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Special Issue "Ribbon Synapses: Molecular Mechanisms of Synaptic Signaling and Involvement in Diseases"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Neurobiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2022 | Viewed by 2428

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Ruth Heidelberger
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Neurobiology & Anatomy, McGovern Medical School, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX 77030, USA
Interests: retinal ribbon synapses; exocytosis and neurotransmitter release mechanisms; synaptic vesicle dynamics; synaptic plasticity; retinal degeneration
Prof. Dr. Frank Schmitz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Neuroanatomy, Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Saarland University, 66421 Homburg, Germany
Interests: retina; ribbon synapses; synaptic ribbon; active zone; synaptic signaling in photoreceptor ribbon synapses
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. David Zenisek
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Cellular & Molecular Physiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
Interests: ribbon synapses; retinal synapses; hair cell; exocytosis; endocytosis; synaptic transmission; vesicles

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue on ribbon synapses welcomes studies on ribbon synapses in the retina, inner ear, and pineal gland. These include papers on the molecular anatomy and physiology of ribbon synapses. Studies on translational aspects/synaptic dysfunctions/diseases in which ribbon synapses play an important role are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Ruth Heidelberger
Prof. Dr. Frank Schmitz
Prof. Dr. David Zenisek
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ribbon synapses
  • molecular anatomy and physiology of ribbon synapses
  • retina, inner ear ribbon synapses
  • pineal gland
  • synaptic ribbon
  • exocytosis
  • endocytosis
  • neuronal networks
  • circadian rhythms and circadian signaling

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Eliminating Synaptic Ribbons from Rods and Cones Halves the Releasable Vesicle Pool and Slows Down Replenishment
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(12), 6429; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23126429 - 08 Jun 2022
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Abstract
Glutamate release from rod and cone photoreceptor cells involves presynaptic ribbons composed largely of the protein RIBEYE. To examine roles of ribbons in rods and cones, we studied mice in which GCamP3 replaced the B-domain of RIBEYE. We discovered that ribbons were absent [...] Read more.
Glutamate release from rod and cone photoreceptor cells involves presynaptic ribbons composed largely of the protein RIBEYE. To examine roles of ribbons in rods and cones, we studied mice in which GCamP3 replaced the B-domain of RIBEYE. We discovered that ribbons were absent from rods and cones of both knock-in mice possessing GCamP3 and conditional RIBEYE knockout mice. The mice lacking ribbons showed reduced temporal resolution and contrast sensitivity assessed with optomotor reflexes. ERG recordings showed 50% reduction in scotopic and photopic b-waves. The readily releasable pool (RRP) of vesicles in rods and cones measured using glutamate transporter anion currents (IA(glu)) was also halved. We also studied the release from cones by stimulating them optogenetically with ChannelRhodopsin2 (ChR2) while recording postsynaptic currents in horizontal cells. Recovery of the release from paired pulse depression was twofold slower in the rods and cones lacking ribbons. The release from rods at −40 mV in darkness involves regularly spaced multivesicular fusion events. While the regular pattern of release remained in the rods lacking ribbons, the number of vesicles comprising each multivesicular event was halved. Our results support conclusions that synaptic ribbons in rods and cones expand the RRP, speed up vesicle replenishment, and augment some forms of multivesicular release. Slower replenishment and a smaller RRP in photoreceptors lacking ribbons may contribute to diminished temporal frequency responses and weaker contrast sensitivity. Full article
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Article
Early Changes in Exo- and Endocytosis in the EAE Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis Correlate with Decreased Synaptic Ribbon Size and Reduced Ribbon-Associated Vesicle Pools in Rod Photoreceptor Synapses
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(19), 10789; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms221910789 - 06 Oct 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1134
Abstract
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that finally leads to demyelination. Demyelinating optic neuritis is a frequent symptom in MS. Recent studies also revealed synapse dysfunctions in MS patients and MS mouse models. We previously reported alterations [...] Read more.
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that finally leads to demyelination. Demyelinating optic neuritis is a frequent symptom in MS. Recent studies also revealed synapse dysfunctions in MS patients and MS mouse models. We previously reported alterations of photoreceptor ribbon synapses in the experimental auto-immune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model of MS. In the present study, we found that the previously observed decreased imunosignals of photoreceptor ribbons in early EAE resulted from a decrease in synaptic ribbon size, whereas the number/density of ribbons in photoreceptor synapses remained unchanged. Smaller photoreceptor ribbons are associated with fewer docked and ribbon-associated vesicles. At a functional level, depolarization-evoked exocytosis as monitored by optical recording was diminished even as early as on day 7 after EAE induction. Moreover compensatory, post-depolarization endocytosis was decreased. Decreased post-depolarization endocytosis in early EAE correlated with diminished synaptic enrichment of dynamin3. In contrast, basal endocytosis in photoreceptor synapses of resting non-depolarized retinal slices was increased in early EAE. Increased basal endocytosis correlated with increased de-phosphorylation of dynamin1. Thus, multiple endocytic pathways in photoreceptor synapse are differentially affected in early EAE and likely contribute to the observed synapse pathology in early EAE. Full article
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