ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Environmental Research, Public Health, and Dynamic Open Innovation: From Smart Cities to the Sharing Economy"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Science and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. JinHyo Joseph Yun
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
DGIST (Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology), 333, Techno jungang-daero, Hyeonpung-eup, Dalseong-gun, Daegu, Korea
Interests: open innovation; business model; open innovation economy; social open innovation; Schumpeterian dynamics; complexity; game theory; political economics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Sang-Don Lee
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Sciences & Engineering, College of Engineering, Ewha Womans University, 03760 Seoul, Korea
Interests: open innovation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Eung-Do Kim
E-Mail
Guest Editor
ChungBook National University, Cheongju, South Korea
Dr. Lei Shi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Resources Environmental & Chemical Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330029, China
Interests: industrial ecology; circular economy; industrial ecosystem complexity; Eco-innovation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Among the recent changes in the environment, climate change, water quality and air pollution pose a major threat to our health, and the need for international and national environmental research is growing. In addition, the efficiency of the environmental impact assessment system should be supplemented by preparation for large environmental pollution phenomena. Therefore, this Special Issue is prepared to introduce new ideas on environmental issues by introducing research trends and current techniques.

<Time schedule of This special issue>

Open: 1 June 2019
Any SOItmC 2019 authors in additon to the planned papers can apply at this special issue  after full paper submission at SOItmC 2019 platfrom until  May 31t and paying registration fee.
Close: 31 December 2019
All papers at this special issue should be submitted until 31st of December, 2019.


Prof. Dr. JinHyo Joseph Yun
Managing Guest Editor

Dr. Sang-Don Lee
Dr. Eung-Do Kim
Dr. Lei Shi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Environmental impact assessment
  • Air pollution
  • Industry
  • Policy
  • Open innovation
  • Business model
  • Complexity
  • Public Health
  • Schumpeterian economy or innovation

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Phenological Response in the Trophic Levels to Climate Change in Korea
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 1086; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031086 - 26 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 597
Abstract
The response of the phenological events of individual species to climate change is not isolated, but is connected through interaction with other species at the same or adjacent trophic level. Using long-term phenological data observed since 1976 in Korea, whose temperature has risen [...] Read more.
The response of the phenological events of individual species to climate change is not isolated, but is connected through interaction with other species at the same or adjacent trophic level. Using long-term phenological data observed since 1976 in Korea, whose temperature has risen more steeply than the average global temperature, this study conducted phenological analysis (differ-ences in the phenology of groups, differences in phenological shifts due to climate change, differ-ences in phenological sensitivity to climate by groups, and the change of phenological day differ-ences among interacting groups). The phenological shift of the producer group (plants) was found to be negative in all researched species, which means that it blooms quickly over the years. The regression slope of consumers (primary consumers and secondary consumers) was generally posi-tive which means that the phenological events of these species tended to be later during the study period. The inter-regional deviation of phenological events was not large for any plant except for plum tree and Black locust. In addition, regional variations in high trophic levels of secondary consumers tended to be greater than that of producers and primary consumers. Among the studied species, plum was the most sensitive to temperature, and when the temperature rose by 1 °C, the flowering time of plum decreased by 7.20 days. As a result of checking the day differences in the phenological events of the interacting species, the phenological events of species were reversed, and butterflies have appeared earlier than plum, Korean forsythia, and Korean rosebay since 1990. Using long-term data from Korea, this study investigated differences in phenological reactions among trophic groups. There is a possibility of a phenological mismatch between trophic groups in the future if global warming continues due to differences in sensitivity to climate and phenological shifts between trophic levels. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Economic Value Estimation of the Natural Heritage of the Tatra National Park
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(9), 3032; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17093032 - 27 Apr 2020
Viewed by 1056
Abstract
The aim of the study is to determine the economic value of the Tatra National Park. The willingness to pay approximation was used. Additionally, a questionnaire survey was applied in order to collect data. It contained a hypothetical event, and respondents expressed their [...] Read more.
The aim of the study is to determine the economic value of the Tatra National Park. The willingness to pay approximation was used. Additionally, a questionnaire survey was applied in order to collect data. It contained a hypothetical event, and respondents expressed their willingness to pay an annual entry fee to the Tatra National Park in exchange for a guarantee of stopping the interference to its integrity. The total number of respondents was 921. The results show that the income level has a positive impact on respondents’ willingness to pay for entry to the Tatra National Park. With the increase of fee, the willingness to pay for entry to the Tatra National Park decreased by 2.2% for every additional price increase. The resulting value of the Tatra National Park, with the limits of the presented research mentioned in the paper, is approximately 17.5 million €. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
The Equity of Health Care Spending in South Korea: Testing the Impact of Publicness
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(5), 1775; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051775 - 09 Mar 2020
Viewed by 1154
Abstract
This paper examined the important organizational and managerial factors of publicness for the equity of health care. The extent of organizational publicness was measured with key independent variables such as ownership, evaluation, and accreditation. The dependent variable was measured by three equity indicators [...] Read more.
This paper examined the important organizational and managerial factors of publicness for the equity of health care. The extent of organizational publicness was measured with key independent variables such as ownership, evaluation, and accreditation. The dependent variable was measured by three equity indicators for patients under medical care and veterans care: financial inequity, social equity, and overall equity. We analyzed unbalanced panel data with 328 general hospitals between 2008 and 2012. We performed panel analysis with fixed and random effects. Our findings illustrate that government ownership is significantly associated with differences in equity indicators. Government owned hospitals show the better performance for equity than nonprofit and individually owned hospitals do. Compared to nonprofit and individually owned hospitals, government owned hospitals have a higher share of medical payment bills and health care spending for the disadvantaged but a lower proportion of out-of-pocket payment. Government evaluation is also significantly related to better equity performance. There are, however, significantly negative interactions between hospital government ownership and the size of medical payment bills. We found a significant tendency that the more medical payments, the less responsiveness to the equity of health care in government owned hospitals. Future research in hospital performance is required to consider not only sectoral differences but also the negative proclivity of public hospitals that shrink health care services for the poor. Further research is also expected to explore what sectoral identities and behaviors across public, nonprofit, and private hospitals influence the level of equity or inequity in health care. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Sustainable Agriculture by Increasing Nitrogen Fertilizer Efficiency Using Low-Resolution Camera Mounted on Unmanned Aerial Vehicles
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(20), 3893; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16203893 - 14 Oct 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1238
Abstract
Nitrogen use efficiency in modern agriculture is very low. It means that a lot of synthetic chemicals are wasted rather than utilized by crops. This can cause more problems where the soil surface is thin and rocky like Jeju Island in the Republic [...] Read more.
Nitrogen use efficiency in modern agriculture is very low. It means that a lot of synthetic chemicals are wasted rather than utilized by crops. This can cause more problems where the soil surface is thin and rocky like Jeju Island in the Republic of Korea. This is because overly used nitrogen fertilizer can be washed into the underground water and pollute it. Thus, it would be important to monitor the nitrogen deficiency of crops in the field to provide the right amount of nitrogen in a timely manner so that nitrogen waste can be limited. To achieve this, the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) was used to monitor chlorophyll content, which is tightly associated with nitrogen content in the buckwheat field. The NDVI was calculated with the data obtained by a low-resolution camera mounted on an unmanned aerial vehicle. The results showed that the NDVI can estimate the chlorophyll content of buckwheat. These simple but clear results imply that precision agriculture could be achieved even with a low-resolution camera in a cost-effective manner to reduce the pollution of underground water. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Application of Habitat Evaluation Procedure with Quantifying the Eco-Corridor in the Process of Environmental Impact Assessment
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(8), 1437; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16081437 - 23 Apr 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1199
Abstract
In contrast to other fields, environmental protection (e.g., habitat protection) often fails to include quantitative evaluation as part of the existing environmental impact assessment (EIA) process, and therefore the EIA is often a poor forecasting tool, which makes selecting a reasonable plan of [...] Read more.
In contrast to other fields, environmental protection (e.g., habitat protection) often fails to include quantitative evaluation as part of the existing environmental impact assessment (EIA) process, and therefore the EIA is often a poor forecasting tool, which makes selecting a reasonable plan of action difficult. In this study, we used the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) to quantify the long-term effects of a road construction project on an ecosystem. The water deer (Hydropotes inermis) was selected as the species of study since it uses an optimum habitat; water deer habitat data were collected on vegetation cover, stream water density, geographic contour, land use class, and road networks. The Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) and Cumulative Habitat Unit (CHU) values for the water deer were estimated to investigate the major land cover classes, the national river systems, and vegetation cover. Results showed that the environmental impact in the road construction project area would result in a net ecological loss value of 1211 without installation of an eco-corridor, which reduced to 662 with an eco-corridor, providing a 55% increase in the net value after 50 years of the mitigation plan. Comparing the 13 proposed ecological mitigation corridors, the corridor that would result in the highest net increase (with an increase of 69.5), was corridor #4, which was regarded as the most appropriate corridor to properly connect water deer habitat. In sum, the study derived the net increase in quantitative values corresponding with different mitigation methods over time for a road construction project; this procedure can be effectively utilized in the future to select the location of ecological corridors while considering the costs of constructing them. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Urbanization and Waterborne Pathogen Emergence in Low-Income Countries: Where and How to Conduct Surveys?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 480; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020480 - 11 Jan 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1492
Abstract
A major forthcoming sanitary issue concerns the apparition and spreading of drug-resistant microorganisms, potentially threatening millions of humans. In low-income countries, polluted urban runoff and open sewage channels are major sources of microbes. These microbes join natural microbial communities in aquatic ecosystems already [...] Read more.
A major forthcoming sanitary issue concerns the apparition and spreading of drug-resistant microorganisms, potentially threatening millions of humans. In low-income countries, polluted urban runoff and open sewage channels are major sources of microbes. These microbes join natural microbial communities in aquatic ecosystems already impacted by various chemicals, including antibiotics. These composite microbial communities must adapt to survive in such hostile conditions, sometimes promoting the selection of antibiotic-resistant microbial strains by gene transfer. The low probability of exchanges between planktonic microorganisms within the water column may be significantly improved if their contact was facilitated by particular meeting places. This could be specifically the case within biofilms that develop on the surface of the myriads of floating macroplastics increasingly polluting urban tropical surface waters. Moreover, as uncultivable bacterial strains could be involved, analyses of the microbial communities in their whole have to be performed. This means that new-omic technologies must be routinely implemented in low- and middle-income countries to detect the appearance of resistance genes in microbial ecosystems, especially when considering the new ‘plastic context.’ We summarize the related current knowledge in this short review paper to anticipate new strategies for monitoring and surveying microbial communities. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop