Special Issue "The 4th Industrial Revolution from Open Innovation in Manufacturing and Service Industry to Cyber-Physics"

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. JinHyo Joseph Yun *

Convergence Research Center for Future Automotive Technology, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), Daegu, Korea
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +82-53-785-4410 (010-6697-8355)
Interests: open innovation; business model; open innovation economy; social open innovation; schumpeterian dynamics; game theory; political economics; complexity
* Managing Guest Editor
Guest Editor
Prof. Valentina Della Corte

Department of Economics, Management and Institutions, University of Naples Federico II, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: inter-firm collaboration; strategic networks; coopetition; tourism management; dynamic capabilities; value creation and appropriation; value co-creation; industry 4.0; open innovation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue will publish some selected papers from annual conference of SOItmC 2018. Suitable topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Open Innovation
  • Business Model
  • Schumpeterian Economics
  • Complex economics
  • Open Service Innovation
  • Cyber-Physics

The Article Processing Changes (APC) of the first 24 accepted papers including Keynotes from the planned paper list will be supported by payment from DGIST (SOItmC) to MDPI. Authors of these paper should include an acknowledgement following one of the two examples below:

(1) This paper received the ‘best paper award’ at SOItmC 2018 conference, and the publishing fee was supported by DGIST (DGIST-IT-18-01)
(2) This paper was presented as a keynote speech at SOItmC 2018, and the publishing fee was supported by DGIST (DGIST-IT-18-01)

With the exception of the nine keynote speech papers, papers which were selected at JOItmC to form a Special Issue of SOItmC 2018 will be recommended for the Best Paper Award of SOItmC 2018.

Dr. JinHyo Joseph Yun
Dr. Valentina Della Corte
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Open Innovation: Technology, Market, and Complexity is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 650 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (22 papers)

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Open AccessArticle Carbon Sequestration in the Urban Areas of Seoul with Climate Change: Implication for Open Innovation in Environmental Industry
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(4), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4040048
Received: 15 June 2018 / Revised: 27 August 2018 / Accepted: 27 August 2018 / Published: 8 October 2018
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Abstract
This study estimates the impact of potential climate change, and human interference (anthropogenic deforestation), on temperate forest carbon pool change in the capital area of South Korea, using a dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM). Additionally, the characteristics of forest carbon pool change were
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This study estimates the impact of potential climate change, and human interference (anthropogenic deforestation), on temperate forest carbon pool change in the capital area of South Korea, using a dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM). Additionally, the characteristics of forest carbon pool change were simulated based on a biogeochemical module. The change of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration is deeply related to the change of the forest carbon pool, which is estimated with the measures of Net Primary Productivity (NPP), and Soil Carbon Storage (SCS). NPP and SCS were estimated at 2.02–7.43 tC ha−1 year−1 and 34.55–84.81 tC ha−1, respectively, during the period 1971–2000. SCS showed a significant decreasing tendency under the conditions of increasing air temperature, and precipitation, in the near future (2021–2050), and far future (2071–2100), which were simulated with future-climate scenario data without any human interference. Besides, it is estimated that the temporal change in NPP indicates only a small decrease, which is little influenced by potential climate change. In the case of potential climate change plus human interference, the decrease rate of NPP and SCS were simulated at 17–33% and 21–46%, respectively, during 2000–2100. Furthermore, the effect of potential human interference contributes to 83–93% and 61–54% of the decrease rate of NPP and SCS, respectively. The decline in the forest carbon pool simulated in this study can play a positive role in increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide. Consequently, the effect of potential human interference can further accelerate the decline of the temperate forest carbon pool. For the effective reduction of carbon dioxide emissions in urbanizing areas, it would be more effective to control human interference. Consequently, this study suggests that a rate of reforestation corresponding to the deforestation rate should be at least maintained, with long term monitoring and modeling-related studies, against climate change problems. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Regional Innovation Systems in Policy Laboratories
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(4), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4040044
Received: 31 August 2018 / Revised: 17 September 2018 / Accepted: 18 September 2018 / Published: 21 September 2018
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Abstract
Innovation policy and business strategy often expect that investing in private and public research and development will immediately produce a flow of products and processes with high commercial and social returns. Policymakers and managers implicitly follow the logic underlying most linear innovation models
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Innovation policy and business strategy often expect that investing in private and public research and development will immediately produce a flow of products and processes with high commercial and social returns. Policymakers and managers implicitly follow the logic underlying most linear innovation models assuming a well-defined and uni-directional relationship between R&D spending as input and innovation rents as output of the innovation process. Modern innovation economics dismisses the simplified approximation of knowledge by R&D investment and, instead, considers complex knowledge generation and diffusion processes in innovation networks. From this angle, the disappointing performance of traditional approaches is traced back to strong limits of conventional steering, control, and policy instruments. In this paper, we show that the new view of knowledge generation and diffusion in innovation networks allows for an alternative and has led to systemic approaches in innovation analyses. Combined with computational approaches like agent-based modeling, this new view enables today innovative tools in policy consulting. Using the example of regional innovation policy, we introduce a policy laboratory in which innovation processes can be analyzed in depth to see the impact of different innovation policy instruments in-silico. This ex-ante evaluation helps considerably to improve the understanding of innovation processes and with it the performance of innovation policy. Full article
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Open AccessArticle E-Payment Technology Effect on Bank Performance in Emerging Economies–Evidence from Nigeria
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(4), 43; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4040043
Received: 3 August 2018 / Revised: 24 August 2018 / Accepted: 27 August 2018 / Published: 21 September 2018
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Abstract
The development of the financial sector has been a major growth driver in all economies, especially in emerging economies. Part of the financial innovations in the sector in recent times is the electronic payment system. Several studies in developed countries have substantiated the
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The development of the financial sector has been a major growth driver in all economies, especially in emerging economies. Part of the financial innovations in the sector in recent times is the electronic payment system. Several studies in developed countries have substantiated the positive transformation of this financial innovation. This paper therefore contributes to this debate with three research innovations: first, it adopts a new measure of bank performance—the sortino index; second, it relates market risk exposure of banks to electronic payment technologies; and third, it controls for “without effects” of these innovations on bank performance using interacting dummies. Based on the time dimensional and panel least square models, it finds that bank performance increased after the adoption of electronic payment technologies. Finally, its findings show that bank performance contradicts autoregressive and random walk processes and thus implies that investors should not be disturbed about previous bank performances but concerned about current bank resources. Full article
Open AccessArticle Sustainable Production Scheduling in Open Innovation Perspective under the Fourth Industrial Revolution
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(4), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4040042
Received: 15 June 2018 / Revised: 16 August 2018 / Accepted: 22 August 2018 / Published: 21 September 2018
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Abstract
This research addresses a specific issue in the field of operation scheduling. Even though there are lots of researches on the field of planning and scheduling, a specific scheduling problem is introduced here. We focus on the operation scheduling requirements that the Fourth
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This research addresses a specific issue in the field of operation scheduling. Even though there are lots of researches on the field of planning and scheduling, a specific scheduling problem is introduced here. We focus on the operation scheduling requirements that the Fourth Industrial Revolution has brought currently. From the point of view of open innovation, operation scheduling is known as the one that is using the Internet of Things, Cloud Computing, Big Data, and Mobile technology. To build proper operation systems under the Fourth Industrial Revolution, it is very essential to devise effective and efficient scheduling methodology to improve product quality, customer delivery, manufacturing flexibility, cost saving, and market competence. A scheduling problem on designated parallel equipments, where some equipments are grouped according to the recipe of lots, is considered. This implies that a lot associated with a specific recipe is preferred to be processed on an equipment among predetermined (designated) ones regardless of parallel ones. A setup operation occurs between different recipes of lots. In order to minimize completion time of the last lot, a scheduling algorithm is proposed. We conducted a simulation study with randomly generated problems, and the proposed algorithm has shown desirable and better performance that can be applied in real-time scheduling. Full article
Open AccessArticle A Study on the Factors Affecting Decrease in the Government Corruption and Mediating Effects of the Development of ICT and E-Government—A Cross-Country Analysis
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(3), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4030041
Received: 10 May 2018 / Revised: 23 August 2018 / Accepted: 23 August 2018 / Published: 3 September 2018
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Abstract
Purpose: As the development of high technology, information and communications technology (ICT) and e-government has pursued improving efficiency, productivity, democracy, responsiveness and transparency in government, the demand for efficient government administration systems and government transparency has increased. Thus, this study aims to derive
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Purpose: As the development of high technology, information and communications technology (ICT) and e-government has pursued improving efficiency, productivity, democracy, responsiveness and transparency in government, the demand for efficient government administration systems and government transparency has increased. Thus, this study aims to derive factors contributing to decreases in corruption based on a literature review, and to examine the relationship between e-government and government corruption through a cross-country analysis. Design/Methodology/Approach: This study first analyzed how government corruption in each country is influenced by e-government user status, governance, and regulations. With ICT and e-government development as mediating variables, the effects of various factors on government corruption were examined by country. That is, the mediating effects of ICT use and e-government development (telecommunication infrastructure, online service, e-participation) were assessed in order to define the relationship between users, governance, regulations and government corruption. This study ensured objectivity of data by utilizing statistics provided by credible organizations such as the Transparency International (TI), Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and United Nations (UN) and differs from past research in that it focused on the mediating effects of e-government. In this study, a cross-country analysis (with data from 120 countries), a three-step analysis of the mediating effects (Baron and Kenny, 1986) and a Sobel test (empirical analysis) were used. Results: The results of the analysis show a significant relationship between e-government user levels, governance, government regulation, and government corruption. In addition, the level of current ICT development and e-government partially mediated the effects of user levels, governance and government regulation on decreases in government corruption. These results show that the development of ICT and e-government mediate and contribute to a decrease in government corruption, and that increased utilization of ICT and monitoring government actions using such technologies will be one major factor in decreasing government corruption. Implications: These findings suggest an efficient and effective direction for future anti-corruption strategies in government policy making and implementation processes. Full article
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Open AccessArticle The Efficiency Analysis of National R&D Planning for the Field of Precision Medicine in Korea
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(3), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4030039
Received: 14 June 2018 / Revised: 9 August 2018 / Accepted: 10 August 2018 / Published: 22 August 2018
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Abstract
Precision medicine has received a lot of attention in recent years and we have not yet found any research cases that apply Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) to investment decision making in this area. The purpose of this study is to analyze the relative
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Precision medicine has received a lot of attention in recent years and we have not yet found any research cases that apply Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) to investment decision making in this area. The purpose of this study is to analyze the relative efficiency of candidate technology sectors in order to determine priorities for government investment in precision medicine. The results of the efficiency analysis can be used as an important reference for government policy makers to determine the amount of government investment in the next year for each candidate technology sector. The candidate technology for government investment in precision medicine was decided for 23 sectors based on the data analysis and the opinions of expert committees. This study applies the input-oriented DEA in regard to 23 technology sectors, which is widely used to analyze relative efficiency in terms of inputs versus outputs and to enhance efficiency through the propositional reduction of inputs. The input variables include the government’s research and development (R&D) investment and forward and backward industry linkage effects. The output variables are the employment creation effect, value-added effect, number of Korean patents, and number of Korean papers. Our analysis results show that the 23 technology sectors in precision medicine overall have a high efficiency, with the exception of the biobank technology sector. Therefore, since the Biobank technology sector has strong infrastructure characteristics, it seems to require continuous investment. The efficiency of DEA is high in most precision medicine sectors; therefore, overall, investing in these technologies is expected to yield good benefits. Full article
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Open AccessArticle The System Thinking Perspective in the Open-Innovation Research: A Systematic Review
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(3), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4030038
Received: 20 June 2018 / Revised: 14 August 2018 / Accepted: 14 August 2018 / Published: 18 August 2018
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Abstract
The new logics of competitions are mostly based on exploiting relationships to implement new mechanisms in managing Knowledge. Today, a successful company should be, lean, modular, and with a smart approach to new products development. In this context, the source of competitive advantage
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The new logics of competitions are mostly based on exploiting relationships to implement new mechanisms in managing Knowledge. Today, a successful company should be, lean, modular, and with a smart approach to new products development. In this context, the source of competitive advantage cannot be found into a static heterogeneity of resources, but companies must be able to create and manage a dynamic competitive process to continuously reinvent their products/services and to re-combine their resources with their partners’ ones. A paradigm for this behavior is the Open Innovation one, as created by Chesbrough. According to the rules of this paradigm, companies have to acknowledge that they operate in a network of relationships, they must be open to cooperate with their external partners, and they must not try to limit their actions in reaching only for some pre-defined result. So, Open Innovation Networks appear to be similar to those described by the scholars in the Complex Adaptive Systems field where the actions of the system, and of its parts, are the result of the various actors’ interactions in an emergent way. In this paper, we use a Systematic Literature Review approach to explore how the main topics in the System Thinking Perspective, and in particular, those related to Complex Systems, are linked to the Open Innovation studies. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Development of the WISH (Well-Aging Indexing for Senior Health) Platform for Happiness
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(3), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4030036
Received: 7 June 2018 / Revised: 6 August 2018 / Accepted: 7 August 2018 / Published: 9 August 2018
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Abstract
Humans now have a life expectancy of nearly 90 years and, as a result, society is rapidly aging. These longer life spans have, however, increased the average length of hospitalization for elderly adults suffering from chronic diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and encephalopathy.
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Humans now have a life expectancy of nearly 90 years and, as a result, society is rapidly aging. These longer life spans have, however, increased the average length of hospitalization for elderly adults suffering from chronic diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and encephalopathy. In a recent survey of 10 well-being indices for elderly adults, the top demands for well-being are physical, spiritual, and psychological. Thus, we developed the WISH (Well-aging Indexing for Senior Health) Platform to enhance the normalizing exponents using survey data. Nowadays, the incidence of many chronic diseases is increasing. Thus, we designed the WISH Platform using clinical research on depression, cerebral infarction, coronary artery, and rheumatism, which are common diseases in Koreans. By applying this study to chronic diseases, which manifest differently among elderly adults across different countries, it is possible to determine influential nutrition and life patterns to create a standardized index. Such an index will help create value for the happiness of active elderly people, which in turn will aid in their efforts to maintain health; it may even benefit health promotion in other age groups. Full article
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Open AccessArticle The Impact of E-Hailing Competition on the Urban Taxi Ecosystem and Governance Strategy from a Rent-Seeking Perspective: The China E-Hailing Platform
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(3), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4030035
Received: 8 June 2018 / Revised: 18 July 2018 / Accepted: 7 August 2018 / Published: 9 August 2018
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Abstract
Nowadays, the way of Internet travel in China presents diversified development. Rapid expansion in the personal mobile terminal and Internet infrastructure for the Internet travels to the ecosystem of development and evolution. This paper explores the influence of the expansion of the e-hailing
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Nowadays, the way of Internet travel in China presents diversified development. Rapid expansion in the personal mobile terminal and Internet infrastructure for the Internet travels to the ecosystem of development and evolution. This paper explores the influence of the expansion of the e-hailing ecological community on the urban taxi ecological community, and the problems of profit-seeking, rent-setting, and rent-seeking from the capital behind the e-hailing platform. With entrance into the urban travel ecosystem with ride-hailing platform enterprises and emerging business models, how does (venture) capital cause the change of the urban taxi ecology? Is it essentially the rent-setting and rent-seeking behavior of capital that obtains the market monopoly status of e-hailing? What are the difficulties for governments and the public in regulating rent-seeking in capital and emerging business models? The aim is to explore the new governing strategy of urban taxi ecology. The paper chooses the case of the DiDi e-hailing platform, and performs a study on the utility and indifference curves quantitatively, and constructs a rent-seeking liaison between platform’s entry into the market and the platform’s monopoly. In this paper, the ecological system of the taxi industry is first sorted out, and the community relationship between the traditional cruise taxi industry and the e-hailing industry, and their market supply and demand relationship are clarified. Secondly, from the main theoretical perspective of rent-seeking behavior, this paper analyzes the causes of the rent-setting rent-seeking behavior of e-hailing platform enterprises and the venture capital behind them, and the problems of public power supervision. As the red pack & subsidy market strategy changes the utility (indifference) curve of passengers, the consumption preference of passengers is more inclined to e-hailing. With the expansion of the e-hailing community, the e-hailing platform partly replaces the regulatory role of the government, and venture capital investors as rational-economic individuals, and its agency responsibilities and profit-seeking characteristics naturally form a contradictory pair. The introduction of competition is a means among market policies to break monopoly. Even so, commercial competitors are able to avoid laws or regulations by the means of commercial mergers or through the implementation of variable interest entities control. Governments should therefore seek to participate actively in the governance of such organizations. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Measuring the Efficiency of U.S. Pharmaceutical Companies Based on Open Innovation Types
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(3), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4030034
Received: 26 June 2018 / Revised: 24 July 2018 / Accepted: 27 July 2018 / Published: 8 August 2018
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Abstract
The pharmaceutical industry, where research and development (R&D) efficiency is central to company survival, has recently faced significant challenges. To increase efficiency, companies must implement strategies such as open innovation (OI), wherein they sell their intellectual property, maximize their use of external resources,
[...] Read more.
The pharmaceutical industry, where research and development (R&D) efficiency is central to company survival, has recently faced significant challenges. To increase efficiency, companies must implement strategies such as open innovation (OI), wherein they sell their intellectual property, maximize their use of external resources, adjust their structures, and implement new business models. In this study, we divided 701 U.S. pharmaceutical companies according to their OI strategies to measure and compare their R&D efficiencies between 2001 and 2016. We analyzed the deal data of companies by first dividing them into four groups (inside-out, outside-in, coupled, and closed) to calculate R&D efficiency using stochastic and meta-frontier analyses. In the first group analysis, the coupled group shows high technical efficiency, but in an overall comparison, the inside-out group achieves the highest efficiency values. These values increased between 2005 and 2010, when the R&D crisis in the industry was great at its highest. We thus identified the characteristics of each group based on our results, and presented extensive analyses using a time-series comparison and enterprise-level analysis. We claim that pharmaceutical companies can still cope with the current R&D crisis by implementing different OI strategies. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Framing Open Innovation in Start-Ups’ Incubators: A Complexity Theory Perspective
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(3), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4030033
Received: 15 June 2018 / Revised: 25 July 2018 / Accepted: 3 August 2018 / Published: 7 August 2018
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Abstract
Recently, concepts and principles from the Complexity Theory (or, generally speaking, the complexity sciences) have been applied as a perspective for capturing the influence of the context, interaction, and adaption in the innovation processes, such as the ones enabled in the business incubators.
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Recently, concepts and principles from the Complexity Theory (or, generally speaking, the complexity sciences) have been applied as a perspective for capturing the influence of the context, interaction, and adaption in the innovation processes, such as the ones enabled in the business incubators. The purpose of this paper is to implement a frame of reference for understanding the start-ups’ incubator as a complex system where innovation, learning, and self-organization take place. We build on the interfaces between the Complexity Theory (i.e., complexity sciences) and Open Innovation literature to identify principles, patterns, and conditions that frame the incubation practices as simple rules aimed to sustain the innovation process towards the creation of new ventures. Results from the multiple case studies conducted in five incubators show that the features of variety, nonlinear interaction, interdependence, autonomy, and emergence of the incubation process framed as a complex system are enabled in different ways by the combination of the open innovation practices and services provided by the start-ups’ incubators, including the provision of physical infrastructure, access to funding streams, experts/entrepreneurs networking, education/workshops, mentorship, and advice. Full article
Open AccessArticle Learning Mode and Strategic Concept for the 4th Industrial Revolution
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(3), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4030032
Received: 13 June 2018 / Revised: 26 July 2018 / Accepted: 28 July 2018 / Published: 6 August 2018
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Abstract
Compared to information technology (IT) revolutions, which are characterized by disruptive innovations, the innovations required for the 4th Industrial Revolution will be characterized by the cumulativeness of the innovations. Therefore, we will need new modes of technological learning and new strategic concepts. The
[...] Read more.
Compared to information technology (IT) revolutions, which are characterized by disruptive innovations, the innovations required for the 4th Industrial Revolution will be characterized by the cumulativeness of the innovations. Therefore, we will need new modes of technological learning and new strategic concepts. The IT revolution can be divided into two parts: system integration and component supplying. Notice that all IT giants such as Apple and Google emerged only after Intel emerged as the dominant microprocessor unit (MPU) supplier. Therefore, we can ascertain that Intel emerged as a dominant MPU supplier by accommodating the different specifications made by Japanese customers in different industrial sectors. Thus, we will come to the concept of learning-by-accommodation as the dominant learning mode of IT module supplying, while the aforementioned IT giants implemented the mode of learning-by integration. The 4th Industrial Revolution will be characterized by technological evolutions rather than by disruptive innovations. They can be also decomposed into module supplying and the system integration. As to the mode of learning in the modules, we will find that the mode of learning will be prevalent in the same manner as IT module supplying, but in a more pre-emptive way. As for the feedback loops of the system integration, we will divide them into edge computing and the overall system solution. As for the edge solution, it is possible for latecomers to make a leapfrogging. In this context, we will make an analysis on the Chinese development of the “capacitor trolley bus” and come to a totally different mode of learning in the edge solution. We will name this mode “learning-by-porting”, using the terminology derived from the analysis of the design rules of a modular structure. By assuming that an overall feedback loop consists of a hierarchical structured collection of edge solutions, we can conclude that the overall solution is developed by multiple applications of the learning-by-porting of edge solutions. Additionally, the total system is a hierarchical structure, thus, a strategy toward the realization of the 4th industrial revolution will be a multilayered porting strategy. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Evaluating Determinant Priority of License Fee in Biotech Industry
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(3), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4030030
Received: 11 June 2018 / Revised: 15 July 2018 / Accepted: 27 July 2018 / Published: 2 August 2018
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Abstract
This research aimed to build a solid basis through analytic hierarchy process (AHP) analysis to develop a reliable and practical valuation model that reflects the characteristics of the biotech industry and propose a reference formula to estimate the license fee by drug class
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This research aimed to build a solid basis through analytic hierarchy process (AHP) analysis to develop a reliable and practical valuation model that reflects the characteristics of the biotech industry and propose a reference formula to estimate the license fee by drug class for potential business transactions. In this study, we reviewed 135 related studies and found 167 related determinants. We surveyed 25 or more specialists in the biopharmaceutical industries. The survey group consisted of National Research Institutes (‘Group 1’), Companies (‘Group 2’), and Government Agencies–Universities (‘Group 3’). The average of the total group and Group 3 showed the same tendency at a Level 3 ranking, where the priority in determining the license fee was arranged in the order of ‘the market factor, the technology factor, the financial factor, and the environmental factor’ in light of the factors, and ‘patent characteristics, licensee characteristics, and licensor characteristics’ for the characteristics. We noted that the patent characteristics were primarily significant in technology transactions and their contract fee in the groups (Total, Group 2 and Group 3), followed by licensee characteristics. In terms of the in-depth index, we noted that the development phase and attrition rate, intellectual property tradability, and licensee licensing experience, followed by quality of technology, were the most influential determinants. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Identifying Stakeholders and Interactions in the Dementia Café in Seongju through Empathic Service Design Approaches
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(3), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4030028
Received: 9 June 2018 / Revised: 14 July 2018 / Accepted: 16 July 2018 / Published: 18 July 2018
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Abstract
(1) Background: As we enter the experience economy, industrial design has focused on social innovation and has flowed into social design. This fresh design perspective has been employed in citizen-centered-policymaking through empathic approaches that emphasize the necessity of public service design. Focusing on
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(1) Background: As we enter the experience economy, industrial design has focused on social innovation and has flowed into social design. This fresh design perspective has been employed in citizen-centered-policymaking through empathic approaches that emphasize the necessity of public service design. Focusing on the results of a 2017 citizen design project, this study aims to identify the effectiveness of an empathic approach in improving public services through investigating stakeholders and their interactions of the Dementia Café in Seongju. (2) Methods: Our team conducted observations and interviews with 20 stakeholders to understand the operational environment of the café. Utilizing the information we gathered, we visualized data in a stakeholder map and carried out critical characteristics analysis (CC) to provide practitioners and researchers addressing the project with quick, intuitive understanding. (3) Results: Three themes were drawn from the observations and interviews conducted in the study: the sustainability of operation, locational and perceptional conditions, and management of clientele. The stakeholder map reveals broken interactions between the café’s staff and its associated hospital, and a loss of opportunities to offer customized administrational dementia care through the café. In the CC analysis, service providers’ patterns were vague while service receivers showed three discernable patterns indicating individualized responses to each group that might be effective. (4) Conclusions: The outcomes including difference of perspectives between the stakeholders confirm that adopting empathic approach enables various stakeholders to offer views and share ideas. Hence this approach possibly helps deliver tailored public services in a creative manner by opening and sharing government-ownership with the public. Since the research was accomplished primarily by qualitative approaches, there may still be limits caused by not including benefits of quantitative approaches in such a large-scaled survey, and these are subject to further research. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Exploring the Entrepreneurial Intention of Female Students in Italy
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(3), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4030027
Received: 17 May 2018 / Revised: 17 June 2018 / Accepted: 28 June 2018 / Published: 3 July 2018
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Abstract
The aim of this paper is to investigate the entrepreneurial intention of Italian female students according to the Ajzen’s Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB). In particular, we analysed the women’s intention to become entrepreneurs because the relevance of the female entrepreneurship phenomenon is
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The aim of this paper is to investigate the entrepreneurial intention of Italian female students according to the Ajzen’s Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB). In particular, we analysed the women’s intention to become entrepreneurs because the relevance of the female entrepreneurship phenomenon is a growing issue. Indeed, millions of women are involved in creating and operating enterprises, which suggests that women are an important engine of economic growth for developing countries. Using survey data from 441 Italian female students, we found that social pressure influences business students’ intention to become entrepreneurs. Focusing on female students, their intention is affected also by the perceived behavioural control. These results are of interest for policy makers and regulators in promoting entrepreneurial skills among young populations, with consequent reduction of the unemployment rate. Finally, this paper provides a new model that helps to understand the students’ entrepreneurial intentions based on gender role. Full article
Open AccessArticle Managing Strategic Partnerships with Universities in Innovation Ecosystems: A Research Agenda
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(3), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4030025
Received: 30 May 2018 / Revised: 13 June 2018 / Accepted: 25 June 2018 / Published: 28 June 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (345 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper proposes a research agenda for understanding how to establish and develop strategic partnerships with universities in innovation ecosystems, aimed to support the development of companies’ entrepreneurial and innovation development capacities. In particular, the paper suggests an integrated model to explore how
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This paper proposes a research agenda for understanding how to establish and develop strategic partnerships with universities in innovation ecosystems, aimed to support the development of companies’ entrepreneurial and innovation development capacities. In particular, the paper suggests an integrated model to explore how universities and companies establish, manage, and assess collaborative relationships to foster entrepreneurial and innovative capacity. The framework identifies four fundamental dimensions that characterise the role and function mechanisms of successful collaborative relationships: (1) the entrepreneurial learning network dynamics and the transformational patterns affecting the development of entrepreneurial capital of university-based innovation ecosystems; (2) the role and features of the university-based organisational units to support companies’ entrepreneurial and innovative development in innovation ecosystems; (3) the organisational models and factors influencing a company’s capacity to establish successful partnerships with universities and to develop entrepreneurial and innovative capabilities; and (4) the approaches, models, and tools that can support universities and companies to design, implement, and assess partnerships and initiatives aimed to develop entrepreneurial and innovative capabilities. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Efficiency Analysis of the Royalty System from the Perspective of Open Innovation
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(3), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4030022
Received: 4 June 2018 / Revised: 15 June 2018 / Accepted: 15 June 2018 / Published: 22 June 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (299 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to suggest efficiency improvement using the analysis of the efficiency of the royalty system for government-funded research institutes (GRIs) belonging to the National Research Council of Science & Technology (NST). Twenty three GRIs’ royalty incomes and expenses
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The purpose of this study is to suggest efficiency improvement using the analysis of the efficiency of the royalty system for government-funded research institutes (GRIs) belonging to the National Research Council of Science & Technology (NST). Twenty three GRIs’ royalty incomes and expenses (2013–2015) were analyzed using the data envelopment analysis (DEA) model. First, Research Model 1 was used to find out if the obligated expense category’s distribution ratio were efficient. Five Charnes, Cooper and Rhodes (CCR) model organizations and 14 Banker, Charnes and Cooper (BCC) model organizations demonstrated 100% efficiency. With the exception of the obligated expense category, Research Model 2 was used. Seventeen CCR model organizations and 18 BCC model organizations demonstrated 100% efficiency. GRIs were divided into efficient and inefficient organizations using each model, and potential improvements and benchmarking decision-making units (DMUs) were found for inefficient organizations. Second, multiple regression analysis in Research Model 2 was used to analyze the cause of the efficiency to find factors that influenced the transfer of technology and license improvement. Third, there were efficiency differences among research organizations as a result of the efficiency analysis considering the research organization type with respect to the constant returns to scale (CRS) efficiency of Research Models 1 and 2. Thus, different policies should be applied to improve the efficiency. Finally, the possible improvements, future directions and limits of this study are discussed. Full article
Open AccessArticle How to Respond to the Fourth Industrial Revolution, or the Second Information Technology Revolution? Dynamic New Combinations between Technology, Market, and Society through Open Innovation
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(3), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4030021
Received: 3 April 2018 / Revised: 28 May 2018 / Accepted: 4 June 2018 / Published: 21 June 2018
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (2575 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Since Klaus Schwab and the World Economic Forum declared the arrival of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, there has been much discussion about it. However, there is no commonly agreed-upon definition of the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Therefore, we attempted to answer the following four
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Since Klaus Schwab and the World Economic Forum declared the arrival of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, there has been much discussion about it. However, there is no commonly agreed-upon definition of the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Therefore, we attempted to answer the following four research questions. “What is the definition of the Fourth Industrial Revolution?”, “How can we respond to the Fourth Industrial Revolution in terms of institutions?”, “How can we respond to the Fourth Industrial Revolution in terms of technology?”, “How can we respond to the Fourth Industrial Revolution in terms of firm innovation and start-up strategy?” Brainstorming was conducted by 11 scholars from several countries to answer these four research questions. Therefore, this research is not the end product of four research questions, but a kind of advanced template to answer the four research questions for continuing research. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Competitive Advantage and Its Impact on New Product Development Strategy (Case Study: Toos Nirro Technical Firm)
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(2), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4020017
Received: 18 April 2018 / Revised: 7 May 2018 / Accepted: 8 May 2018 / Published: 26 May 2018
PDF Full-text (1620 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Although new product development and its importance for companies as a new approach is accompanied by risks, identification of competitive advantage factors can be helpful for managers in reduction of decision-making risks. The Toos Nirro technical firm is a leading company in meeting
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Although new product development and its importance for companies as a new approach is accompanied by risks, identification of competitive advantage factors can be helpful for managers in reduction of decision-making risks. The Toos Nirro technical firm is a leading company in meeting the demands of its industry in Iran as it is one of the most effective manufacturing centers in Iran, which is committed to complying with modern standards and taking advantage of the latest scientific achievements and transfer of technology. The statistical population included experts and top managers at the Toos Niroo technical firm. The present study was conducted to identify and rate competitive advantage factors in new product development in the Toos Niroo technical firm. In addition to identification of the factors, they were also rated to reveal which factor ranked the high in new product development. This was an applied research which was carried out by a descriptive survey methodology. Using the Cochran method, a sample of 50 people was adopted and data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS software (p < 0.15). Hypotheses were tested with the Kolmogorov–Smirnov and parametric tests. Results indicated that competitive advantage factors including quality, efficiency, innovation, and accountability were positively and significantly related to new product development. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Synergy in Knowledge-Based Innovation Systems at National and Regional Levels: The Triple-Helix Model and the Fourth Industrial Revolution
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(2), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4020016
Received: 19 April 2018 / Revised: 1 May 2018 / Accepted: 4 May 2018 / Published: 16 May 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2046 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Unlike national systems of innovation, a knowledge-based economy is grounded in the volatility of discursive knowledge enabling us to specify expectations. Expectations can be improved by testing them against observations. Furthermore, expectations can be codified in different ways; for example, in terms of
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Unlike national systems of innovation, a knowledge-based economy is grounded in the volatility of discursive knowledge enabling us to specify expectations. Expectations can be improved by testing them against observations. Furthermore, expectations can be codified in different ways; for example, in terms of market perspectives or technological opportunities. The Fourth Industrial Revolution entails a transition to the reflexive entertaining of expectations in terms of models as increasingly the sources of innovations. The Triple-Helix synergy indicator enables us to use institutional arrangements as instantiations of the knowledge dynamics and thus to assess the generation of options and the reduction of uncertainty in information-theoretical terms. Using this indicator, one can assess empirically—in terms of negative bits of information; that is, redundancy—in which innovation systems and to what extent a technological revolution is taking place. Full article
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Other

Jump to: Research

Open AccessConcept Paper Innovation through Coopetition: Future Directions and New Challenges
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(4), 47; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4040047
Received: 11 September 2018 / Revised: 17 September 2018 / Accepted: 18 September 2018 / Published: 2 October 2018
PDF Full-text (1264 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The paper focuses on the topic of the relationship between coopetition and innovation as well as on their impact on competitive advantage. Before getting to the central issue, a literature review on the topic of coopetition is carried out, in order to catch
[...] Read more.
The paper focuses on the topic of the relationship between coopetition and innovation as well as on their impact on competitive advantage. Before getting to the central issue, a literature review on the topic of coopetition is carried out, in order to catch the existing gaps as well as to single out the paths for future development on the topic. Starting with a bibliometric analysis, the research then focuses on the contents of the contemporary literature, analyzing the main approaches internationally developed. The hint is to study the relationship between innovation and coopetition (in terms of antecedents) and then the impact of innovation-based coopetition or of coopetition-based innovation on firm performance. Full article
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Open AccessCase Report A Study on the Effectiveness of Entrepreneurship Education Programs in Higher Education Institutions: A Case Study of Korean Graduate Programs
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2018, 4(3), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc4030026
Received: 10 June 2018 / Revised: 23 June 2018 / Accepted: 25 June 2018 / Published: 28 June 2018
PDF Full-text (1672 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to verify the effectiveness of the entrepreneurship curriculum and the educational program recognized by students and graduates. This paper has studied the improvement of curriculum and educational programs operated by the Graduate School of Entrepreneurship by using
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The purpose of this study is to verify the effectiveness of the entrepreneurship curriculum and the educational program recognized by students and graduates. This paper has studied the improvement of curriculum and educational programs operated by the Graduate School of Entrepreneurship by using Importance-Performance Analysis (IPA). This study was conducted on students and graduates who attended entrepreneurship graduate schools designated by the Ministry of SMEs and Startups (MSS) in Korea. The results of the questionnaire survey were tested the differences of curriculum courses by paired-sample t test and its improvement was analyzed through Importance-Performance Analysis (IPA). According to the research analysis, there was a difference in the preference of the curriculum and the educational program recognized by graduate students and graduates. The results of this study suggested academic and practical implications. In academic terms, this study classified the subject and educational curriculums of entrepreneurship graduate programs through the analysis of importance-satisfaction. In practical terms, this study suggested implications for the improvement of curriculum and educational programs for the activation of entrepreneurship graduate schools. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Keynotes

Title:
An Era of Open Innovation in the 4th Industrial Revolution
Author: SangHyuk Son


Title:
Global Trends, New Research Avenues and Methodologies
Author: Levent Altinay

Title
: Knowledge Exchange in Innovation Networks and Innovation Policy for Networks – An Example of Policy Informatics
Author
: Andreas Pyka

Title
: Innovation through competition. Future directions and new challenges
Author: Valentina Della Corte

Title: Fourth Industrial Revolution and Disruptive Innovation: Implications for Emerging Economies
Author: Venni V Krishna

Title
: How to Respond to the 4th Industrial Revolution, or the 2nd IT Revolution? Dynamics New Combination Between Technology, and Market or Society Through Open Innovation
Author: JinHyo Joseph Yun et al.

Title
: Innovations Labs for Entrepreneurship and Company Value Creation
Author: Giovanni Schiuma

Title
: Managing Creative Accumulation: How do Some Japanese Companies Navigate Persistency?
Author: Fumio Kodama

Title
: Synergy in the Knowledge Base of Innovation Systems at National and Regional Levels: Interactions among Phenotypical Variation and Genotypical Selection Mechanisms
Author: Loet Leydesdorff

Regular Papers


Title:
Education and Entrepreneurship. Mapping the Territory Towards an Action Plan
Authors:
Luca Ferri; Gianluca Ginesti; Rosanna Spanò; Annamaria Zampella;
Affiliations:
Department of Economics, Management, Institutions - University of Naples Federico II, Italy
E-Mails:
[email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]

Title: Open- and Closed- Innovation in a System Thinking Perspective: A Systematic Review
Authors:
Mario Tani 1; Ornella Papaluca 1; Pasquale Sasso 2
Affiliations:
1 Department of Economics, Management, Institutions, University of Naples Federico II, Italy; 2 Department of Economics, Università degli Studi della Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Italy
E-Mails:
[email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]

Title: Developing a New R&D Technology Financing Model with Crowd Funding
Authors:
Seongpyo Hong; Donghoon Oh
E-Mails:
[email protected]; [email protected]

Title:
The Impact of Foreign Direct Investment on the Development of Manufacturing Sector: the Case of Latvia
Authors:
Salome Gvatua; Natalja Lace; Konstantins Kozlovskis
Affiliations:
Riga Technical University, Riga, Latvia
E-Mails:
[email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]

Title: How Innovation Conditions the Search for External Knowledge: A Study of Nigerian Firms
Author:
Abiodun Egbetokun
Affiliation:
National Centre for Technology Management, PMB 012, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria

Title: International Davison of Innovative Labor and Technological Alliances
Author:
Yuri Sadoi
Affiliation:
Meijo University, Japan
E-Mail:
[email protected]

Title:
Organizational Learning for Innovativeness: A Systematic Review
Author:
Yoshi Takahashi
Affiliation:
Hiroshima University, Japan

Title:
Entrepreneurial Business Model Development Strategies for Smart Technology Products
Authors:
Min-Ren Yan 1; Hsiang-Mei Chen 2
Affiliations:
1 Institute of International Business Administration at Chinese Culture University, Taiwan; 2 Chinese Culture University, Taiwan
E-Mails:
[email protected]; [email protected]
Title:
Towards the Innovation Ecosystem of Fashion Technology Business Model Development: An Empirical Study
Authors:
Min-Ren Yan 1; Chia-Chi Hsu 2
Affiliations:
1 Institute of International Business Administration at Chinese Culture University, Taiwan; 2 Chinese Culture University, Taiwan
E-Mails:
[email protected]; [email protected]

Title:
Construction and Application of Regional Entrepreneurial Ecosystem Evaluation Index: Evidence from Zhejiang Province Of China
Author:
Guopeng Xiang
Affiliation:
School of Business Administration , Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310018, China
E-Mail:
[email protected]

Title:
Research on the Industrial Policy of Electric Vehicle Based On The Innovation Theory of Demand Side: Taking Shenzhen New Energy Vehicle Industry as an Example
Author:
Lu Qu
E-Mail:
[email protected]

Title: A Study on the Innovation Policies of Changzhou High-Tech Zone from The Perspective Of Stakeholders
Authors:
Yue Zhu; Tao Lee
Affiliations:
Centre for Innovation and Development, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, China
E-Mails: [email protected]; [email protected]

Title:
Analysis on Situation and Problems of the Internet Transportation Ecosystem in China:Based On The Perspective Of Innovation Ecology
Authors:
Lei.Ma; Tao.Lee
Affiliations:
School of Intellectual property, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, China
E-Mails: [email protected]; [email protected]

Title: Sustainable Production Scheduling Under Fourth Industrial Revolution
Authors:
Sang-Oh Shim 1; KyungBae Park 2; SungYong Choi 3; Jin-Min Kim 4
Affiliations:
1 Department of Business Administration and Accounting, Hanbat National University, Korea; 2 Department of Business Administration, Sangji University, Korea; 3 Division of Business Administration, Yonsei University, Korea; 4 College of Global Business, Korea University Sejong Campus, Korea
E-Mails:
[email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]

Title: How to Respond To the Fourth Industrial Revolution, or The Second IT Revolution? Dynamic New Combination between Technology, and Market Or Society Through Open Innovation
Authors:
JinHyo Joseph Yun; Andreas Pyka; Giovanni Schiuma; Fumio Kodama; Min-Ren Yan; KyungBae Park; MinHwa Lee; HangSik Park; DongKyu Won; KwangHo Jung; SamYoul Lee; Xiaofei Zhao; JungHwan Jun
E-Mails:
[email protected]

Title: A Study on Factors Affecting University-Industry Collaboration
Authors:
Gyeong Min Nam 1; Dae Geon Kim 2; Sang Ok Choi 3
Affiliations:
1 NRF of Korea, Korea; 2 Dongseo University, Korea; 3 Korea University, Korea
E-Mails:
[email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]

Title: Construction Market Response Measures in Accordance with the Changes in Population Structure
Authors:
Dae Geon Kim 1; Seung Hoo Jin 2; Sang Ok Choi 3
Affiliations:
1 Dongseo University, Korea; 2 Samsung SDS, Seoul, Korea, Korean; 3 Korea University, Korea
E-Mails:
[email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]

Title: Study of the Factors Affecting Decrease in the Government Corruption and the Mediating Effects of E-governments—A Cross-country Analysis
Authors:
Kangwon Lee; Sang Ok Choi
Affiliations:
Department of Science and Technology Studies, Korea University, Korea
E-Mails: [email protected]; [email protected]

Title: Science and Technology Policy and ANT in the Fourth Industrial Revolution Era
Authors:
Boong Kee Choi; DongKyu Won
Affiliations:
Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information, Korea


Title:
The Linkage Effect and Efficiency Analysis in the Field of Precision Medicine
Authors:
BangRae Lee; EunSoo Son; DongKyu Won; WoonDong Yeo; KwangHoon Kim; SangGook Kim
Affiliations:
Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information, Korea
E-Mails: [email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]

Title: Open Innovation Design Process Model Building for Teenagers in the 4th Industrial Revolution
Authors:
Kyungah Lee 1; Jiyoun Lee 2
Affiliations:
1 Korea National University of Transportation, Korea; 2 IDAS, Hongik University, Korea
E-Mails:
[email protected]; [email protected]

Title: Prototyping Stakeholders in Public Dementia Care Service of the Dementia Cafe in Seongju District through Service Design Approaches
Author:
Taesun Kim
Affiliation:
Kyung Il University, Korea
E-Mail:
[email protected]

Title: A New Pathway Project for Maker Education with Information-theoretic Approach
Authors:
Donghwa Jeong; Seungju Lee
E-Mails:
[email protected]

Title: WISH (Well-aging Indexing for Senior Health) Platform towards Happiness
Author:
Park Hang Sik
E-Mail:
[email protected]

Title: Analysis of the Effect of Home Energy Management System
Authors:
EungSuk Park; SooHyun Park; Boram Kim; DaeCheol Kim
Affiliations:
Hanyang University, Seoul 04763, Korea
E-Mails: [email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]

Title: Efficiency Analysis of Innovative SMEs
Authors:
Boram Kim; Soo-Hyun Park; Eung-Suk Park; Daecheol Kim
Affiliations:
Hanyang University Graduate School, Korea
E-Mails:
[email protected]

Title: Does Institutional Investor Affect CSR Performance? From Perspective of Social Network
Authors:
Lujun Qi 1; Wei’an Li 2; Lixiang Wang 3
Affiliations:
1 Business School, Tianjin University of Finance and Economics, Tianjin, China; 2 China Academy of Corporate Governance, Nankai University, Tianjin, China; 3 Business School, Nankai University, Tianjin, China
E-Mails:
[email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]

Title: Framing Open Innovation in start-ups’ incubators: A Complexity Theory perspective
Authors:
Cinzia Battistella 1; Alberto F. De Toni 2; Elena Pessot 2
Affiliations:
1 University of Siena, Italy; 2 University of Udine, Italy
E-Mails: [email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]

Title: Slap or Clap? The Impact of Media Coverage on Controversial Governance Practices
Authors:
Wu Chao 1; Lv Rongjie 1; Xue Youzhi 2
Affiliations:
1 School of Economics and Management, Hebei University of Technology, China; 2 China Academy of Corporate Governance/Business School, Nankai University, China
E-Mails:
[email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]

Title: Open Innovation in Healthcare: Capturing the Value of Patient Innovation
Authors:
Camilla Santu 1; Leid Zejnilovic 2; Emanuele Lettieri 1
Affiliations:
1 Politecnico di Milano, Italy; 2 Nova School of Business and Economics, Portugal
E-Mails: [email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]

Title: Developing and evaluating determinants of licensing price in biopharmaceutical industry
Authors:
Jeong Hee Lee 1; Tae-Eung Sung 2; Eungdo Kim 1
Affiliations:
1 Researcher, Graduate School of Health Science Business Convergence, College of Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Korea; 2 Principal Researcher, Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information (KISTI), Korea
E-Mails:
[email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]

Title:
How Measure Efficiency of the Pharmaceutical Industry Based on Open Innovation Practices
Authors:
Kisoon Shin 1,2; Eungdo Kim 2
Affiliations:
1 Korea national institute of health, Korea; 2 School of Health Science Business Convergence, College of Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Korea
E-Mails:
[email protected]; trlfightin[email protected]

Title: Comparisons of Open Innovation Efficient between Korean Pharmaceuticals Industry and Automobile Industry
Authors:
Euiseob Jeong; Sangwoo Kim
Affiliations:
Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information (KISTI), Korea
E-Mails: [email protected]; [email protected]

Title: What are Determinants of Successful Technological Innovation?
Authors:
Junghyun Yoon 1; Kikeun Kim 2; Sanghyun Sung 3
Affiliations:
1 Dongguk University-Gyeongju, Korea; 2 Gumi University, Korea; 3 POSTECH, Korea
E-Mails:
[email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]

Title: Entrepreneurial Business Process Repository
Authors:
Yoonseon Jeong 1; Sanghyun Sung 2; Injun Choi 1
Affiliations:
1 Department of Industrial and Management Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Korea; 2 POSTECH Entrepreneurship Center; Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Korea;
E-Mails: [email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]

Title: Technology Transfer and Commercialization with a Focus on Employment Change
Author:
Junghee Han
Affiliation:
Graduate School of Smart City Science Management, Hongik University

Room 306-2, Sejoung-roJochiwon, Sejong, Korea
E-Mail:
[email protected] hongik.ac.kr

Title: Change of Butterfly Distribution Pattern in Response to Climate Change in the Korean Peninsula
Authors:
Hye-young Jeon; Sang Don Lee
Affiliations:
Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Ewha Womans University, Korea
E-Mails:
[email protected]

Title: The Relationship between Technology Innovation and Startup Performance: Employment and Profit Perspective
Authors:
Daesoo Choi; Chang Soo Sung

Title: A Meta Analysis of Fashion Technology and Open Innovation
Authors:
Seung-Hee Lee 1; Jane Workman 1; Kwangho Jung 2
Affiliations:
1 Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL, USA; 2 Seoul National University, Korea

Title: Socio-economic Benefit of Dynamic Colleague-based Carpool Service in Korea
Authors:
Myungsik Do; Hoyong Jung
Affiliations:
Center of Infrastructure Asset Management, Hanbat National University, Korea
E-Mails:
[email protected]; [email protected]

Title: A Study on the Impact of R&D Investment on Organizational Performance: Evidence from South Korea
Authors:
Hun Park; Jae Young Yoo; Hyuk Hahn
Affiliations:
Division of SMEs Innovation, Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information, Seoul, Korea
E-Mails:
[email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]

Title: Development of a Supporting Model for External Environment Analysis by Text Mining; The Case of Korea
Authors:
Ji-Hui Kim; Hyoung Sun Yoo; Jinhan Park
Affiliations:
Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information, Korea
E-Mails: [email protected]; [email protected](or [email protected]); [email protected]

Title: National S&T Standard Classification System as a Measure of Innovation: How Will it Reflect Innovation?
Author:
Jiyeon Ryu
Affiliation:
Korea Institute of Science and Technology Evaluation and Planning, Korea
E-Mail:
[email protected]

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