ijms-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Low-Grade Inflammation in Multifactorial Diseases

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Pathology, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2022) | Viewed by 5743

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Translational Medical Science, Section of Paediatrics, University Federico II, Via S. Pansini 5, 80131 Naples, Italy
Interests: pediatrics; gastroenterology; chronic inflammation; celiac disease
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Translational Medical Science, University of Naples, Federico II, 80131 Naples, Italy
Interests: pediatrics; gastroenterology; chronic inflammation; celiac disease
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Translational Medical Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, 80131 Naples, Italy
Interests: adipose tissue; growth factors; inflammation; insulin resistance; tumor–microenvironment interaction; tissue regeneration
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Chronic inflammatory diseases are increasing and quickly becoming a serious social and medical issue. Chronic inflammatory diseases (obesity, diabetes, inflammatory bowel diseases, autoimmune diseases, cancer and several age-related diseases) are generated by the interation of several different factors, such as environmental, genetic and microbiota factors. Among the environmental factors that induce inflammation, nutrients play a key role as they can have pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory effects, directly or indirectly mediated by the intestinal microbiota.

Articles or reviews in this Special Issue will mainly focus on:

1) Obesity, diabetes, inflammatory bowel diseases, autoimmune diseases, cancer, several age-related diseases and other diseases where low-grade inflammation could play a pivotal role in the onset and/or the progression of disease.

2) What happens before the onset of disease in the biochemical, metabolic and pathological processes at the molecular level. We invite manuscripts that describe both the environmental factors or the constitutive, genetic factors that can generate and/or sustain the inflammation.

3) All steps of life from the development to ageing where low-grade inflammation can discriminate between health and disease.

4) How several different factors including diet, nutraceutical and the exclusion of environmental pollutants can interfere with low-grade inflammation and determine the onset or the progression of disease.

Prof. Dr. Maria Vittoria Barone
Prof. Dr. Salvatore Auricchio
Prof. Dr. Pietro Formisano
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

16 pages, 2796 KiB  
Article
Crosstalk between Adipose Tissue and Hepatic Mitochondria in the Development of the Inflammation and Liver Injury during Ageing in High-Fat Diet Fed Rats
by Gina Cavaliere, Angela Catapano, Giovanna Trinchese, Fabiano Cimmino, Ciro Menale, Lidia Petrella and Maria Pina Mollica
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(3), 2967; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms24032967 - 3 Feb 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2235
Abstract
Obesity is considered an epidemic disorder, due to an imbalance between energy consumption and metabolizable energy intake. This balance is increasingly disrupted during normal aging processes due to the progressive impairment of mechanisms that normally control energy homeostasis. Obesity is triggered by an [...] Read more.
Obesity is considered an epidemic disorder, due to an imbalance between energy consumption and metabolizable energy intake. This balance is increasingly disrupted during normal aging processes due to the progressive impairment of mechanisms that normally control energy homeostasis. Obesity is triggered by an excessive lipid depots but reflects systemic inflammation along with large adipocytes secreting proinflammatory adipokines, an increase of the free fatty acids levels in the bloodstream, and ectopic lipid accumulation. Hepatic fat accumulation is the most common cause of chronic liver disease, characterized by mitochondrial dysfunction with a consequent impaired fat metabolism and increased oxidative stress. Therefore, mitochondrial dysfunction is associated to hepatic lipid accumulation and related complications. In this study, we assessed the crosstalk between adipose tissue and liver, analyzing the time-course of changes in hepatic mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation capacity versus fatty acid storage, focusing on the contribution of adipose tissue inflammation to hepatic lipid accumulation, using a rodent model of high fat diet-induced obesity. Our results demonstrate that both high-fat diet-induced obesity and aging induce dysregulation of adipose tissue function and similar metabolic alterations mediated by mitochondrial function impairment and altered inflammatory profile. The high fat diet-induced obesity anticipates and exacerbates liver mitochondrial dysfunction that occurs with aging processes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Low-Grade Inflammation in Multifactorial Diseases)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

13 pages, 2157 KiB  
Review
Etiology of IBD—Is It Still a Mystery?
by Anna Kofla-Dłubacz, Tomasz Pytrus, Katarzyna Akutko, Patrycja Sputa-Grzegrzółka, Aleksandra Piotrowska and Piotr Dzięgiel
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(20), 12445; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms232012445 - 18 Oct 2022
Cited by 32 | Viewed by 2881
Abstract
Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including colitis ulcerosa and Crohn’s disease, are chronic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract for which the cause has not been fully understood. However, it is known that the etiology is multifactorial. The multidirectional network of interactions of environmental, microbiological [...] Read more.
Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including colitis ulcerosa and Crohn’s disease, are chronic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract for which the cause has not been fully understood. However, it is known that the etiology is multifactorial. The multidirectional network of interactions of environmental, microbiological and genetic factors in predisposed persons lead to an excessive and insufficiently inhibited reaction of the immune system, leading to the development of chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal walls, the consequence of which is the loss of the function that the intestine performs, inter alia, through the process of fibrosis. Detailed knowledge of the pathways leading to chronic inflammation makes it possible to pharmacologically modulate disorders and effectively treatthese diseases. In this review, we described the primary and adaptive immune system response in the gut and the known immune pathogenetic pathways leading to the development of IBD. We also described the process leading to intestinal tissue fibrosis, which is an irreversible consequence of untreated IBD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Low-Grade Inflammation in Multifactorial Diseases)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop