Next Article in Journal
Estimating the Spatial Distribution of Soil Properties Using Environmental Variables at a Catchment Scale in the Loess Hilly Area, China
Next Article in Special Issue
The Great Recession and Children’s Mental Health in Australia
Previous Article in Journal
Participation in Physical Activity is Associated with Sexual Activity in Older English Adults
Previous Article in Special Issue
Growth Hormone (GH) Therapy During the Transition Period: Should We Think about Early Retesting in Patients with Idiopathic and Isolated GH Deficiency?
Article Menu
Issue 3 (February-1) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(3), 490; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16030490

The Asti Study: The Induction of Oxidative Stress in A Population of Children According to Their Body Composition and Passive Tobacco Smoking Exposure

1
Department of Public Health and Pediatrics, University of Turin, 10126 Turin, Italy
2
Maugeri Scientific Clinical Institutes, 27100 Pavia, Italy
3
City of Health and Science of Turin, Molinette Hospital, 10145 Turin, Italy
4
SUISM, Structure of Hygiene, Sport Sciences and Physical Activities, headquarters of Asti, University of Turin, 10126 Turin, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 11 January 2019 / Revised: 1 February 2019 / Accepted: 7 February 2019 / Published: 9 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances of Adolescents and Children Health Research)
Full-Text   |   PDF [910 KB, uploaded 9 February 2019]   |  

Abstract

Obesity and exposure to second-hand tobacco smoking (SHS) may influence oxidative stress (OS) levels, especially in children. This study investigated body composition and SHS influence on OS induction in the paediatric population. The first purpose was identifying an appropriate BMI standard for adiposity assessment in OS investigations. Secondly, SHS and obesity were analysed as inductors of OS. The epidemiologic sample involved 330 children. Three BMI (body mass index) references (IOTF, CDC, and WHO) and an impedentiometric scale supplied body-composition measurements. Partecipants filled out a questionnaire and provided urinary samples for biomarker quantifications: isoprostane (15-F2t IsoP) and cotinine as OS and SHS biomarker, respectively. Obesity prevalence changed over different BMI references (14%, 21%, and 34% for IOTF, CDC, and WHO, respectively). Obese children, by IOTF, showed an increase of 56% in 15-F2t IsoP compared to those normal weight (p = 0.020). Children belonging to the third and the fourth cotinine quartile compared to those of the first quartile had higher 15-F2t IsoP (1.45 ng/mg, 95% CI: 1.06–1.97, p = 0.020 and 2.04 ng/mg, 95% CI: 1.55–2.69, p < 0.0001, respectively). Obesity assessment in children requires appropriate BMI reference depending on research field. Both SHS exposure and obesity may increase OS in children. View Full-Text
Keywords: oxidative stress; children; Public Health; obesity; BMI; second-hand smoke oxidative stress; children; Public Health; obesity; BMI; second-hand smoke
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Squillacioti, G.; Bellisario, V.; Grignani, E.; Mengozzi, G.; Bardaglio, G.; Dalmasso, P.; Bono, R. The Asti Study: The Induction of Oxidative Stress in A Population of Children According to Their Body Composition and Passive Tobacco Smoking Exposure. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 490.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top