Special Issue "Genetic Control of Forest Tree Traits and Their Interaction with Environment"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Genetics and Molecular Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. María Rosario García-Gil
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC), Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901-83 Umeå, Sweden
Interests: forest breeding; genomic selection; trees local adaptation; genetics of wood formation; forest biodiversity; inbreeding/inbreeding depression

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sustainable forestry is a cornerstone in the transition to the post-carbon economy, where forests play a key role as a source of sustainable biomass. The growing demand for biomass is being challenges by the negative impact of climate change on forest productivity caused by multiple biotic and abiotic stress. This urges a better understanding of the genetic control of forest tree traits associated to production, and to develop models for accelerated assisted adaptation of our forests to guarantee a healthy and productive feedstock. We call for research works in the field of forest genetics that advance our understanding on the genetic control of forest tree traits of economic and ecological value, and their interaction with a changing environment. We encourage for research works that provide novel models for the implementation of genomics and remote sensing tools to accelerate and assist forest genetic adaptation to secure production and biodiversity.

Dr. María Rosario García-Gil
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • statistical genetics
  • population genetics
  • biodiversity
  • QTL analysis
  • Omics
  • biotic stress
  • abiotic stress
  • remote sensing

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Multi-Level Genetic Variation and Selection Strategy of Neolamarckia cadamba in Successive Years
Forests 2021, 12(11), 1455; https://doi.org/10.3390/f12111455 - 25 Oct 2021
Viewed by 318
Abstract
Neolamarckia cadamba (Roxb.) Bosser is a tropical evergreen broadleaf tree species that could play an important role in meeting the increasing demand for wood products. However, multi-level genetic variation and selection efficiency for growth traits in N. cadamba is poorly characterized. We therefore [...] Read more.
Neolamarckia cadamba (Roxb.) Bosser is a tropical evergreen broadleaf tree species that could play an important role in meeting the increasing demand for wood products. However, multi-level genetic variation and selection efficiency for growth traits in N. cadamba is poorly characterized. We therefore investigated the efficiency of early selection in N. cadamba by monitoring the height (HT), diameter at breast height (DBH), and tree volume (V) in 39 half-sib families from 11 provenances at ages 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 years in a progeny test. Age-related trends in growth rate, genetic parameters in multi-level, efficiency of early selection, and realized gain in multi-level for growth traits were analyzed. The result showed that genetic variation among families within provenances was higher than that among provenances. The estimated individual heritability values for the growth traits ranged from 0.05 to 0.26, indicating that the variation of growth traits in N. cadamba was subject to weak or intermediate genetic control. The age–age genetic correlations for growth traits were always positive and high (0.51–0.99), and the relationships between the genetic/phenotypic correlations and the logarithm of the age ratio (LAR) were described well by linear models (R2 > 0.85, except the fitting coefficient of genetic correlation and LAR for HT was 0.35). On the basis of an early selection efficiency analysis, we found that it is the best time to perform early selection for N. cadamba at age 5 before half-rotation, and the selection efficiencies were 157.28%, 151.56%, and 127.08% for V, DBH, and HT, respectively. Higher realized gain can be obtained by selecting superior trees from superior families. These results can be expected to provide theoretical guidance and materials for breeding programs in N. cadamba and can even be a reference for breeding strategies of other fast-growing tree species. Full article
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Article
Genetic Diversity and Population Genetic Structure of Ancient Platycladus orientalis L. (Cupressaceae) in the Middle Reaches of the Yellow River by Chloroplast Microsatellite Markers
Forests 2021, 12(5), 592; https://doi.org/10.3390/f12050592 - 09 May 2021
Viewed by 748
Abstract
Ancient trees are famous for their life spans of hundreds or even thousands of years. These trees are rare, a testament to history and are important for scientific research. Platycladus orientalis, with the longest life span and a beautiful trunk, has become [...] Read more.
Ancient trees are famous for their life spans of hundreds or even thousands of years. These trees are rare, a testament to history and are important for scientific research. Platycladus orientalis, with the longest life span and a beautiful trunk, has become the most widely planted tree species and is believed to be sacred in China. Extensive declines in habitat area and quality pose the greatest threats to the loss of genetic diversity of ancient P. orientalis trees in the middle reaches of the Yellow River. Strengthening the protection of P. orientalis genetic resources is of great significance for the long-term development of reasonable conservation and breeding strategies. To better understand the genetic diversity and population structure of P. orientalis, we successfully analyzed four polymorphic chloroplast simple sequence repeat (cpSSR) loci and applied them to diversity and population structure analyses of 202 individuals from 13 populations in the middle reaches of the Yellow River. Based on the cpSSR data, 16 alleles were detected across 202 individuals, and a moderate level of genetic diversity was inferred from the genetic diversity parameters (H = 0.367 and AR = 1.964). The mean pairwise genetic differentiation coefficient (Fst) between populations was 0.153, indicating relatively high genetic population differentiations. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed that only 8% of the variation occurred among populations. Structure analysis divided the 13 P. orientalis populations into two groups with no significant geographic population structure, which was consistent with the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) and Mantel test results. These results may indicate that transplanting and cultivation by ancient human activities are the main factors responsible for the revealed pattern of genetic differentiation of ancient P. orientalis populations. Our research is of great significance for the future establishment of protection schemes and scientific breeding of P. orientalis. Full article
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