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Special Issue "Community Nutrition, Physical Activity and Health Promotion: Current Perspectives in Public Health Nutrition"

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Carmen Pérez-Rodrigo

Faculty of Medicine, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Bo Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: community nutrition; nutrition education; food habits; diet; lifestyle related behavior; diet intake; obesity; chronic disease prevention; community-based interventions
Guest Editor
Dr. Javier Aranceta-Bartrina

Department of Food Sciences and Physiology, University of Navarra, Irunlarrea 1. 31008 Pamplona, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: community nutrition; obesity; nutrition surveys; food habits

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Currently, most societies face the challenge of the growing burden of chronic diseases in aging populations. Moreover, several regions bear the dual burden of over and malnutrition. In this context, nutrition and physical activity are central to all strategies and policies for prevention and support for the management of these problems, both at the individual and community level; considering multiple approaches, scopes and levels of action; involving the main actors, key sectors and stakeholders; looking for participation strategies at the local and community level.

We often live in plural, multicultural societies, in which many people migrate to other places moved by armed conflicts, persecution, disasters and catastrophes, socio-economic or occupational purposes or for any other reason. The reality is that these people undergo food transitions that can pose added risks.

This Special Issue focuses on research on community interventions related to food habits, dietary intake and physical activity. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, evaluation of effectiveness of community-based interventions (any setting), research on environmental determinants (food availability, access to food and beverages, physical environment, sociocultural, economic, educational factors, family environment, age groups, ethnic groups). In addition, environmental strategies, food policies, educational policies, social policies, consumer literacy, citizen participation, qualitative evaluation, research on dietary habits and food transitions (challenges in the analysis of food consumption: methods, approaches, food composition, etc.) as well as investigations related to sustainability of interventions. Quantitative research (observational or intervention studies) and qualitative research fit well within the scope of this Special Issue.

Dr. Carmen Pérez-Rodrigo
Dr. Javier Aranceta-Bartrina
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • community-based interventions
  • community participation
  • food policy
  • food habits
  • dietary intake
  • social influences
  • environmental influences
  • physical activity
  • consumer literacy

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Identifying Participants Who Would Benefit the Most from an Adult Food-literacy Program
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(7), 1272; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16071272
Received: 13 March 2019 / Revised: 4 April 2019 / Accepted: 5 April 2019 / Published: 9 April 2019
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Abstract
Food literacy programs aim to improve behaviours required to achieve a quality diet. The objectives of this study were to assess the demographic, food literacy related and dietary behaviour of participants enrolling in Food Sensations® for Adults, a free four-week food literacy [...] Read more.
Food literacy programs aim to improve behaviours required to achieve a quality diet. The objectives of this study were to assess the demographic, food literacy related and dietary behaviour of participants enrolling in Food Sensations® for Adults, a free four-week food literacy program and identify the subgroup of participants who benefit most. Cross-sectional pre-program questionnaire data (n = 1626) from participants enrolling in the program was used to stratify into low, middle and high food-literacy tertiles. Factor scores from a reliability analysis of food literacy behaviours were then used to produce a composite score). Participants were 80.2% female, 56% aged 26 to 45 years and 73.3% from low to middle socio-economic areas. Demographic characteristics were not a significant predictor of the lowest composite food-literacy group. Those with the lowest composite food-literacy tertile score were more likely to have lower self-rated cooking skills, a negative attitude to the cost of healthy foods, lower intakes of fruits and vegetables and a higher frequency of consuming takeaway food and sugary drinks. Food literacy programs must focus on recruiting those who have low self-rated cooking skills, who consider healthy foods expensive and have poor dietary intakes and will most likely to benefit from such programs. Full article
Open AccessArticle Are Adolescent Body Image Concerns Associated with Health-Compromising Physical Activity Behaviours?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(7), 1225; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16071225
Received: 26 January 2019 / Revised: 18 March 2019 / Accepted: 3 April 2019 / Published: 5 April 2019
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Abstract
The present study aimed to assess the-prevalence of health-compromising eating and physical activity behaviours, and to test their associations with physical activity, internalisation of sociocultural attitudes towards appearance, and body image in a sample of adolescents of both genders. A total sample of [...] Read more.
The present study aimed to assess the-prevalence of health-compromising eating and physical activity behaviours, and to test their associations with physical activity, internalisation of sociocultural attitudes towards appearance, and body image in a sample of adolescents of both genders. A total sample of 736 adolescents (437 or 59.4% were girls) participated in the study. The participants ranged in age from 16 to 19 years (x = 17.2, SD = 0.6). The sample completed a questionnaire measuring body mass index, the risk of eating disorders, body image, internalisation of sociocultural ideals of appearance, health-compromising eating behaviours (HCEB), and health-compromising weight control related to physical activity behaviours (HCPAB). Logistic regressions were used to assess the associations between the study variables and predictors of HCEB and HCPAB. The results of the study showed a relatively high prevalence of HCEB with a significantly higher prevalence in girls and participants with a higher BMI. The study also demonstrated that the prevalence of adolescent HCPAB was higher than HCEB. The internalisation of sociocultural attitudes towards appearance and body image concerns were higher in the HCEB and HCPAB groups. Female gender (OR = 1.88; 95% PI = 1.10–3.18), HCPAB (OR = 1.19; 95% PI = 1.10–1.28), a preoccupation with being overweight (OR = 3.43; 95% PI = 2.52–4.66), and body weight evaluation as too high (OR = 2.40; 95% PI = 1.57–3.68) were significant predictors of HCEB. More frequent physical activity (OR = 3.02; 95% PI = 1.76–5.17), HCEB (OR = 1.22; 95% PI = 1.11–1.32), and perceived pressures to conform to popular beauty ideals (OR = 1.51; 95% PI = 1.12–2.03) predicted higher HCPAB. HCPAB is an important variable associated with adolescents’ body image, physical activity, and weight control. The results of the present study are important for health promotion and education programs addressing adolescents’ healthy lifestyle, weight control, and body image concerns. Full article
Open AccessArticle Associations of Genetic Variations in ABCA1 and Lifestyle Factors with Coronary Artery Disease in a Southern Chinese Population with Dyslipidemia: A Nested Case-Control Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(5), 786; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16050786
Received: 28 December 2018 / Revised: 6 February 2019 / Accepted: 26 February 2019 / Published: 4 March 2019
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Abstract
Coronary artery disease has become a major health concern over the past several decades. We aimed to explore the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ATP-binding cassette subfamily A member 1 (ABCA1) and lifestyle factors with coronary artery disease [...] Read more.
Coronary artery disease has become a major health concern over the past several decades. We aimed to explore the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ATP-binding cassette subfamily A member 1 (ABCA1) and lifestyle factors with coronary artery disease (CAD) in dyslipidemia. This nested case-control study included 173 patients with CAD and 500 matched control individuals (1:3, case: control) from a district in southern China. We collected medical reports, lifestyle details, and blood samples of individuals with dyslipidemia and used the polymerase chain reaction-ligase detection reaction method to genotype the SNPs. The CC genotype of the additive and recessive models of rs4149339, together with regular intake of fried foods or dessert, increased the risk of CAD (adjusted odd ratio (OR) = 1.91, p = 0.030; adjusted OR = 1.97, p = 0.017; adjusted OR = 1.80, p = 0.002; adjusted OR = 1.98, p = 0.001). The AT + AA genotype of the dominant model of rs4743763 and moderate/heavy physical activity reduced the risk of CAD (adjusted OR = 0.66, p = 0.030; adjusted OR = 0.44, p = 0.001). The CT + CC genotype of the dominant model of rs2472386 reduced the risk of CAD only in males (adjusted OR = 0.36, p = 0.001). The interaction between rs4149339 and rs4743763 of ABCA1 and haplotype CTT (comprising rs4149339, rs4743763, and rs2472386) appeared to increase the risk of CAD (relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) = 3.19, p = 0.045; OR = 1.49, p = 0.019). Polymorphisms of rs4149339, rs4743763 and rs2472386 in ABCA1 and three lifestyle factors (physical activity, fried food intake, and dessert intake) were associated with CAD in people with dyslipidemia in southern China. These results provide the theoretical basis for gene screening and the prevention of chronic cardiovascular diseases. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview Data Collection Instruments for Obesogenic Environments in Adults: A Scoping Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(8), 1414; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16081414
Received: 14 March 2019 / Revised: 10 April 2019 / Accepted: 17 April 2019 / Published: 19 April 2019
PDF Full-text (545 KB)
Abstract
The rise in obesity prevalence has increased research interest in the obesogenic environment and its influence on excess weight. The aim of the present study was to review and map data collection instruments for obesogenic environments in adults in order to provide an [...] Read more.
The rise in obesity prevalence has increased research interest in the obesogenic environment and its influence on excess weight. The aim of the present study was to review and map data collection instruments for obesogenic environments in adults in order to provide an overview of the existing evidence and enable comparisons. Through the scoping review method, different databases and webpages were searched between January 1997 and May 2018. Instruments were included if they targeted adults. The documents were categorised as food environment or built environment. In terms of results, 92 instruments were found: 46 instruments measuring the food environment, 42 measuring the built environment, and 4 that characterised both environments. Numerous diverse instruments have been developed to characterise the obesogenic environment, and some of them have been developed based on existing ones; however, most of them have not been validated and there is very little similarity between them, hindering comparison of the results obtained. In addition, most of them were developed and used in the United States and were written in English. In conclusion, there is a need for a robust instrument, improving or combining existing ones, for use within and across countries, and more sophisticated study designs where the environment is contemplated in an interdisciplinary approach. Full article
Open AccessReview Measuring and Understanding Food Insecurity in Australia: A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(3), 476; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16030476
Received: 11 January 2019 / Revised: 31 January 2019 / Accepted: 1 February 2019 / Published: 6 February 2019
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Abstract
The number of Australians seeking food aid has increased in recent years; however, the current variability in the measurement of food insecurity means that the prevalence and severity of food insecurity in Australia is likely underreported. This is compounded by infrequent national health [...] Read more.
The number of Australians seeking food aid has increased in recent years; however, the current variability in the measurement of food insecurity means that the prevalence and severity of food insecurity in Australia is likely underreported. This is compounded by infrequent national health surveys that measure food insecurity, resulting in outdated population-level food insecurity data. This review sought to investigate the breadth of food insecurity research conducted in Australia to evaluate how this construct is being measured. A systematic review was conducted to collate the available Australian research. Fifty-seven publications were reviewed. Twenty-two used a single-item measure to examine food security status; 11 used the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Household Food Security Survey Module (HFSSM); two used the Radimer/Cornell instrument; one used the Household Food and Nutrition Security Survey (HFNSS); while the remainder used a less rigorous or unidentified method. A wide range in prevalence and severity of food insecurity in the community was reported; food insecurity ranged from 2% to 90%, depending on the measurement tool and population under investigation. Based on the findings of this review, the authors suggest that there needs to be greater consistency in measuring food insecurity, and that work is needed to create a measure of food insecurity tailored for the Australian context. Such a tool will allow researchers to gain a clear understanding of the prevalence of food insecurity in Australia to create better policy and practice responses. Full article
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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