Special Issue "Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity"

A special issue of Journal of Open Innovation: Technology, Market, and Complexity (ISSN 2199-8531).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. JinHyo Joseph Yun *
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
DGIST (Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology), 333, Techno jungang-daero, Hyeonpung-eup, Dalseong-gun, Daegu, Korea
Interests: open innovation; business model; open innovation economy; social open innovation; Schumpeterian dynamics; complexity; game theory; political economics
* Managing Guest Editors.
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. JongIn Choi
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Industry-University Cooperation Foundation, Hanbat National University, 125 Dongseo-daero, Deogmyeong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 34158, Korea
Interests: technology management; entrepreneurship; creativity and innovation cluster

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will publish some selected papers from the annual conference of SOItmC 2020. Suitable topics include but are not limited to:

  • Dynamics open innovation;
  • Business models;
  • Open innovation engineering;
  • Open innovation of electronics;
  • Schumpeterian economics;
  • Artificial intelligence;
  • Block chains;
  • Smart cities;
  • Sharing economy;
  • Complexity;
  • Smart wearable technology;
  • Machine intelligence in mechatronics and robotics;
  • The impact of fire protection and safety technologies;
  • Construction education;
  • Innovation diversity for emerging economies;
  • Digital innovation and governance policy;
  • Open innovation—the role of Japan;
  • Quantum management, Oriental wisdom, and management innovation;
  • The 4th Industrial Revolution—a sustainable innovation;
  • Dynamics of open innovation in the biomedical industry;
  • Open innovation and technology commercialization;
  • Technology, innovation, and collaborative governance;
  • Innovation performance;
  • Knowledge transfer and convergence identification with intellectual property strategy;
  • The roles of HR, organizational capabilities, and open innovation in the 4th Industrial Revolution;
  • Innovation, entrepreneurship, and sustainability;
  • Digital transformation and innovation in the public sector;
  • Green governance;
  • Digital innovation and entrepreneurship;
  • Industry innovation ecosystem design and strategic development;
  • Open innovation and strategic competitiveness;
  • Measuring business excellence and case studies for sustainability;
  • Patent analysis and open innovation;
  • Innovation ecosystem for sustainable development in China;
  • Beyond innovation, beyond smart cities;
  • Entrepreneurship and technology-based firms;
  • Climate change and enhancement of public awareness toward industry;
  • Stories about the Korean innovation companies from start-ups and ventures to medium-large enterprises;
  • Transdisciplinary research and education in the deep-net age;
  • Open innovation in the tourism sector;
  • Efficiency issues in R&D and supply chain;
  • Open innovation study of the University of South Wales Business School;
  • Open innovation with inter-rationality;
  • Design, community innovation, creativity, and culture;
  • Innovation and knowledge creation.

Time schedule of this Special Issue:

  • Special issue Open: 10 June 2020

Any SOItmC 2020 authors in addition to the planned papers can submit to this Special Issue after full paper submission to the SOItmC 2020 platform and paying the registration fee as of 10 June 2020.

  • Close: 31 December 2020

All papers should be submitted to this Special Issue by 31 December 2020.

  • SOItmC 2020 best paper recommendation condition

The best paper award of SOItmC 2020 will be chosen from papers which were selected for the Special Issue of JOItmC for SOItmC 2020, and submitted at the JOItmC until 1 July 2020.

  • SOItmC 2020 keynote papers

The Article Processing Charges (APC) of the keynote speech papers of SOItmC 2020 will be supported by SOItmC if the paper passes the regular review process. The authors of these papers should include an acknowledgement section following the example below:

Acknowledgement: This paper was presented as a keynote speech of SOItmC 2020, and the publishing fee was supported by SOItmC.

Prof. Dr. JinHyo Joseph Yun
Prof. Dr. JongIn Choi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Open Innovation: Technology, Market, and Complexity is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (31 papers)

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Research

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Article
Changes and Challenges in Museum Management after the COVID-19 Pandemic
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2021, 7(2), 148; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc7020148 - 04 Jun 2021
Viewed by 791
Abstract
To investigate how museums will change after the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, and to seek opinions on how well they can secure sustainable competitiveness, this study conducted 15 in-depth interviews using snowball sampling. The interviewees consisted of: an artists’ group, a museum-related [...] Read more.
To investigate how museums will change after the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, and to seek opinions on how well they can secure sustainable competitiveness, this study conducted 15 in-depth interviews using snowball sampling. The interviewees consisted of: an artists’ group, a museum-related group, and a users’ group. Our findings revealed that museums are working hard to gain competitiveness in the face of COVID-19, for which they changed their existing business models to a great extent. One of the most significant changes they introduced, was considering their users as internal, rather than external, stakeholders. For promoting museum products, encouraging users to participate makes them strong supporters who are more active across online platforms and engage and motivate new users, thereby configuring the network effects. The study concludes that this innovative trend will contribute to museums’ sustainable competitiveness during the pandemic as well as in the post-pandemic era. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
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Article
Patent Value and Survival of Patents
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2021, 7(2), 119; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc7020119 - 26 Apr 2021
Viewed by 526
Abstract
This study investigated the effect of patent value on the renewal (survival) of patents. The private value of patents can be one of the main pillars sustaining a firm’s value, and the estimation of the value may contribute to the strategic management of [...] Read more.
This study investigated the effect of patent value on the renewal (survival) of patents. The private value of patents can be one of the main pillars sustaining a firm’s value, and the estimation of the value may contribute to the strategic management of firms. The current study aimed to confirm the recent research findings with survival analysis, focusing on the more homogeneous patent data samples. In this study, a dataset is constructed from a cohort of 6646 patents from the 1996 and 1997 application years, using patent data from the European Patent Office (EPO). We found that the family size and non-patent backward citations exhibited profound impacts on patent survival. This result is in line with numerous studies, indicating the positive impact of science linkages in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical fields. It was also found that the effect of the ex-post indicator is not as strong as the ex-ante indicators, like traditional family size and backward citations. In short, the family size matters most for the survival of patents, according to the current research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
Article
Multidexterity—A New Metaphor for Open Innovation
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2021, 7(1), 99; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc7010099 - 16 Mar 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 992
Abstract
Open innovation will have an important role to play in recovering from the aftermath of the coronavirus and it has already made a crucial contribution. The prism of COVID-19 (“COVID” hereafter) has made more vivid both the complexity and unpredictability of managing innovation. [...] Read more.
Open innovation will have an important role to play in recovering from the aftermath of the coronavirus and it has already made a crucial contribution. The prism of COVID-19 (“COVID” hereafter) has made more vivid both the complexity and unpredictability of managing innovation. This article considers why today’s open, intrinsically unpredictable business environments require updated theories for managing innovation. Concept formation lies at the heart of all social science progress and in this paper, we propose a new concept to accurately reflect the turbulence and complexity of managing open innovation in a post-COVID world. We argue that the innovator’s dilemma—a still influential argument that suggests exploiting current resources necessarily reduces the likelihood of successful exploration for new resources—is an increasingly problematic theoretic anchor. Furthermore, the prescription based on this line of thinking that organizational leaders should foster ambidextrous capabilities is increasingly suspect as leadership is more broadly shared and organizational processes become less easily dichotomized and controllable. We argue that the operating context for organizations is now so complex and ambiguous that it is time to revisit and revise the widely accepted concept of “ambidexterity” and we describe the updated and expanded construct as Multidexterity. “Multidexterity” is the organizational ability to simultaneously carry out multiple search and selection activities based on diverse strategic logics and levels of knowledge to generate a portfolio of innovative outcomes. We describe a number of case studies of extreme and unique collaboration to underpin our revised concept. Our paper reveals the advantages of the updated view, outlining the fresh insights it can generate. We conclude by setting out an agenda for future research and suggesting that joint empirical research by academics and practitioners is needed to further develop this approach to innovation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
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Article
The Effect of Healthcare Data Analytics Training on Knowledge Management: A Quasi-Experimental Field Study
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2021, 7(1), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc7010060 - 07 Feb 2021
Viewed by 620
Abstract
This study aims to provide practice-oriented evidence regarding the implementation of healthcare data analytics and its impact on the use of new data analytics tools and relevant analytical skills improvement. A quasi-experimental pre-test/post-test controlled study was conducted in a large medical system in [...] Read more.
This study aims to provide practice-oriented evidence regarding the implementation of healthcare data analytics and its impact on the use of new data analytics tools and relevant analytical skills improvement. A quasi-experimental pre-test/post-test controlled study was conducted in a large medical system in the eastern United States. Healthcare data analytics training program participants (N = 21) and a comparison group comprising trainee-identified peers completing comparable work (N = 27) were compared at the start of training and one year later. Results showed that both trainees and peers demonstrated improved healthcare data analytics skills over time, related to concomitant increases in their healthcare data analytics-related learning and performance goals. This study suggests that healthcare organizations aiming at successfully implementing a new data analytics infrastructure should provide well-designed training that enables trainees to develop specific learning and performance goals as well as improve relevant skills and ability to use new tools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
Article
What Is Important for the Growth of Latecomers in the Medical Device Industry?
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2021, 7(1), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc7010013 - 05 Jan 2021
Viewed by 543
Abstract
In the medical device industry, which is highly value-added and requires multidisciplinary knowledge, major global firms dominate the market, so it is necessary to establish a growth strategy suitable for latecomers. Through a Korean case, it was confirmed that import, diversification, and R&D [...] Read more.
In the medical device industry, which is highly value-added and requires multidisciplinary knowledge, major global firms dominate the market, so it is necessary to establish a growth strategy suitable for latecomers. Through a Korean case, it was confirmed that import, diversification, and R&D activity are distinguishing strategies. The existing literature covers these strategies, but these findings are fragmented and differ from those of latecomers. This study examined the impact of the above factors on corporate growth, based on data of 440 Korean medical device manufacturers from 2011 to 2016. According to the results of panel data regression, diversification and R&D activity have a positive effect on the financial performance of a firm, while the import business model shows a negative effect. These results are expected to provide implications with respect to strategies for the growth of latecomers in the medical device industry. In future research, it is necessary to investigate how detailed strategies in accordance with the growth stages of a firm can be established. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
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Article
Achieving Ambidexterity in Internationalization: Analysis of How SMEs Cope with Tensions between Organizational Agility–Efficiency
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2020, 6(4), 188; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc6040188 - 12 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 780
Abstract
This study aims to examine how small and medium enterprises manage the tensions between organizational agility and efficiency. Organizational agility is a multidimensional concept where each of its components can interact differently with efficiency. The tensions between other capabilities have been explored in [...] Read more.
This study aims to examine how small and medium enterprises manage the tensions between organizational agility and efficiency. Organizational agility is a multidimensional concept where each of its components can interact differently with efficiency. The tensions between other capabilities have been explored in many previous studies, yet there is a lack of research exploring the roots of the tensions between organizational agility and efficiency, how the actors interpret these tensions and what dimensions of organizational agility are causing the tensions. A multiple case study research design with an inductive approach was used to explore how two SMEs manage the tensions between organizational agility and efficiency to serve customers from abroad. Despite the relationship between the agility and efficiency seeming contradictory, our analysis demonstrated that the interaction between the two concepts is complex, depending on the object of the tensions, the actors involved and the context. In fact, two actors at the same level of the organizational hierarchy can have identical perceptions about a tension, but they can arise from different logical reasoning. Moreover, due to the multidimensionality of organizational agility, a meta-capability of organizational agility is more likely to dominate the interaction with efficiency. This study contributes to the limited empirical evidence on how actors in SMEs perceive and manage the various tensions emerging from organizational agility and efficiency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
Article
Citizen Innovation: Exploring the Responsibility Governance and Cooperative Mode of a “Post-Schumpeter” Paradigm
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2020, 6(4), 172; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc6040172 - 01 Dec 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 657
Abstract
It has become a burgeoning trend for the innovation paradigm to shift from producer-dominant to non-producer centric. Based on a critical review of the non-producer innovation literature, we identified several limitations of existing non-producer innovation paradigms—grassroots innovation, free innovation, common innovation, and social [...] Read more.
It has become a burgeoning trend for the innovation paradigm to shift from producer-dominant to non-producer centric. Based on a critical review of the non-producer innovation literature, we identified several limitations of existing non-producer innovation paradigms—grassroots innovation, free innovation, common innovation, and social innovation—along two critical dimensions: responsibility governance of innovation outcomes and effective organizing form for collaborative innovation. To address the theoretical gaps in existing non-producer innovation research, we propose citizen innovation (CI) as a new integrated innovation paradigm to balance these two dimensions by focusing on citizens’ unique role as innovators. In the paper, we discuss CI’s theoretical framework from three aspects: (1) citizen participation in innovation; (2) open collaborative innovation as the organizing form; (3) the process and incentive mechanisms of citizen innovation. We also offer two real-world examples to support the main propositions and mechanisms of CI. To conclude, we reflect on the limitations of the current research and discuss future directions for CI research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
Article
Absorptive Routines and the Economic Impact of Incremental Innovations: Developing Continuous Improvement Strategies
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2020, 6(4), 167; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc6040167 - 26 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 750
Abstract
The important influence that incremental innovation has, both on the organization’s results and on the development of disruptive innovations in a synergistic relationship of positive sum, makes it necessary to deepen its study. In the context of absorptive capacity, this paper aims to [...] Read more.
The important influence that incremental innovation has, both on the organization’s results and on the development of disruptive innovations in a synergistic relationship of positive sum, makes it necessary to deepen its study. In the context of absorptive capacity, this paper aims to contribute to the construction of a specific model of routines for more efficient exploitation. The empirical study was carried out in a sample of Spanish manufacturing companies of the PITEC Panel. The results show the superiority of the market as a source of knowledge compared to other sources with more complex knowledge, but not adjusted to the needs of a minor improvement. In addition, the management of external knowledge is a process whose phases are interrelated, so the routines and resources used must contribute to enriching the external knowledge previously acquired and not be redundant. Therefore, that would mean an inefficient allocation of resources for obtaining and exploiting continuous innovation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
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Article
The Wine Influencers: Exploring a New Communication Model of Open Innovation for Wine Producers—A Netnographic, Factor and AGIL Analysis
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2020, 6(4), 165; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc6040165 - 26 Nov 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 837
Abstract
Wine Influencers (WIs) represent a new type of independent third party endorsers that are progressively establishing themselves within social networks. This study analyzes the characteristics of the activity of WIs and the communication model used via Instagram. Netnographic Analysis, Factor Analysis and AGIL [...] Read more.
Wine Influencers (WIs) represent a new type of independent third party endorsers that are progressively establishing themselves within social networks. This study analyzes the characteristics of the activity of WIs and the communication model used via Instagram. Netnographic Analysis, Factor Analysis and AGIL methods were applied. The results show five Key-findings within specific relationships established during discussions: advice from Wine Influencers and generalized reciprocity in relationships; structural and social bonds established based on the frequency of messages from regular followers; peer-to-peer relationship development through recommendation; development of trust established through online relationships; wine influencer’s influence on followers regarding everything about the wine. The study derives a model that explains the communication dimensions used by WIs that are: advertising (information about product/brand) (35.71%); persuasion—added value to brand and product (42.62%); brand democratization (10.07%); and identity (8.03%). This study provides a novel contribution to the open innovation process of small and medium-sized wine industries for their marketing strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
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Article
Economic Granularity Interval in Decision Tree Algorithm Standardization from an Open Innovation Perspective: Towards a Platform for Sustainable Matching
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2020, 6(4), 149; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc6040149 - 16 Nov 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 611
Abstract
In the context of the application of artificial intelligence in an intellectual property trading platform, the number of demanders and suppliers that exchange scarce resources is growing continuously. Improvement of computational power promotes matching efficiency significantly. It is necessary to greatly reduce energy [...] Read more.
In the context of the application of artificial intelligence in an intellectual property trading platform, the number of demanders and suppliers that exchange scarce resources is growing continuously. Improvement of computational power promotes matching efficiency significantly. It is necessary to greatly reduce energy consumption in order to realize the machine learning process in terminals and microprocessors in edge computing (smart phones, wearable devices, automobiles, IoT devices, etc.) and reduce the resource burden of data centers. Machine learning algorithms generated in an open community lack standardization in practice, and hence require open innovation participation to reduce computing cost, shorten algorithm running time, and improve human-machine collaborative competitiveness. The purpose of this study was to find an economic range of the granularity in a decision tree, a popular machine learning algorithm. This work addresses the research questions of what the economic tree depth interval is and what the corresponding time cost is with increasing granularity given the number of matches. This study also aimed to balance the efficiency and cost via simulation. Results show that the benefit of decreasing the tree search depth brought by the increased evaluation granularity is not linear, which means that, in a given number of candidate matches, the granularity has a definite and relatively economical range. The selection of specific evaluation granularity in this range can obtain a smaller tree depth and avoid the occurrence of low efficiency, which is the excessive increase in the time cost. Hence, the standardization of an AI algorithm is applicable to edge computing scenarios, such as an intellectual property trading platform. The economic granularity interval can not only save computing resource costs but also save AI decision-making time and avoid human decision-maker time cost. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
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Article
How Do Face Consciousness and Public Self-Consciousness Affect Consumer Decision-Making?
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2020, 6(4), 144; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc6040144 - 12 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 599
Abstract
Many individual differences affect consumers in the decision-making process (i.e., what to purchase; when to purchase). Face consciousness and public self-consciousness affect when in the fashion life cycle consumers decide to purchase, as well as what to purchase. Both face consciousness and public [...] Read more.
Many individual differences affect consumers in the decision-making process (i.e., what to purchase; when to purchase). Face consciousness and public self-consciousness affect when in the fashion life cycle consumers decide to purchase, as well as what to purchase. Both face consciousness and public self-consciousness are concerned with consciousness (i.e., awareness; mindfulness) and both depend on social comparison processes. But the motivation underlying the social comparisons is different: with face consciousness, social comparisons yield appraisals of prestige and social status; with public self-consciousness, social comparisons yield assessments of situational appropriateness. The purpose of this study was to examine links among face consciousness; public self-consciousness; brand prestige; self-expressive brand (inner; social), and fashion leadership. Participants were 221 university students who completed a questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, Cronbach’s alpha reliability, and multivariate/univariate analysis of variance (M/ANOVA) were conducted to analyze data. Results showed that face consciousness and public self-consciousness similarly affected ratings of the social self-expressive brand. However, face consciousness (but not public self-consciousness) influenced ratings of brand prestige and inner self-expressive brand. Public self-consciousness (but not face consciousness) influenced fashion leadership. Thus, while face consciousness and public self-consciousness are both concerned with consciousness, they independently influence consumer decision-making in different ways. Theoretical and practical implications are provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
Article
Determinants of Innovation Ecosystem in Underdeveloped Areas—Take Nanning High-Tech Zone in Western China as an Example
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2020, 6(4), 135; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc6040135 - 06 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 657
Abstract
High-tech zones are an important platform for local governments in China to carry out regional collaborative innovation and an important carrier for the construction of a regional innovation ecosystem. The evolution path of innovation ecosystem in a high-tech zone is divided into three [...] Read more.
High-tech zones are an important platform for local governments in China to carry out regional collaborative innovation and an important carrier for the construction of a regional innovation ecosystem. The evolution path of innovation ecosystem in a high-tech zone is divided into three stages: enterprise collection, industrial cluster, and system integration. The innovation subjects form a complex network system that transcends the physical boundary. This paper studies the relationship between innovation input, innovation output, and innovation environment from the perspective of cluster innovation ecosystem structure. Using data mining technology, this paper establishes an index variable system of the innovation ecosystem in a high-tech zone, which includes innovation input, innovation output, and innovation environment. Based on the data of the Nanning National High-tech Zone in China, empirical tests were carried out, using factor analysis and regression analysis to analyze the quantitative relationship between the input, output, and innovation environment of the Nanning High-tech Zone’s innovation ecosystem, and to explain the relationship between each other and the overall innovation of the high-tech zone. This research has certain practical significance for enriching and perfecting the theory of industrial clusters and studying the evolution of the innovation ecosystem of high-tech zones from a micro level. It has important, enlightening significance as a reference for the construction of innovative high-tech zones and the enhancement of high-tech zones’ independent innovation capabilities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
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Article
Business Model Innovation through a Rectangular Compass: From the Perspective of Open Innovation with Mechanism Design
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2020, 6(4), 131; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc6040131 - 01 Nov 2020
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 1413
Abstract
We aim to develop an innovative way to alter existing business models to conquer the growth limits of exponential paradox by applying the open innovation concept to the design of creative business models. Our research question is as follows: How can we innovate [...] Read more.
We aim to develop an innovative way to alter existing business models to conquer the growth limits of exponential paradox by applying the open innovation concept to the design of creative business models. Our research question is as follows: How can we innovate existing business models more easily based on our own thinking experiment at the role-place of ourselves in the open innovation knowledge funnel? We built a rectangular compass concept model and carried out social experiments with it for 3.6 years from November 2014 to May 2019 by developing 17 business model patents to validate the model. The rectangular compass concept model has four aspects: over-shooting of modern business models, expanding the bottom of modern business models, cultivating the forward neighborhood of modern business models, and cultivating the backward neighborhood of modern business model. According to our study, open innovation, which is based on a new combination between technologies (protected technology, protectable technology, and social technology) and market (now market, potential market, and social market), is the engine of sustainable business model innovation dynamics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
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Article
Corporate Social Responsibility during COVID-19 Pandemic
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2020, 6(4), 126; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc6040126 - 24 Oct 2020
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 6808
Abstract
The health, economic, and social consequences of the SARS-CoV-2 virus have highlighted the need for collaboration among all agents to face a scenario that we have not before seen. The aims of this paper are to analyze the involvement that large Spanish companies [...] Read more.
The health, economic, and social consequences of the SARS-CoV-2 virus have highlighted the need for collaboration among all agents to face a scenario that we have not before seen. The aims of this paper are to analyze the involvement that large Spanish companies have shown during the toughest moments of the epidemic and to determine the objectives these companies have pursued with them. The results show that several firms have shown a great commitment with society, developing actions that alleviate the consequences of the COVID-19 like others have developed several strategies with different objectives. More concretely, three clusters of responsibility have been identified: (i) protecting only the interests of shareholders and investors; (ii) favoring the wellbeing of the Spanish society in general and vulnerable groups in particular; and (iii) combining the previous altruistic actions with commercial interests. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
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Article
Digital Innovation Hubs as a Tool for Boosting Biomass Valorisation in Regional Bioeconomies: Andalusian and South-East Irish Case Studies
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2020, 6(4), 115; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc6040115 - 14 Oct 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2027
Abstract
Regional bioeconomy development is directly linked to the availability and access to bioresources. Therefore, it is necessary to trigger opportunities for information and communications technologies (ICTs), the Internet of things (IoT) and Industry 4.0 solutions to increase the efficiency of high potential value [...] Read more.
Regional bioeconomy development is directly linked to the availability and access to bioresources. Therefore, it is necessary to trigger opportunities for information and communications technologies (ICTs), the Internet of things (IoT) and Industry 4.0 solutions to increase the efficiency of high potential value biomass supply chains, improving this way the accessibility of bioresources. This study aims to present the results achieved through the development of Digital Innovation Hubs (DIHs) as a tool able to boost biomass valorisation, reshaping regional bioeconomy. The objective was to shape these DIHs and assess how stakeholders could be engaged and benefit from such initiatives. This has been attained through the design and implementation of DIHs in two case-study regions, Andalusia (Spain) and south-east Ireland (Ireland). The approaches and results for stakeholders’ engagement, barrier mitigation, DIH structure and activities are presented. So far, more than 100 stakeholders have been engaged, more than 50 business opportunities have been promoted and a set of support services and events have been carried out. Main lessons learned are (1) about the relevance of understanding the needs of stakeholders, (2) impact is bigger when relevant regional industries (rather than academia/technology providers) discuss the technologies they have integrated and how these have improved efficiency or added value to their processes, and (3) about the importance of the communication plan and a well-formed DIH service definition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
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Article
Does Open Innovation Enhance a Large Firm’s Financial Sustainability? A Case of the Korean Food Industry
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2020, 6(4), 101; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc6040101 - 01 Oct 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1107
Abstract
This study aims to explore whether a firm’s financial sustainability is enhanced by open innovation especially after a global financial crisis. There are few studies on the relationship between open innovation and financial sustainability. This study aimed to fill the literature gap by [...] Read more.
This study aims to explore whether a firm’s financial sustainability is enhanced by open innovation especially after a global financial crisis. There are few studies on the relationship between open innovation and financial sustainability. This study aimed to fill the literature gap by analyzing the change in the financial ratio according to the increase or decrease in open innovation. We used a case study method regarding large Korean food firms. Korea is a latecomer in the food industry, which is driven by large companies. This study is meaningful for financial sustainability studies of countries with a lack of resources and small market size, which require open innovation. The findings of this study are as follows: The most preferred alliance strategy of large food firms is joint research. In order to secure raw materials and markets, open innovation was actively conducted abroad, which increased growth and profitability. However, a firm which rarely adopts open innovation could grow steadily through internal strategies. On the other hand, although relatively many open innovations have been used, growth and profitability could decrease. Firms with sufficient absorptive capacity strengthen financial sustainability through open innovation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
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Article
A Comparative Analysis of Corporate R&D Capability and Innovation: Focused on the Korean Manufacturing Industry
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2020, 6(4), 100; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc6040100 - 01 Oct 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1233
Abstract
In order to improve innovation performance, it is necessary to analyze a series of processes that are connected to innovation performance, as well as R&D input. Since industrial characteristics affect innovation performance, the differences between corporate R&D capabilities in the industrial sector should [...] Read more.
In order to improve innovation performance, it is necessary to analyze a series of processes that are connected to innovation performance, as well as R&D input. Since industrial characteristics affect innovation performance, the differences between corporate R&D capabilities in the industrial sector should also be considered. This study verified the effect of R&D capabilities and absorptive capacities on innovation using a structural equation model for Korean manufacturing companies, and analyzed in-depth the relationship between capability and performance of high- and low-tech sectors through multi-group analysis. The results show that internal and external R&D capabilities had a positive effect on absorptive capacities, and potential absorptive capability had a positive effect on realized absorptive capacity. In addition, internal R&D capability and realized absorptive capacity had a positive effect on innovation, and the mediating effect of absorption capacities could be identified. As a result of industry sector-specific analysis, the latent mean of internal R&D capability and innovation of the high-tech sector were higher, and the path coefficient of the high-tech sector from the internal R&D capability to potential absorptive capacity and innovation performance was more strongly identified than those of the low-tech sector. Based on the results of this study, we would like to present policies for the development of firm’s R&D capabilities by the industry sector. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
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Article
The Government R&D Funding and Management Performance: The Mediating Effect of Technology Innovation
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2020, 6(4), 94; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc6040094 - 24 Sep 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 722
Abstract
Korea’s small- and medium-sized enterprises are desperate to improve their performance through engaging in technological innovation, due to the fierce competition prevalent in a low growth economic environment. However, most small- and medium-sized enterprises are having difficulty responding to changes in the economic [...] Read more.
Korea’s small- and medium-sized enterprises are desperate to improve their performance through engaging in technological innovation, due to the fierce competition prevalent in a low growth economic environment. However, most small- and medium-sized enterprises are having difficulty responding to changes in the economic environment due to the challenge of developing their own technologies and their limited resources. The aim of this study is to assess whether government financial support for R&D aimed at small- and medium-sized enterprises has contributed to improvements in their business management performance. The sample of this study was comprised of 105 KOSDAQ-listed small- and medium-sized enterprises with experience in technology development. The empirical analysis was conducted on the basis of the mediating effect measurement method of Baron and Kenny (1986). It was found that company technological innovation capabilities have a positive effect on management performance, and in particular, that the majority of companies that received government financial support for R&D have improved their management performance. Therefore, it is recommended that small- and medium-sized companies take an active part in various government R&D financial support programs and make efforts to strengthen their technological innovation in areas such as their product service and process innovation capabilities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
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Article
Towards a Longitudinal Outlook on Industry Transition Management
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2020, 6(3), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc6030079 - 11 Sep 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 917
Abstract
Innovation has been and continues to be an important theme in management literature, and almost any improvement upon the status quo could be regarded as some sort of innovation. Such an improvement could be made in terms of an increase of efficiency for [...] Read more.
Innovation has been and continues to be an important theme in management literature, and almost any improvement upon the status quo could be regarded as some sort of innovation. Such an improvement could be made in terms of an increase of efficiency for an existing process or the creation of something new, such as a new process, product, position (perception), or even a paradigm (mental model) (Tidd, Bessant et al., 2005). Not all innovations are therefore the same. Some are more disruptive, while others are incremental, reinforcing the existing order of things. This paper discusses the evolution of innovation as a management concept in the context of a physical product or technology and studies innovation from a longitudinal perspective, i.e., from a single physical product to a product family to smart services associated with the physical products and to the fourth industrial revolution (Industry 4.0) in which physical products are now part of an extensive industrial network, namely the internet of things. How does the theme of innovation (management) change and evolve during this industry transition? More importantly, what are the managerial implications for innovating in the era of Industry 4.0? Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
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Article
Optimal Exploitation of On-Street Parked Vehicles as Roadside Gateways for Social IoV—A Case of Kigali City
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2020, 6(3), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc6030073 - 03 Sep 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 908
Abstract
Vehicular Ad Hoc Network (VANET) is a subclass of Mobile Ad Hoc Network that mainly consists of moving and/or stationary vehicles, connected through wireless protocols such as IEEE 802.11p and wireless access in vehicular environments (WAVE). With the evolution of the Internet of [...] Read more.
Vehicular Ad Hoc Network (VANET) is a subclass of Mobile Ad Hoc Network that mainly consists of moving and/or stationary vehicles, connected through wireless protocols such as IEEE 802.11p and wireless access in vehicular environments (WAVE). With the evolution of the Internet of Things (IoT), ordinary VANET has turned to the Internet of Vehicles (IoV), with additional social aspects, a novel extension themed SIoV has become common in urban areas. However vehicular wireless communication paradigms exhibit short radio communication. This problem has always been approached by supplementing moving vehicles with stationary Road Side Infrastructures, commonly known as roadside units (RSUs). The penetration of such RSUs on the global market is very low; furthermore, their procurement, deployment, and maintenance costs are prohibitively very high. All mentioned challenges have discouraged the widespread deployment of roadside infrastructure especially within large urban scenarios. With this research, we leverage on-street parked vehicles to allow them to exist as temporal gateways in the case study area. A novel modeling technique is introduced to enable a specific Percentage of parked vehicles to take up the role of roadside gateways for a certain percentage of their parking time. A mobile application is implemented that manages parking duration of the vehicle, based on the arrival, and departure time frames. Two more existing strategies were discussed (road-intersection RSUs deployment approach and Inter-vehicle scheme) to validate our proposed method through comparative studies. To evaluate the network performance evaluation, we compare two performance metrics, that is, Packets success delivery rate, and overall packets throughput under numerous vehicle densities. Using parked vehicles as temporal roadside gateways has demonstrated better results in comparison to intersection based RSUs deployment approach, and free vehicle to vehicle communication approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
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Article
Susceptibility of Stock Market Returns to International Economic Policy: Evidence from Effective Transfer Entropy of Africa with the Implication for Open Innovation
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2020, 6(3), 71; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc6030071 - 28 Aug 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 755
Abstract
This study contributes to the scant finance literature on information flow from international economic policy uncertainty to emerging stock markets in Africa, using daily US economic policy uncertainty as a proxy and the daily stock market index for Botswana, Egypt, Ghana, Kenya, Morocco, [...] Read more.
This study contributes to the scant finance literature on information flow from international economic policy uncertainty to emerging stock markets in Africa, using daily US economic policy uncertainty as a proxy and the daily stock market index for Botswana, Egypt, Ghana, Kenya, Morocco, Nigeria, Namibia, South Africa, and Zambia from 31 December 2010 to 27 May 2020, using the Rényi effective transfer entropy. International economic policy uncertainty transmits significant information to Egypt, Ghana, Morocco, Namibia, and South Africa, and insignificant information to Botswana, Kenya, Nigeria, and Zambia. The asymmetry in the information transfer tends to make the African market an alternative for the diversification of international portfolios when the uncertainty of the global economic policy is on the rise. The findings also have implications for the adoption of open innovation in African stock markets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
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Article
The Intensity of Organizational Change and the Perception of Organizational Innovativeness; with Discussion on Open Innovation
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2020, 6(3), 66; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc6030066 - 20 Aug 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1734
Abstract
Each individual member of an organization must recognize and lead innovation, which can be affected by human resource development (HRD) investments and organizational changes. In this study, we aimed to verify how HRD investment at the individual level relates to employee perceptions of [...] Read more.
Each individual member of an organization must recognize and lead innovation, which can be affected by human resource development (HRD) investments and organizational changes. In this study, we aimed to verify how HRD investment at the individual level relates to employee perceptions of organizational innovativeness and to examine how the intensity of organizational change, a situational factor at the organizational level, affects the relationship between HRD investment and employee perceptions of organizational innovativeness through multilevel analysis using hierarchical linear models. We performed an analysis based on the responses from 5184 workers and 125 companies where corporate-level and personal-level data were matched in a Human Capital Corporate Panel (HCCP) survey. HRD investment by employees was shown to increase the perception of organizational innovativeness. The results demonstrated that the intensity of organizational change moderated the relationship between HRD investment and the perception of organizational innovativeness. However, the stronger the organizational change intensity, the weaker the positive effect of HRD investment on the perception of organizational innovativeness. Finally, we presented theoretical and practical implications and further research tasks related to the HRD of corporations and open innovation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
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Article
Open Science and Its Enemies: Challenges for a Sustainable Science–Society Social Contract
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2020, 6(3), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc6030061 - 03 Aug 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2293
Abstract
Science as a social institution has evolved as the most powerful, highly influential, and sought out institution after the conflicts between science and religion following Galileo. Knowledge as a public good, scientific peer review of science, the prominence of open publications, and the [...] Read more.
Science as a social institution has evolved as the most powerful, highly influential, and sought out institution after the conflicts between science and religion following Galileo. Knowledge as a public good, scientific peer review of science, the prominence of open publications, and the emphasis on professional recognition and scientific autonomy have been the hallmark of science in the past three centuries. According to this scientific spirit, the scientific social system and society formed a unique social contract. This social contract drew considerable institutional and state legitimacy for the openness and public good of science in the service of state and society, all through the post-war period. Openness and public good of science are recognized and legitimized by the scientific community and science agencies at the global level. This paradigm of open science, in varying forms and manifestations, contributed to the progress of systematic knowledge at the service of humankind over the last three centuries. Entering the third decade of the 21st century, the social contract between science and society is undergoing major changes. In fact, the whole paradigm of open science and its social contract is being challenged by various “enemies” or adversaries such as (a) market-based privatized commercial science, (b) industry 4.0 advanced technologies, and (c) a “new iron curtain” on the free flow of science data and information. What is at stake? Are there major changes? Is the very social institution of science transforming? What impact will this have on our contemporary and future sustainable society? These are some important issues that will be addressed in this article. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
Article
A Need for Co-Evolution between Technological Innovations and Social Innovations
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2020, 6(3), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc6030054 - 28 Jul 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 802
Abstract
The 4th industrial revolution must be approached from the perspective of industrial ecosystem in order to lead to industrial reorganization facing after deindustrialization. This is because, as the characteristics of agriculture and manufacturing differ, the basic characteristics of industries related to the 4th [...] Read more.
The 4th industrial revolution must be approached from the perspective of industrial ecosystem in order to lead to industrial reorganization facing after deindustrialization. This is because, as the characteristics of agriculture and manufacturing differ, the basic characteristics of industries related to the 4th industrial revolution differ from those of manufacturing. Differences in the way agriculture and manufacturing value is created require differences in human type, social systems, and even distribution system. That is, just as ecosystems focus on the interrelationship of organisms and their relationship with the physical environment, the industrial ecosystems to be accompanied by the 4th industrial revolution require new human beings to live in the new industrial ecosystem and new systems to support the new industrial ecosystem, with new technologies in the related fields. This paper will show that the industrial ecosystem required by the 4th industrial revolution calls for Homo empathicus different from Homo economicus of industrial society, a reciprocal economy different from the capitalist economy, and an autonomous democracy different from free democracy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
Article
The Competence of Project Team Members and Success Factors with Open Innovation
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2020, 6(3), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc6030051 - 22 Jul 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1749
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between emotional, managerial, and intellectual competence of team members, which refer to the LDQ (Leadership Development Questionnaire) and impact on project success. (1) Background: Large and complex projects are being conducted in a [...] Read more.
The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between emotional, managerial, and intellectual competence of team members, which refer to the LDQ (Leadership Development Questionnaire) and impact on project success. (1) Background: Large and complex projects are being conducted in a dynamic business environment. The need for capabilities and managerial aspects of participants of the project for business performance increases. (2) Methods: A questionnaire survey was conducted on 164 project management professionals in various industries from Korea. The structural equation modeling technique was performed to establish the effect of competence of team members on project success factor. (3) Results: The results provided empirical support for the impact of team members’ competencies on project success factor. Moreover, there is no difference in the perception of the impact of team members’ competencies on project success factor, depending on their roles, such as project manager and team member. (4) Results: In this paper, the importance of the competence of team members in accordance with the project manager was presented. The findings of this study suggest the strategic direction of the members at this point when corporate innovation is needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
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Article
Collaborative Governance for Responsible Innovation in the Context of Sharing Economy: Studies on the Shared Bicycle Sector in China
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2020, 6(2), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc6020035 - 06 May 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1215
Abstract
The shared bicycle sector is a new type of rental business that combines the sharing economy with technology platforms. With its convenience, efficiency and low cost, the business has become popular in China. However, alongside the development of the shared bicycle industry, the [...] Read more.
The shared bicycle sector is a new type of rental business that combines the sharing economy with technology platforms. With its convenience, efficiency and low cost, the business has become popular in China. However, alongside the development of the shared bicycle industry, the increasing number of products, lack of governance, distrust between companies and users cause problems due to irresponsibility. This paper focuses on the governance of the shared bicycle sector, with the aim of achieving responsible innovation through a collaboration among stakeholders. Through case studies on two cities in China, the paper identifies government policies in the traditional context of hard-law regulation, and in the new context of multi-collaborative governance. The roles of government, industry and society are specified in the innovation ecosystem and are linked with the key dimensions of responsible innovation, anticipation, reflectiveness, inclusiveness and responsiveness. Based on the findings, a model is proposed, suggesting the new government roles of alliance facilitator and platform coordinator. Finally, our recommendations for the improvement of the shared bicycle sector are made and areas for future research are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
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Article
The Passway of Women Entrepreneurship: Starting from Social Capital with Open Innovation, through to Knowledge Sharing and Innovative Performance
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2020, 6(2), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc6020025 - 17 Apr 2020
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 2229
Abstract
Customs and culture should create women’s independence to actualize themselves in an era of emerging social progress in order to lead to the domination of women in the development of creative businesses. This research examines the role of social capital and whether it [...] Read more.
Customs and culture should create women’s independence to actualize themselves in an era of emerging social progress in order to lead to the domination of women in the development of creative businesses. This research examines the role of social capital and whether it becomes a supporting or hindering factor in developing the creative industry of women entrepreneurs by examining the role of information sharing and innovations. Employing purposive sampling, questionnaires were distributed to 200 women entrepreneurs, and data were analyzed by using Structural Equation Modeling(PLS–SEM)software with SmartPLS Version 3.0. Social capital has a positive influence on the business performance of women entrepreneurs in Bali, Indonesia. Thus, the beliefs and norms that exist in the social capital of the Balinese Hindu concept can filter the information obtained from various information in business, which will ultimately be utilized by women entrepreneurs to create various innovations to meet the market demand. However, opportunities for women entrepreneurs are very limited to capital due to lack of guarantees to get capital, and a lack of entrepreneurship skills in the technological era, market access, bureaucracy, and legalization. Further, managerial skills, access to information technology, as well as the perspective that the men must be superior in Balinese culture and customs, make business for women entrepreneurs limited. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
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Article
Silicon Valley Imperialists Create New Model Villages as Smart Cities in Their Own Image
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2020, 6(2), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc6020024 - 08 Apr 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1322
Abstract
In her study of ‘Surveillance Capitalism’, Shoshana Zuboff cites Google’s parent firm Alphabet’s legal customer-purchase agreement for the parent firm’s Nest thermostats. These impose ‘oppressive privacy and security consequences’ requiring sensitive information to be shared through ‘Internet-of-Things’ (IoT) networks with other domestic and [...] Read more.
In her study of ‘Surveillance Capitalism’, Shoshana Zuboff cites Google’s parent firm Alphabet’s legal customer-purchase agreement for the parent firm’s Nest thermostats. These impose ‘oppressive privacy and security consequences’ requiring sensitive information to be shared through ‘Internet-of-Things’ (IoT) networks with other domestic and external devices, unnamed functionaries and various third parties. This is for data harvesting, analytics, processing, manipulation and transformation through digital re-sale to the same and other consumers in the form of unwanted, targeted advertising. The point of this identity ‘rendition’ is to massively augment corporate profits. It is but a short step from trapping the unwitting consumer in a ‘smart home’ to planning a similarly mediated ‘smart city’ aimed at further massively augmenting corporate profits. This is happening, as founders of digital media from Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Amazon and Tesla either commission or become beneficiaries of ‘smart city’ planning. However, there is evidence that such imperiousness is increasingly countered by emerging democratic critique of these new ‘model villages’ or ‘company towns’. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
Article
Do Synergies Pop up Magically in Digital Transformation-Based Retail M&A? Valuing Synergies with Real Options Application
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2020, 6(1), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc6010018 - 06 Mar 2020
Viewed by 1244
Abstract
This paper aims to explore and to illustrate success factors of reciprocal synergies of digital transformation-based merger and acquisition (M&A) deals in the grocery retail industry. The author carried out a case study on the merger of Ahold Delhaize in 2016. The paper’s [...] Read more.
This paper aims to explore and to illustrate success factors of reciprocal synergies of digital transformation-based merger and acquisition (M&A) deals in the grocery retail industry. The author carried out a case study on the merger of Ahold Delhaize in 2016. The paper’s contribution is a conceptual model of research that helps in pre-acquisition analysis on competence-based synergies in M&A to value strategic synergies as market value added a using real options application. By combining qualitative and quantitative research methods, the author provides empirical evidence to indicate the validity and value of the proposed research framework for both scholars and practitioners alike. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Linking Business Ecosystem and Natural Ecosystem Together—A Sustainable Pathway for Future Industrialization
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2021, 7(1), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc7010038 - 19 Jan 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 740
Abstract
China has emerged as the second largest economy in the world during the globalization in the last forty years. However, in the last decade, Chinese manufacturing has also demonstrated its dark side causing wide range of concerns globally and directly jeopardize people’s health [...] Read more.
China has emerged as the second largest economy in the world during the globalization in the last forty years. However, in the last decade, Chinese manufacturing has also demonstrated its dark side causing wide range of concerns globally and directly jeopardize people’s health because of serious pollutions. How could the world keep its industrialization yet without damages to the natural environment? The paper proposes a new framework entitled ‘IE3’ by integrating three domains of knowledge—Industrial Entrepreneurship, Industrial Engineering and Industrial Ecology. The IE3 model provides a potential answer to the future development pathway for industrialization, changing from pursuit of quantity to quality via considering resources efficiency and ecology efficiency. The novelty of the research lies in incorporating three originally separated theories into a comprehensive system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
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Review
Gender Diversity in Boards of Directors: A Bibliometric Mapping
J. Open Innov. Technol. Mark. Complex. 2021, 7(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/joitmc7010012 - 31 Dec 2020
Viewed by 1053
Abstract
The literature on gender diversity in boards of directors has expanded significantly in recent years, due to the fact that women are increasingly holding higher management positions within the company hierarchy, clearly demonstrating that certain characteristics of women have a positive impact on [...] Read more.
The literature on gender diversity in boards of directors has expanded significantly in recent years, due to the fact that women are increasingly holding higher management positions within the company hierarchy, clearly demonstrating that certain characteristics of women have a positive impact on different areas within the company. The objective of this paper is to analyze scientific articles on the presence of women in boards of directors, based on a literature review, in order to learn about the evolution of this concept over time. The search conducted for this paper produced 300 documents from the Web of Science, with a final total result of 168 documents after passing the initial results through various filters. VOSviewer software was used to analyze the information, which enabled the creation of bibliometric citation, co-citation and co-word maps. The results reveal the most relevant authors and studies on this subject and identify the most current studies, the main topic of which deals with sustainability and corporate social responsibility, in addition to highlighting the characteristics of women that are of vital importance to boards of directors within the current context: empathy, open innovation, concern for the needs of interest groups and a heightened perception of risks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ambidextrous Open Innovation: Technology, Market and Complexity)
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