ijms-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Advanced Applications of Carbon-Based Adsorbents"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 January 2023 | Viewed by 3963

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Carlo Crescenzi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of pharmacy, University of Salerno, 84084 Salerno, Italy
Interests: supramolecular chemistry; molecular recognition; separation science; graphitic sorbents
Dr. Paolo Ciccioli
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Institute of Biological Systems, Italian National Research Council, 00015 Rome, Italy
Interests: physical chemistry of graphitic carbons; enrichment and separation methods for organic pollutants in air; removal of organic contaminants from indoor environments and industrial processes
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Sara Bogialli
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Padua, Padova, Italy
Interests: optimization of sample preparation methods for organic contaminants; liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry; high-resolution mass spectrometry; target and non-target analysis; emerging contaminants in environment
Prof. Dr. Maria Sarno
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Physics and Centre NANO_MATES (Research Centre for Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology at the University of Salerno) University of Salerno, 84084 Salerno, Italy
Interests: electron microscopy; nanotechnology; catalysis; electrochemistry; sustainability; circular economy; nanomaterials and carbon materials; energy; environment; nanoelectronics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Carbon-based adsorbents are a broad class of materials including graphitic and amorphous carbons, and are widely used in different fields such as filtration, electrochemistry, purification and catalysis. However, the complexity of their structure and the variety of interactions occurring during the adsorption process generates a number of unexpected noteworthy chemical-physical phenomena. The deep understanding of these phenomena often results in remarkable unique applications. The aim of this Special Issue is to provide a detailed description of the performances, characteristics, and unclear aspects of the most promising families of carbon-based materials. 

The papers for this Special Issue should be focused mainly, although not exclusively, on advanced practical applications of carbon-based adsorbents such as graphitic carbons, graphene, carbon nanotubes, activated carbon fibers, and fullerene-based materials, excluding those obtained with active charcoals, on which a large body of literature is already available. Papers discussing the physical-chemical characterization of carbon-based adsorbents using spectroscopic techniques are also welcome, especially when dealing with those molecular-level interactions affecting performance. Papers dealing with modifications of carbon-based adsorbents (including electrochemical modulation) will also be included, as far as evidence is provided of advantages that their use has in terms of ease of use and economic reward. Emphasis should be given to investigations on those aspects, such as adsorption (either in gas or liquid phases), catalysis, and functionalization processes of carbon-based materials, that can lead to original and challenging applications in various scientific fields, such as advanced materials technologies and environmental, separation, and biological sciences, including more recent applications in space technologies and preventing the spread of coronavirus.

Prof. Dr. Carlo Crescenzi
Dr. Paolo Ciccioli
Prof. Dr. Sara Bogialli
Prof. Dr. Maria Sarno
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Carbon-based adsorbents
  • Graphitic carbon materials
  • Adsorption and catalysis mechanism
  • Solid-phase extraction
  • Separation techniques
  • Spectroscopic characterization

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns as Boosting Surface for the Analysis of Low-Molecular-Weight Compounds by SALDI-MS
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(9), 5027; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23095027 - 30 Apr 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 538
Abstract
Limits of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) in the study of small molecules are due to matrix-related interfering species in the low m/z range. Single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNH) were here evaluated as a specific surface for the rapid analysis of [...] Read more.
Limits of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) in the study of small molecules are due to matrix-related interfering species in the low m/z range. Single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNH) were here evaluated as a specific surface for the rapid analysis of amino acids and lipids by Surface-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization (SALDI). The method was optimized for detecting twenty amino acids, mainly present as cationized species, with the [M+K]+ response generally 2-time larger than the [M+Na]+ one. The [M+Na]+/[M+K]+ signals ratio was tentatively correlated with the molecular weight, dipole moment and binding affinity, to describe the amino acids’ coordination ability. The SWCNH-based surface was also tested for analyzing triglycerides in olive oil samples, showing promising results in determining the percentage composition of fatty acids without any sample treatment. Results indicated that SWCNH is a promising substrate for the SALDI-MS analysis of low molecular weight compounds with different polarities, enlarging the analytical platforms for MALDI applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Applications of Carbon-Based Adsorbents)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Adsorption of 1,2-Dichlorobenzene from the Aqueous Phase onto Activated Carbons and Modified Carbon Nanotubes
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(23), 13152; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms222313152 - 05 Dec 2021
Viewed by 726
Abstract
This study aimed to describe the adsorption process of ortho-dichlorobenzene (o-DCB) onto activated carbons (ACs) and modified carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from the aqueous phase. The starting material NC_7000 carbon nanotubes were modified by chlorination (NC_C) and then by the introduction of hydroxyl groups [...] Read more.
This study aimed to describe the adsorption process of ortho-dichlorobenzene (o-DCB) onto activated carbons (ACs) and modified carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from the aqueous phase. The starting material NC_7000 carbon nanotubes were modified by chlorination (NC_C) and then by the introduction of hydroxyl groups (NC_C_B). The concentration of o-DCB in solutions was performed by UV-VIS spectrophotometry. After adsorption, the activated carbons were regenerated by extraction with organic solvents such as acetone, methanol, ethanol, and 1-propanol; the carbon nanotubes were regenerated by methanol. The degree of adsorbate recovery was determined by gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization detection, using ethylbenzene as an internal standard. The equilibrium isotherm data of adsorption were satisfactorily fitted by the Langmuir equations. The results indicate that carbon adsorbents are effective porous materials for removing o-DCB from the aqueous phase. Additionally, activated carbons are more regenerative adsorbents than carbon nanotubes. The recoveries of o-DCB from ACs were in the range of 76–85%, whereas the recoveries from CNTs were in the range of 23–46%. Modifications of CNTs affect the improvement of their adsorption properties towards o-DCB compared to unmodified CNTs. However, the introduction of new functional groups on carbon nanotube surfaces makes the regeneration process less effective. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Applications of Carbon-Based Adsorbents)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Hydrothermal-Freeze-Casting of Poly(amidoamine)-Modified Graphene Aerogels towards CO2 Adsorption
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(17), 9333; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22179333 - 28 Aug 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 719
Abstract
This article presents novel poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer-modified with partially-reduced graphene oxide (rGO) aerogels, obtained using the combined solvothermal synthesis-freeze-casting approach. The properties of modified aerogels are investigated with varying synthesis conditions, such as dendrimer generation (G), GO:PAMAM wt. ratio, solvothermal temperature, and freeze-casting [...] Read more.
This article presents novel poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer-modified with partially-reduced graphene oxide (rGO) aerogels, obtained using the combined solvothermal synthesis-freeze-casting approach. The properties of modified aerogels are investigated with varying synthesis conditions, such as dendrimer generation (G), GO:PAMAM wt. ratio, solvothermal temperature, and freeze-casting rate. Scanning electron microscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are employed to characterize the aerogels. The results indicate a strong correlation of the synthesis conditions with N content, N/C ratio, and nitrogen contributions in the modified aerogels. Our results show that the best CO2 adsorption performance was exhibited by the aerogels modified with higher generation (G7) dendrimer at low GO:PAMAM ratio as 2:0.1 mg mL−1 and obtained at higher solvothermal temperature and freeze-casting in liquid nitrogen. The enclosed results are indicative of a viable approach to modify graphene aerogels towards improving the CO2 capture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Applications of Carbon-Based Adsorbents)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Graphene Oxide Loaded with Protocatechuic Acid and Chlorogenic Acid Dual Drug Nanodelivery System for Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Therapeutic Application
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(11), 5786; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22115786 - 28 May 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1033
Abstract
Hepatocellular carcinoma or hepatoma is a primary malignant neoplasm that responsible for 75–90% of all liver cancer in humans. Nanotechnology introduced the dual drug nanodelivery method as one of the initiatives in nanomedicine for cancer therapy. Graphene oxide (GO) loaded with protocatechuic acid [...] Read more.
Hepatocellular carcinoma or hepatoma is a primary malignant neoplasm that responsible for 75–90% of all liver cancer in humans. Nanotechnology introduced the dual drug nanodelivery method as one of the initiatives in nanomedicine for cancer therapy. Graphene oxide (GO) loaded with protocatechuic acid (PCA) and chlorogenic acid (CA) have shown some anticancer activities in both passive and active targeting. The physicochemical characterizations for nanocomposites were conducted. Cell cytotoxicity assay and lactate dehydrogenase were conducted to estimate cell cytotoxicity and the severity of cell damage. Next, nanocomposite intracellular drug uptake was analyzed using a transmission electron microscope. The accumulation and localization of fluorescent-labelled nanocomposite in the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells were analyzed using a fluorescent microscope. Subsequently, Annexin V- fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)/propidium iodide analysis showed that nanocomposites induced late apoptosis in HepG2 cells. Cell cycle arrest was ascertained at the G2/M phase. There was the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and an upregulation of reactive oxygen species when HepG2 cells were induced by nanocomposites. In conclusion, HepG2 cells treated with a graphene oxide–polyethylene glycol (GOP)–PCA/CA–FA dual drug nanocomposite exhibited significant anticancer activities with less toxicity compared to pristine protocatechuic acid, chlorogenic acid and GOP–PCA/CA nanocomposite, may be due to the utilization of a folic acid-targeting nanodrug delivery system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Applications of Carbon-Based Adsorbents)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Tentative title: “ Surface chemistry of polymer-based nanoporous carbons and their application to the adsorption of amines

Abstract: Due to their pore structure, activated carbons have been traditionally used for media purification in a wide variety of applications. Pharmaceutical impurities can contain in some cases dangling amine groups. However, activated charcoals commonly used in downstream purifications have a basic surface pH. A polymer-based carbon containing an acidic and hydrophilic surface could be more effective for the separation of amine impurities. The objective of this report was to characterize and evaluate the ability of an acidic polymer-based nanoporous carbon in the 30-70 µm particle size range to remove model amines by measuring the static kinetic and equilibrium adsorption capacity and by comparing the acidic polymer-carbon to a commercial charcoal.

Tentative title: “ A preliminary evaluation of single-walled carbon nanohorns as boosting surface for the analysis of low-molecular weight compounds by SALDI-MS

Abstract: Limits of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry in the study of low molecular weight analytes are mainly related to the presence of ionic species in the low m/z region generated by the ionization and reactions of the matrix. For these reasons, in recent years many efforts were done to achieve the production of analyte signals without the presence/assistance of matrices, and avoiding/reducing the severe decomposition reactions typical of LDI conditions. Interesting results have been obtained by the deposition of the analyte on specific surfaces, paving the way for different applications based on Surface-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization (SALDI).

In the present study, single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNH) were tested as boosting surface to develop and optimize a novel SALDI-based method for the rapid analysis of different classes of compounds with molecular weight up to 1000 Da, e.g.. amino acids and lipids.

SWCNH were tested in LDI condition in order to describe the chemical entities possibly interfering at low m/z values. LDI spectra showed a series of highly abundant signals in the range 700-4500 m/z, owing to the molecular weight distribution and to decomposition processes of SWCHNs. Interfering species were negligible at laser power lower than 50%.

Several amino acids, with different molecular weight and polarity, were tested as analytes after proper deposition of the sample on the developed SWCNH-surface. In the acquired spectra, amino acids were detectable as cationized species with K+ and Na+, while the protonated species [M+H]+ were generally not present.

SWCNH-based surface was also tested for the analysis of triglycerides in real olive oil samples to determine the percentage composition of fatty acids without any sample treatment.

The obtained results indicate that SWCNH is a promising substrate for the analysis of low molecular weight compounds with different polarities by SALDI mass spectrometry-based approaches.

Tentative title:  Lignocellulose Biomass as Bisosorbent for Waste Water Treatment and Removal of Agricultural Drugs: A Status Quo on Mechanistical Details

 

Back to TopTop