated plants (Nicotiana tabacum) and weeds (Salpichroa origanifolia and Datura spp.). Information on morphological characters, color variation and molecular data are deficient for L. bilineata, as is the case for most Lema species. These data could be useful to discriminate between this species and the closely related Lema daturaphila Kogan & Goeden, which has the same potential to become an alien invasive species. In this paper, color variation in adults and the morphology of the aedeagi and spermathecae of the two species are documented and compared, including micrographic images. Additional data on the current distribution of L. bilineata in Campania is also provided. The cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) barcoding region of both Italian and South African specimens of L. bilineata, as well as South African specimens of L. daturaphila, was sequenced. A preliminary phylogenetic tree is provided, based on the sequences available for Lema species. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Aleurocanthus spiniferus (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) in Some European Countries: Diffusion, Hosts, Molecular Characterization, and Natural Enemies
Insects 2020, 11(1), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11010042 - 07 Jan 2020
Cited by 4
Abstract
After the first record in 2008 in Southeast Italy, the alien invasive and quarantine pest Aleurocanthus spiniferus (orange spiny whitefly—OSW) has gradually spread throughout Europe, infesting several new host plants in addition to the known hosts. Molecular characterization of some Italian populations and [...] Read more.
After the first record in 2008 in Southeast Italy, the alien invasive and quarantine pest Aleurocanthus spiniferus (orange spiny whitefly—OSW) has gradually spread throughout Europe, infesting several new host plants in addition to the known hosts. Molecular characterization of some Italian populations and a newly found Albanian population highlighted two different haplotypes invading Europe, belonging to one of the haplogroups previously recorded in China. A predator was recorded for the first time in several fields in Italy in association with OSW and other whitefly species. It was successively identified through a morpho-molecular characterization as a Nearctic member of the tribe Serangiini, the ladybird beetle, Delphastus catalinae. This predator represents a promising biocontrol agent to manage A. spiniferus outbreaks in Italy and other invaded countries. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Biology, Ecology, and Management of Erthesina fullo (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae): A Review
Insects 2020, 11(6), 346; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11060346 - 03 Jun 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
The yellow spotted stink bug (YSSB), Erthesina fullo Thunberg, is one of the most widely distributed phytophagous insect pests in Asia. YSSB is highly polyphagous and in China it feeds on over 57 host plants in 29 families, including some economically important fruit [...] Read more.
The yellow spotted stink bug (YSSB), Erthesina fullo Thunberg, is one of the most widely distributed phytophagous insect pests in Asia. YSSB is highly polyphagous and in China it feeds on over 57 host plants in 29 families, including some economically important fruit crops such as kiwifruit, pear, peach, apple, and pomegranate. With a primarily r-selected life history strategy, reproductive diapause, aggregation behavior, wide host range, high dispersal capacity, and close association with human-modified ecosystems, YSSB is a potentially invasive species that poses significant biosecurity threats to other countries outside its native range. This review summarizes basic and applied knowledge on the biology, ecology, and management of YSSB in China, with specific emphasis on its life history, host range, damage and impacts on economically important horticulture crops, and integrated pest management (IPM) approaches. The insights from the Chinese literature on this pest will help the countries outside its native range to conduct appropriate biosecurity risk assessments, develop a sound surveillance program, and develop an emergency response plan before its invasion of new geographic areas. Full article
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Open AccessReview
New Approaches in Urban Forestry to Minimize Invasive Species Impacts: The Case of Xiongan New Area in China
Insects 2020, 11(5), 300; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11050300 - 12 May 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
China is implementing an extensive urban forestry plan in Xiongan New Area (XNA), a new city in Hebei province. The city has been designated to serve Beijing’s noncapital functions and promote the integration of the broader Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei city-region. As part of a green [...] Read more.
China is implementing an extensive urban forestry plan in Xiongan New Area (XNA), a new city in Hebei province. The city has been designated to serve Beijing’s noncapital functions and promote the integration of the broader Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei city-region. As part of a green initiative to minimize environmental impacts and its carbon footprint, a massive urban forestry system has been planned on an unprecedented scale, expected to cover over 600 km2 by 2030. Using science to inform policy, one major goal is to simultaneously minimize impacts of invasive species, while making urban forests more resilient to potential invasive species threats. In this review, we introduce these urban forestry plans such as basic concepts and principles for afforestation, tree species to be planted, delineation of existing pests already established, and expected forest invasive species of concern threatening the new area. Finally, we introduce a framework for invasive pest management strategies in XNA based on a “big data” approach and decision system to minimize impacts of invasive species. This new approach to urban forestry has the potential to become an exemplary global model for urban forestry planning, one that integrates research activities focused on forest health surveys and monitoring with sustainable forestry management. Finally, we provide an overview of the forest health policy required for the design of an unprecedentedly large new urban forest from initial planning to full implementation of an integrated forest management program. Full article
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