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Special Issue "Myc Function and Regulation"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 September 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Paola Bellosta
Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Cellular, Computational and Integrative Biology, Laboratory of Metabolism of Cell Growth and Neuronal Survival, University of Trento, Trento, Italy;
2. Department of Medicine&Endocrinology, NYU Langone Medical Center, Smilow Research Building, 550 First Ave, 10016 NY, USA
Interests: Myc; growth; ribosomal biogenesis; autophagy; Insulin/TOR signaling; lipid metabolism; neuronal degeneration; Huntington’s disease
Dr. Yari Ciribilli
Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Cellular, Computational and Integrative Biology - CIBIO University of Trento, Via Sommarive, 9I - 38123 Povo (Trento), Italy
Interests: transcription regulation; chemoresistance; cancer stem cells; epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition; breast cancer

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Although more than 25 years have passed since the discovery of Myc, and over 34,000 publications have been written, what do we know about the function of this fundamental gene? This Special Issue will try to provide an overview of the work of many scientists who have helped to understand the physiological function of Myc, from its role in the control of animal development and organ growth, to its ability to rewire and control cellular metabolic pathways to drive the growth of tumors.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Paola Bellosta
Dr. Yari Ciribilli
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • organ growth
  • cell competition
  • development/evolution
  • ribosome biogenesis
  • stem cell/regeneration
  • chromatin modification
  • epigenetics
  • cancer metabolism
  • leukemia and others tumors

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
High MYC mRNA Expression Is More Clinically Relevant than MYC DNA Amplification in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(1), 217; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21010217 - 28 Dec 2019
Cited by 6
Abstract
DNA abnormalities are used in inclusion criteria of clinical trials for treatments with specific targeted molecules. MYC is one of the most powerful oncogenes and is known to be associated with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Its DNA amplification is often part of the [...] Read more.
DNA abnormalities are used in inclusion criteria of clinical trials for treatments with specific targeted molecules. MYC is one of the most powerful oncogenes and is known to be associated with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Its DNA amplification is often part of the targeted DNA-sequencing panels under the assumption of reflecting upregulated signaling. However, it remains unclear if MYC DNA amplification is a surrogate of its upregulated signaling. Thus, we investigated the difference between MYC DNA amplification and mRNA high expression in TNBCs utilizing publicly available cohorts. MYC DNA amplified tumors were found to have various mRNA expression levels, suggesting that MYC DNA amplification does not always result in elevated MYC mRNA expression. Compared to other subtypes, both MYC DNA amplification and mRNA high expression were more frequent in the TNBCs. MYC mRNA high expression, but not DNA amplification, was significantly associated with worse overall survival in the TNBCs. The TNBCs with MYC mRNA high expression enriched MYC target genes, cell cycle related genes, and WNT/β-catenin gene sets, whereas none of them were enriched in MYC DNA amplified TNBCs. In conclusion, MYC mRNA high expression, but not DNA amplification, reflects not only its upregulated signaling pathway, but also clinical significance in TNBCs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Myc Function and Regulation)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Myc as a Regulator of Ribosome Biogenesis and Cell Competition: A Link to Cancer
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(11), 4037; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21114037 - 05 Jun 2020
Abstract
The biogenesis of ribosomes is a finely regulated multistep process linked to cell proliferation and growth—processes which require a high rate of protein synthesis. One of the master regulators of ribosome biogenesis is Myc, a well-known proto-oncogene that has an important role in [...] Read more.
The biogenesis of ribosomes is a finely regulated multistep process linked to cell proliferation and growth—processes which require a high rate of protein synthesis. One of the master regulators of ribosome biogenesis is Myc, a well-known proto-oncogene that has an important role in ribosomal function and in the regulation of protein synthesis. The relationship between Myc and the ribosomes was first highlighted in Drosophila, where Myc’s role in controlling Pol-I, II and III was evidenced by both microarrays data, and by the ability of Myc to control growth (mass), and cellular and animal size. Moreover, Myc can induce cell competition, a physiological mechanism through which cells with greater fitness grow better and thereby prevail over less competitive cells, which are actively eliminated by apoptosis. Myc-induced cell competition was shown to regulate both vertebrate development and tumor promotion; however, how these functions are linked to Myc’s control of ribosome biogenesis, protein synthesis and growth is not clear yet. In this review, we will discuss the major pathways that link Myc to ribosomal biogenesis, also in light of its function in cell competition, and how these mechanisms may reflect its role in favoring tumor promotion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Myc Function and Regulation)
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Open AccessReview
The Complex Network between MYC Oncogene and microRNAs in Gastric Cancer: An Overview
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(5), 1782; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21051782 - 05 Mar 2020
Abstract
Despite the advancements in cancer treatments, gastric cancer is still one of the leading causes of death worldwide. In this context, it is of great interest to discover new and more effective ways of treating this disease. Accumulated evidences have demonstrated the amplification [...] Read more.
Despite the advancements in cancer treatments, gastric cancer is still one of the leading causes of death worldwide. In this context, it is of great interest to discover new and more effective ways of treating this disease. Accumulated evidences have demonstrated the amplification of 8q24.21 region in gastric tumors. Furthermore, this is the region where the widely known MYC oncogene and different microRNAs are located. MYC deregulation is key in tumorigenesis in various types of tissues, once it is associated with cell proliferation, survival, and drug resistance. microRNAs are a class of noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate the protein translation, and which deregulation is related with gastric cancer development. However, little is understood about the interactions between microRNAs and MYC. Here, we overview the MYC role and its relationship with the microRNAs network in gastric cancer aiming to identify potential targets useful to be used in clinic, not only as biomarkers, but also as molecules for development of promising therapies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Myc Function and Regulation)
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Open AccessReview
Emerging Roles of C-Myc in Cancer Stem Cell-Related Signaling and Resistance to Cancer Chemotherapy: A Potential Therapeutic Target Against Colorectal Cancer
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(9), 2340; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20092340 - 11 May 2019
Cited by 18
Abstract
Myc is a nuclear transcription factor that mainly regulates cell growth, cell cycle, metabolism, and survival. Myc family proteins contain c-Myc, n-Myc, and l-Myc. Among them, c-Myc can become a promising therapeutic target molecule in cancer. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are known to [...] Read more.
Myc is a nuclear transcription factor that mainly regulates cell growth, cell cycle, metabolism, and survival. Myc family proteins contain c-Myc, n-Myc, and l-Myc. Among them, c-Myc can become a promising therapeutic target molecule in cancer. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are known to be responsible for the therapeutic resistance. In the previous study, we demonstrated that c-Myc mediates drug resistance of colorectal CSCs using a patient-derived primary three-dimensional (3D) organoid culture. In this review, we mainly focus on the roles of c-Myc-related signaling in the regulation of CSCs, chemotherapy resistance, and colorectal cancer organoids. Finally, we introduce the various types of c-Myc inhibitors and propose the possibility of c-Myc as a therapeutic target against colorectal cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Myc Function and Regulation)
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