Special Issue "Bioactive Compounds in Horticultural Plants"

A special issue of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524). This special issue belongs to the section "Developmental Physiology, Biochemistry, and Molecular Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 October 2022 | Viewed by 1176

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Loredana Elena Vijan
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Guest Editor
Faculty of Science, Physical Education and Informatics, University of Pitesti, RO-110040 Pitesti, Romania
Interests: bioactive compounds in horticultural plants; adsorption studies of some organic pollutants on mesoporous activated carbon; UV-Vis and steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy; quantum chemistry
Prof. Dr. Mihai Botu
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Horticulture and Food Science, Faculty of Horticulture, University of Craiova, RO-200585 Craiova, Romania
Interests: fruit and nut crops breeding; collecting, evaluation and conservation of plant genetic resources; plant propagation; sustainable and organic horticulture; bioactive compounds
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The plant kingdom is a source of essential nutrients, and also provides constituents with biological activity for human and animal bodies. A wide variety of compounds and complexes participate in processes that maintain the integrity of the vegetal organism, and can have functions in human and animal organisms in equal measure. The Special Issue "Bioactive compounds in horticultural plants" aims to present a comprehensive analysis of plants as bioactive compounds sources, to identify the vegetal organs in which they are found at the highest level and the timing of their maximum availability. It will highlight the structural and functional diversity of biologically active compounds, the established synergistic or antagonistic relationships, and how the isolation of some components could affect their activity.

Another concern is the role that bioactive compounds play in the body as antioxidants, protectors of the structural, functional, and energetic components; adjuvants of physiological processes; their antiviral and antimicrobial properties, as well as the role of an activator/suppressor of enzymatic systems or genes.

Studies on non-beneficial actions (antinutrient activity or interaction with drugs), the prooxidant role they may play in certain circumstances, and alterations in the activity of the biomolecule as a result of treatments during extraction or processing protocols are also of interest.

Bioactive compounds remain among the most studied plant components, and understanding the relationships between them and those related to the reaction environment can clarify problems related to their activity, the success of isolation and quantification, and the study of biological activity both in vitro and in vivo.

This Special Issue aims to highlight the perspectives of an unlimited research field that offers solutions or models for optimal achievement of the benefits possessed by the plant kingdom.

Dr. Loredana Elena Elena Vijan
Prof. Dr. Mihai Botu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Horticulturae is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioactive compounds in horticultural plants
  • extraction techniques
  • processing technologies
  • antinutrients
  • prooxidant effect

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Phytochemical Composition of Red-Fleshed Apple Cultivar ‘Baya Marisa’ Compared to Traditional, White-Fleshed Apple Cultivar ‘Golden Delicious’
Horticulturae 2022, 8(9), 811; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae8090811 - 04 Sep 2022
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Abstract
We analyzed the red-fleshed apple cultivar ‘Baya Marisa’ and compared it with the traditional, white-fleshed apple cultivar ‘Golden Delicious’. The objective of this study was to compare sugars, organic acids, and phenolic compounds of ‘Baya Marisa’ with the widely known and consumed white-fleshed [...] Read more.
We analyzed the red-fleshed apple cultivar ‘Baya Marisa’ and compared it with the traditional, white-fleshed apple cultivar ‘Golden Delicious’. The objective of this study was to compare sugars, organic acids, and phenolic compounds of ‘Baya Marisa’ with the widely known and consumed white-fleshed apple cultivar ‘Golden Delicious’. In addition, flesh firmness, color, and soluble solid content was studied. A total of 46 phenolic compounds were quantified and identified, some for the first time in apples. The study showed that the total analyzed phenolic content (TAPC) was 1.6× higher in the skin of red-fleshed ‘Baya Marisa’ and 1.4× higher in the flesh of red-fleshed ‘Baya Marisa’. Organic acid (citric acid, malic acid, and ascorbic acid) content was higher in the red-fleshed cultivar ‘Baya Marisa’, whereas sugar content (sucrose, glucose, and sorbitol) was similar, except for fructose, which was 1.1× higher in ‘Golden Delicious’. The content of citric acid was 1.6× higher in ‘Baya Marisa’, whereas the content of malic acid was 1.2× higher in ‘Baya Marisa’ and the content of ascorbic acid was 2.8× higher in ‘Baya Marisa’. Among phenolics, total dihydrochalcones in the skin were 3.3× higher in ‘Baya Marisa’ and similar in the flesh compared to ‘Golden Delicious’. Flavonols were 1.4× higher in the skin of ‘Baya Marisa’ and 2.8× higher in the flesh of ‘Golden Delicious’. Anthocyanins were not identified in the white-fleshed cultivar ‘Golden Delicious’. Total hydroxycinnamic acids were 2.0× higher in the skin of ‘Golden Delicious’ and similar in the flesh compared to ‘Baya Marisa’. Total flavanols were 1.8× higher in the skin and 2.2× higher in the flesh of the white-fleshed cultivar ‘Golden Delicious’. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds in Horticultural Plants)
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Article
The Influence of Harvest Moment and Cultivar on Variability of Some Chemical Constituents and Antiradical Activity of Dehydrated Chokeberry Pomace
Horticulturae 2022, 8(6), 544; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae8060544 - 18 Jun 2022
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Abstract
This paper’s aim was to study how the antioxidant activity and the level of certain phenolic complexes and carotenoids vary in the pomace obtained from the fruits of two cultivars of chokeberry at different times of harvest after reaching the stage of maturity. [...] Read more.
This paper’s aim was to study how the antioxidant activity and the level of certain phenolic complexes and carotenoids vary in the pomace obtained from the fruits of two cultivars of chokeberry at different times of harvest after reaching the stage of maturity. The influence of the cultivar, harvest moment, and the combined effect of these two factors on the antioxidant activity and the dehydrated pomace content in components with antioxidant potentials, such as total phenolics, total tannins, total flavonoids, lycopene, and β-carotene was analyzed. The methanolic extract from the pomace obtained from the ‘Melrom’ cultivar had the highest efficiency (92.14 ± 5.02%). The antiradical activity of the pomace was maximal (93.27 ± 4.32%) after the middle of the harvest season (3 September). The pomace obtained from the ‘Nero’ cultivar displayed superior levels of phenolic content (13,030.16 ± 1414.46 mg/100 g), flavonoids (4627.83 ± 509.63 mg CE/100 g), tannins (7458.56 ± 529.43 mg/100 g), and lycopene (1.171 ± 0.388 mg/100 g). The ‘Melrom’ cultivar presented superior content of β-carotene (0.313 ± 0.07 mg/100 g). On average, a positive significant correlation between radical scavenging activity with total phenolic content and β-carotene was observed. The combined cultivar × harvest moment effect was reflected in the variations in the total tannins content and the total flavonoid content, but also in the antiradical activity of the methanolic extracts. Dehydrated pomace from chokeberry fruit can be an important source of antioxidant biological compounds and can be used to make innovative foods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds in Horticultural Plants)
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