Special Issue "Impact of Global Change on Insect Biodiversity in Forests"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Biodiversity".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Jakub Horák
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Forestry and Wood Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcká 1176, CZ-165 21 Prague, Czech Republic
Interests: biodiversity; dead wood; forest ecology; management; saproxylic insects
Dr. Adam Véle
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Forestry & Game Management Research Institute, Strnady 136, Jíloviště CZ-252 02, Czech Republic
Interests: ants; biodiversity; biological protection; forest management; pest

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Global change (e.g., climate change, land use, pollution, introduced species, biogeochemical cycles, and their synergism) strongly influence native and also production forests. The result is deforestation or changes in the dynamics and structure of forests. Therefore, there is not only a change in environmental conditions but also in insect communities. An insect can be affected directly or indirectly (through environmental conditions, food webs, etc). Insects are an indispensable component of forest ecosystems, and their biodiversity is most important not only for ecosystem functioning, but also for wood production. Therefore, the recent, rapidly growing extinction rates of insects are most definitely alarming. Changes in the abundance or distribution of insect taxa lead to changes in community composition and diversity not only at local but also at wider geographical scales, with implications for ecosystem processes. For these reasons, it is essential to gain sufficient knowledge about the changes in insect biodiversity driven by global change.

This Special Issue of Forests is focused on insect biodiversity in forests under global change. Research articles may focus on the occurrence and population dynamics of individual species or multitaxa studies, in dependence on environmental changes. Studies dealing with the effect of management aimed at promoting biodiversity are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Jakub Horák
Dr. Adam Véle
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biodiversity
  • ecology
  • environment
  • forest
  • global change
  • insect

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Modeling Climatic Influences on Three Parasitoids of Low-Density Spruce Budworm Populations. Part 2: Meteorus trachynotus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)
Forests 2021, 12(2), 155; https://doi.org/10.3390/f12020155 - 28 Jan 2021
Viewed by 407
Abstract
This is the second article of a series of three where we develop temperature-driven models to describe the seasonal interactions between parasitoids and their hosts which we use to explore the impact of climate on their spatiotemporal biology. Here, we model the biology [...] Read more.
This is the second article of a series of three where we develop temperature-driven models to describe the seasonal interactions between parasitoids and their hosts which we use to explore the impact of climate on their spatiotemporal biology. Here, we model the biology of Meteorus trachynotus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) with an individual-based model of its daily interactions with two host species. This model predicts the performance of the parasitoid in response to temperature affecting its seasonal development and that of the two hosts. We compare model output with an extensive set of field observations from natural host populations. The predicted activity of the first adult parasitoid generation closely matches the seasonal pattern of attack on the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) within the limitations of available data. The model predicts 1–4 full generations of M. trachynotus per year in eastern North America, with generations well synchronized with larvae of a known overwintering host, the obliquebanded leafroller Choristoneura rosaceana. The model predicts the observed density dependence of parasitism on spruce budworm. Predicted performance exhibits spatial variation caused by complex life-history interactions, especially synchrony with the overwintering host. This leads to a better performance in warm but not hot environments at middle latitudes and elevations. The model’s predicted spatial patterns correspond closely to our field observations on the frequency of parasitism on spruce budworm. Under climate change, the model predicts that the performance of M. trachynotus populations will improve in the northern portion of its range. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Global Change on Insect Biodiversity in Forests)
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Article
Modeling Climatic Influences on Three Parasitoids of Low-Density Spruce Budworm Populations. Part 1: Tranosema rostrale (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae)
Forests 2020, 11(8), 846; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11080846 - 05 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 772
Abstract
Despite their importance as mortality factors of many insects, the detailed biology and ecology of parasitoids often remain unknown. To gain insights into the spatiotemporal biology of insect parasitoids in interaction with their hosts, modeling of temperature-dependent development, reproduction, and survival is a [...] Read more.
Despite their importance as mortality factors of many insects, the detailed biology and ecology of parasitoids often remain unknown. To gain insights into the spatiotemporal biology of insect parasitoids in interaction with their hosts, modeling of temperature-dependent development, reproduction, and survival is a powerful tool. In this first article of a series of three, we modeled the biology of Tranosema rostrale at the seasonal level with a three-species individual-based model that took into account the temperature-dependent performance of the parasitoid and two of its hosts. The predicted activity of the first adult parasitoid generation closely matched the seasonal pattern of attack on the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). The model predicted 1–4 full generations of T. rostrale per year in eastern North America. The generations were generally well synchronized with the occurrence of larvae of a probable alternate host, the obliquebanded leafroller Choristoneura rosaceana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), which could be used as an overwintering host. Spatial differences in predicted performance were caused by complex interactions of life-history traits and synchrony with the overwintering host, which led to a better overall performance in environments at higher elevations or along the coasts. Under a climate warming scenario, regions of higher T. rostrale performance were predicted to generally move northward, making especially lower elevations in the southern range less suitable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Global Change on Insect Biodiversity in Forests)
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