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Special Issue "Dental Pulp Stem Cells: Unveiling Their Multifaceted Therapeutic Potential"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Pathology, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Carnevale Gianluca
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Surgery, Medicine, Dentistry and Morphological Sciences with interest in Transplant, Oncology and Regenerative Medicine, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 41125 Modena, Italy
Interests: dental pulp stem cells; mesenchymal cells; regenerative medicine
Dr. Alessandra Pisciotta
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Surgery, Medicine, Dentistry and Morphological Sciences with interest in Transplant, Oncology and Regenerative Medicine, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 41125 Modena, Italy
Interests: dental pulp stem cells; regenerative potential; human stem cells isolated from amniotic fluid

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dental pulp is a loose connective tissue entrapped within the pulp chamber of the teeth and is a reservoir of adult stem cells characterized by self-renewal, a high proliferation rate, and a wide differentiation potential, features to be attributed to the peculiar embryological origin from the neural crest, which is so far considered the fourth germ layer. Since the discovery in the early 2000s, the differentiation potential of these stem cells has been extensively investigated, demonstrating their plasticity of application to several animal models of tissue injury, including bone, nerve, muscle, and cartilage defects, often in association with the use of different types of biomaterials/scaffolds. A further notable feature of these stem cells is represented by their immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory capabilities, which are currently under investigation and might provide insights into their potential application to allogeneic transplants under immunosuppression-free regimens as well as to the treatment of immune and inflammatory-related diseases. In this Special Issue, we invite researchers to contribute original research articles as well as review articles, to elucidate novel insights regarding the potential of dental pulp stem cells for multiple therapeutic applications. These include but are not limited to the fields mentioned in the keywords.

Dr. Carnevale Gianluca
Dr. Alessandra Pisciotta
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Molecular mechanisms of immunosuppression/immunomodulation
  • Secretome role in tumor growth/progression
  • miRNA signature
  • Modulation of angiogenesis
  • Dynamic culture systems for large-scale expansion
  • Organ on a chip and microfluidics
  • Bioactive molecules and growth factors effects
  • Interactions with different biomaterials for soft and hard tissue regeneration
  • Stem cell potential for neurodegenerative diseases

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Comparing the Osteogenic Potentials and Bone Regeneration Capacities of Bone Marrow and Dental Pulp Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Rabbit Calvarial Bone Defect Model
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(20), 5015; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20205015 - 10 Oct 2019
Abstract
The bone regeneration efficiency of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and dental pulp mesenchymal stem cells (DPSCs) combined with xenografts in the craniofacial region remains unclear. Accordingly, this study commenced by comparing the cell morphology, cell proliferation, trilineage differentiation, mineral synthesis, and [...] Read more.
The bone regeneration efficiency of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and dental pulp mesenchymal stem cells (DPSCs) combined with xenografts in the craniofacial region remains unclear. Accordingly, this study commenced by comparing the cell morphology, cell proliferation, trilineage differentiation, mineral synthesis, and osteogenic gene expression of BMSCs and DPSCs in vitro. Four experimental groups (empty control, Bio-Oss only, Bio-Oss+BMSCs, and Bio-Oss+DPSCs) were then designed and implanted in rabbit calvarial defects. The BMSCs and DPSCs showed a similar morphology, proliferative ability, surface marker profile, and trilineage-differentiation potential in vitro. However, the BMSCs exhibited a higher mineral deposition and expression levels of osteogenic marker genes, including alkaline phosphatase (ALP), runt related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), and osteocalcin (OCN). In the in vivo studies, the bone volume density in both MSC groups was significantly greater than that in the empty control or Bio-Oss only group. Moreover, the new bone formation and Collagen I / osteoprotegerin protein expressions of the scaffold+MSC groups were higher than those of the Bio-Oss only group. Finally, the Bio-Oss+BMSC and Bio-Oss+DPSC groups had a similar bone mineral density, new bone formation, and osteogenesis-related protein expression. Overall, the DPSCs seeded on Bio-Oss matched the bone regeneration efficacy of BMSCs in vivo and hence appear to be a promising strategy for craniofacial defect repair in future clinical applications. Full article
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