Topical Collection "Integrated Pest Management in Arable and Open Field Horticultural Crops"

A topical collection in Insects (ISSN 2075-4450). This collection belongs to the section "Insect Pest and Vector Management".

Editor

Dr. Andrew G. S. Cuthbertson
Website
Collection Editor
Independent Science Advisor, York, UK
Interests: Arable and Horticultural Crop production, Biological Control, Integrated Pest Management, Invasive species
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

Invertebrate pest control within both agricultural and horticultural production systems continues to present many challenges. Over the past decades the commonly used method for pest control has been the direct application of chemical products. However, in response to environmental, economic, and other problems associated with the over-reliance on chemical insecticides there has been an increasing drive towards the development of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) approaches. Many IPM strategies are now well developed under protected environments. However, within the open field in many situations targeted success is yet to be achieved. This collection will include original research articles and reviews by leading research entomologists and associated experts. Articles will focus on the development and implementation of IPM strategies against various major arable and horticultural invertebrate pests (both indigenous and invasive species). Articles that outline the integration of various control options for a given pest species and also the appropriate use of chemicals within management strategies are particularly welcome.

Dr. Andrew G. S. Cuthbertson
Collection Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Keywords

  • Arable Crops
  • Horticulture
  • Integrated Pest Management
  • Pesticides

Published Papers (7 papers)

2020

Open AccessReview
Integration of Entomopathogenic Fungi into IPM Programs: Studies Involving Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea) Affecting Horticultural Crops
Insects 2020, 11(10), 659; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11100659 - 25 Sep 2020
Abstract
Weevils are significant pests of horticultural crops and are largely managed with insecticides. In response to concerns about negative impacts of synthetic insecticides on humans and the environment, entomopathogenic fungi (EPF) have been developed as an alternative method of control, and as such [...] Read more.
Weevils are significant pests of horticultural crops and are largely managed with insecticides. In response to concerns about negative impacts of synthetic insecticides on humans and the environment, entomopathogenic fungi (EPF) have been developed as an alternative method of control, and as such appear to be “ready-made” components of integrated pest management (IPM) programs. As the success of pest control requires a thorough knowledge of the biology of the pests, this review summarises our current knowledge of weevil biology on nut trees, fruit crops, plant storage roots, and palm trees. In addition, three groups of life cycles are defined based on weevil developmental habitats, and together with information from studies of EPF activity on these groups, we discuss the tactics for integrating EPF into IPM programs. Finally, we highlight the gaps in the research required to optimise the performance of EPF and provide recommendations for the improvement of EPF efficacy for the management of key weevils of horticultural crops. Full article
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Potato Tuberworm Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller) (Lepidoptera: Gelechioidea) Leaf Infestation Effects Performance of Conspecific Larvae on Harvested Tubers by Inducing Chemical Defenses
Insects 2020, 11(9), 633; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11090633 - 15 Sep 2020
Abstract
Conspecific aboveground and belowground herbivores can interact with each other, mediated by plant secondary chemicals; however, little attention has been paid to the interaction between leaf feeders and tuber-feeders. Here, we evaluated the effect of the foliar feeding of P. operculella larvae on [...] Read more.
Conspecific aboveground and belowground herbivores can interact with each other, mediated by plant secondary chemicals; however, little attention has been paid to the interaction between leaf feeders and tuber-feeders. Here, we evaluated the effect of the foliar feeding of P. operculella larvae on the development of conspecific larvae feeding on harvested tubers by determining the nutrition and defense metabolites in the whole plant (leaf, root and tuber). We found that leaf feeding negatively affected tuber larval performance by increasing the female larval developmental time and reducing the male pupal weight. In addition, aboveground herbivory increased α-chaconine and glycoalkaloids in tubers and α-solanine in leaves, but decreased α-chaconine and glycoalkaloids in leaves. Aboveground herbivory also altered the levels of soluble sugar, soluble protein, starch, carbon (C), nitrogen (N), as well as the C:N ratio in both leaves and tubers. Aboveground P. operculella infestations could affect the performance of conspecific larvae feeding on harvested tubers by inducing glycoalkaloids in the host plant. Our findings indicate that field leaf herbivory should be considered when assessing the quality of potato tubers and their responses to pests during storage. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Slug Monitoring and Impacts on the Ground Beetle Community in the Frame of Sustainable Pest Control in Conventional and Conservation Agroecosystems
Insects 2020, 11(6), 380; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11060380 - 18 Jun 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
In conservation agriculture, slugs are considered significant pests and their monitoring is a key option in the integrated pest management framework. Together with molluscicide applications, predators such as ground beetles can offer a tool for slug control in the field. Through the evaluation [...] Read more.
In conservation agriculture, slugs are considered significant pests and their monitoring is a key option in the integrated pest management framework. Together with molluscicide applications, predators such as ground beetles can offer a tool for slug control in the field. Through the evaluation of slug and ground beetle monitoring strategies, this work compared their presence in conventional and conservation agricultural plots. The invasive Deroceras invadens was the dominant slug species to occur in all sampling periods. Among Carabidae, Poecilus cupreus and Pterostichus melas were the most abundant species, and Bembidion spp., Brachinus spp., and Harpalus spp. were also common. Beer-baited pitfall traps, whatever their alcoholic content, caught more slugs and ground beetles than wooden boards used as shelters. Slugs were more abundant in conventional plots than in conservation plots, possibly due to the lower presence of natural enemies such as ground beetles. Despite possible impacts on Carabidae, beer-baited pitfall traps should be considered a useful tool for slug monitoring and for the planning of molluscicide applications. Soil management such as minimum- or no-tillage and the presence of cover crops are important elements influencing both slug and ground beetle presence, possibly playing a key role in the maintenance of natural enemy populations. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Different Combinations of Phosphorus and Nitrogen Fertilization on Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Aphids in Wheat
Insects 2020, 11(6), 365; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11060365 - 11 Jun 2020
Abstract
While chemical fertilizers can be used to increase crop yield, the abuse of fertilizers aggravates environmental pollution and soil degradation. Understanding the effects of chemical fertilizers on the interaction between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and pest insects is of great benefit to crop [...] Read more.
While chemical fertilizers can be used to increase crop yield, the abuse of fertilizers aggravates environmental pollution and soil degradation. Understanding the effects of chemical fertilizers on the interaction between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and pest insects is of great benefit to crop and environmental protection, because AMF can enhance the nutrition absorption and insect resistance of crops. This study tested the effect of different levels of phosphorus, nitrogen, and their interactions on AMF, secondary metabolites, Sitobion avenae in garden, as well as the wheat traits in field. The results showed that AMF colonization on roots in the P0N1 treatment (0 g P/pot, 1.3083 g N/pot in the garden, and 0 g P/plot, 299.84 g N/plot) was the highest in both the garden and the field. The abundance of aphid was reduced in the P0N1 treatment, and there were negative relationships between aphids and AMF and phenolics, but a positive relationship between AMF and phenolics. Our results indicated that a change in the ratio of phosphorus to nitrogen affects the relationship among AMF, aphid abundance, and metabolites. The results also suggested an approach to save chemical fertilizers that could improve crop health and protect the agroecosystem against pollution at the same time. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Susceptibility of Selected Tea Shoots to Oviposition by Empoasca onukii (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) and Feasibility of Egg Removal with Harvesting
Insects 2020, 11(6), 338; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11060338 - 01 Jun 2020
Abstract
The Empoasca onukii (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) female lays its eggs inside the epidermis of the tea plant shoots. This has led to speculation that shoot harvesting could represent a method of egg removal. To verify the validity of this hypothesis, we sought to determine [...] Read more.
The Empoasca onukii (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) female lays its eggs inside the epidermis of the tea plant shoots. This has led to speculation that shoot harvesting could represent a method of egg removal. To verify the validity of this hypothesis, we sought to determine which part of the shoot was used for the oviposition and how the value of the harvested shoot affects the cost of the egg removal. In this study, four tea cultivars were chosen to examine the preferences for the site of oviposition. In addition, a mathematical model was used to describe the correlation between the economic value of the selected shoot and eggs laid within the shoot. Our study revealed that the pest preferred the 3rd and 4th leaf order intervals of the shoot as the oviposition sites, and the oviposition preferences was dependent on the leaf order interval class across all tea cultivars. In addition, a significant negative exponential relationship was found between the economic value of the selected shoot and the percentage of the eggs laid within the shoot, indicating that egg removal through shoot harvesting was limited. The findings of this study could be used to better understand the role of shoot harvesting in egg removal and would provide new insights into the understanding of the incidence of this pest. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Airborne Pheromone Quantification in Treated Vineyards with Different Mating Disruption Dispensers against Lobesia botrana
Insects 2020, 11(5), 289; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11050289 - 09 May 2020
Abstract
Mating disruption (MD) is widely used against the European grapevine moth (EGVM), Lobesia botrana (Denis and Schiffermüller; Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), by installing passive dispensers or aerosol devices. The present work reports a new sampling and quantification methodology to obtain absolute data about field airborne [...] Read more.
Mating disruption (MD) is widely used against the European grapevine moth (EGVM), Lobesia botrana (Denis and Schiffermüller; Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), by installing passive dispensers or aerosol devices. The present work reports a new sampling and quantification methodology to obtain absolute data about field airborne pheromone concentration based on air samplings and sensitive chromatographic-spectroscopic methods. Samplings were performed in fields treated with passive dispensers or aerosol devices at different moments throughout the crop cycle to study how they act and how the disruption is triggered. Moreover, pheromone adsorption and releasing capacity of vine leaves were studied to elucidate their role in the disruption. Although both types of dispensers were effective in limiting the damage inflicted by EGVM, they performed differently and provided different airborne pheromone concentration profiles. Results also proved that leaves were able to adsorb and release part of the airborne pheromone acting as subsequent and additional pheromone sources. This fact could explain the different concentration profiles. Moreover, our results suggest that lower pheromone emission than that of the current passive dispensers still could provide an adequate performance in the field. Competitive mechanisms involved in MD using both dispensers, the dynamics of the airborne pheromone throughout the time and the importance of the canopy are discussed. Full article
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Open AccessEditorial
Special Issue: Integrated Pest Management in Arable and Open Field Horticultural Crops
Insects 2020, 11(2), 82; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11020082 - 23 Jan 2020
Abstract
Invertebrate pest control within both agricultural and horticultural production systems continues to present many challenges. Over the past decades the commonly used method for pest control has been the direct application of chemical products. However, in response to environmental, economic, and other problems [...] Read more.
Invertebrate pest control within both agricultural and horticultural production systems continues to present many challenges. Over the past decades the commonly used method for pest control has been the direct application of chemical products. However, in response to environmental, economic, and other problems associated with the over-reliance on chemical insecticides there has been an increasing drive towards the development of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) approaches. Many IPM strategies are now well developed under protected environments. However, within the open field in many situations targeted success is yet to be achieved. This special issue will seek to showcase original articles and reviews by leading research entomologists and associated experts. Articles presented will focus on the development and implementation of IPM strategies against various major arable and horticultural invertebrate pests (both indigenous and invasive species). Full article
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