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Special Issue "Molecular Mechanisms of Human Oogenesis and Early Embryogenesis"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Endocrinology and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2022 | Viewed by 4522

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Jan Tesarik
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
MARGen Clinic, Molecular Assisted Reproducion and Genetics, 18006 Granada, Spain
Interests: molecular mechanisms of spermatogenesis; molecular mechanisms of oogenesis; molecular mechanisms of fertilization; molecular mechanisms of early embryogenesis; molecular markers of male infertility; molecular markers of female infertility; molecular mechanisms of miscarriage; molecular control of reproductive function; translational molecular medicine in infertility management
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue treats with the relationships between molecular events taking place during human oogenesis and the molecular control of the early events during human preimplantation development. The main interest is focused on the human species, with possible applications in the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutical approaches to human infertility management.

Given the fact that the early embryogenesis in species with the late embryonic gene activtion are largely dependent on molecules transmitted by the oocyte, this issue intends to cover, mainly but not exclusively, the repertoire of molecules stored during oogenesis in the oocytes, and their respective roles in the regulation of the early postfertilization events in embryonic development. The principal questions are how these molecules are involved in epigenetic events in early human embryos, to what extent they can repair both sperm and oocyte genetic damage, their relationship with the patient’s age and hormonal status, and the possible ways of therapeutic actions in cases of abnormalities.

The rationale of this special issue is that a thorough knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in the above events should be used as a guide for specific diagnostic and therapeutic procedures used in cases of human infertility.

Dr. Jan Tesarik
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • oogenesis
  • early embryogenesis
  • oocyte activation
  • markers of oocyte and embryo quality
  • suitable animal models
  • human infertility diagnosis and treatment

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Toward Molecular Medicine in Female Infertility Management: Editorial to the Special Issue “Molecular Mechanisms of Human Oogenesis and Early Embryogenesis”
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(24), 13517; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms222413517 - 16 Dec 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 735
Abstract
Female infertility is the main reason for involuntary childlessness nowadays [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Mechanisms of Human Oogenesis and Early Embryogenesis)

Review

Jump to: Editorial

Review
Control of Maternal-to-Zygotic Transition in Human Embryos and Other Animal Species (Especially Mouse): Similarities and Differences
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(15), 8562; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23158562 - 02 Aug 2022
Viewed by 276
Abstract
Maternal-to-zygotic transition (MZT) of the control of early post-fertilization development is a key-event conditioning the fate of the future embryo, fetus and newborn. Because of the relative paucity of data concerning human embryos, due to ethical concerns and the poor availability of human [...] Read more.
Maternal-to-zygotic transition (MZT) of the control of early post-fertilization development is a key-event conditioning the fate of the future embryo, fetus and newborn. Because of the relative paucity of data concerning human embryos, due to ethical concerns and the poor availability of human embryos donated for research, most data have to be derived from animal models, among which those obtained using mouse embryos are most prevalent. However, data obtained by studies performed in non-mammalian specie can also provide useful information. For this reason, this review focuses on similarities and differences of MZT control mechanisms in humans and other species, with particular attention to the mouse. A number of molecular pathways controlling MZT in mice and humans are compared, pointing out those that could be at the origin of further focused experimental studies and the development of new diagnostic tools based on the translational medicine principles. Data concerning possible candidate molecules to be included in these studies are identified. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Mechanisms of Human Oogenesis and Early Embryogenesis)
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Review
Human Chorionic Gonadotropin and Early Embryogenesis: Review
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(3), 1380; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23031380 - 26 Jan 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1789
Abstract
Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) has four major isoforms: classical hCG, hyperglycosylated hCG, free β subunit, and sulphated hCG. Classical hCG is the first molecule synthesized by the embryo. Its RNA is transcribed as early as the eight-cell stage and the blastocyst produces the [...] Read more.
Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) has four major isoforms: classical hCG, hyperglycosylated hCG, free β subunit, and sulphated hCG. Classical hCG is the first molecule synthesized by the embryo. Its RNA is transcribed as early as the eight-cell stage and the blastocyst produces the protein before its implantation. This review synthetizes everything currently known on this multi-effect hormone: hCG levels, angiogenetic activity, immunological actions, and effects on miscarriages and thyroid function. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Mechanisms of Human Oogenesis and Early Embryogenesis)
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Review
Cellular and Molecular Nature of Fragmentation of Human Embryos
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(3), 1349; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23031349 - 25 Jan 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 868
Abstract
Embryo fragmentation represents a phenomenon generally characterized by the presence of membrane-bound extracellular cytoplasm into the perivitelline space. Recent evidence supports the cellular and molecular heterogeneity of embryo fragments. In this narrative review, we described the different embryo fragment-like cellular structures in their [...] Read more.
Embryo fragmentation represents a phenomenon generally characterized by the presence of membrane-bound extracellular cytoplasm into the perivitelline space. Recent evidence supports the cellular and molecular heterogeneity of embryo fragments. In this narrative review, we described the different embryo fragment-like cellular structures in their morphology, molecular content, and supposed function and have reported the proposed theories on their origin over the years. We identified articles related to characterization of embryo fragmentation with a specific literature search string. The occurrence of embryo fragmentation has been related to various mechanisms, of which the most studied are apoptotic cell death, membrane compartmentalization of altered DNA, cytoskeletal disorders, and vesicle formation. These phenomena are thought to result in the extrusion of entire blastomeres, release of apoptotic bodies and other vesicles, and micronuclei formation. Different patterns of fragmentation may have different etiologies and effects on embryo competence. Removal of fragments from the embryo before embryo transfer with the aim to improve implantation potential should be reconsidered on the basis of the present observations Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Mechanisms of Human Oogenesis and Early Embryogenesis)
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