Advances in Technology and Solutions for Wood Processing

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Wood Science and Forest Products".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 3233

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Environmental and Forestry Machinery, Faculty of Technology, Technical University in Zvolen, Študentská 26, 96001 Zvolen, Slovakia
Interests: forest machinery; wood processing; cutting mechanisms; physical properties of materials; forest biomass; agrophysics; machine construction

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Guest Editor
Department of Woodworking, Faculty of Wood Sciences and Technology, Technical University in Zvolen, T. G. Masaryka 24, 96001 Zvolen, Slovakia
Interests: chip and chipless machining of wood and wood-based materials; CNC technology in the woodworking industry; wood cutting tools; optimization of processes in the woodworking industry; issue of Industry 4.0
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Guest Editor
Faculty of Forestry, University of Agriculture in Krakow, 31425 Krakow, Poland
Interests: physical characteristics of materials; forest biomass; agrophysics; mechanization of nursery works; machinery construction; automation and robotization of production processes
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The development of more complex equipment and progressive technologies for the purpose of reducing energy and material requirements, increasing machine reliability and automating management has encouraged the exploration of the theoretical foundations of processes and the use of forest technology ever more widely and deeply. Wood is a natural resource that creates challenging conditions for processing machines. It is necessary to appropriately mechanize wood processing to produce a process sufficient to fast and high-quality operations associated with wood processing.

Since technology and technology are developing very quickly, it is necessary to pay closer attention to the issue of wood division, whether in the field of logging or further processing. Research and development are currently devoted to the improvement of existing methods of mechanical wood cutting and the development of new systems for further processing of wood.

Wood cutting is generally defined as a basic technological process in the production and processing of wood. It significantly affects the organization of production, efficiency, work safety, product quality and the amount of energy consumed. Understanding these factors and their mutual interactions will help researchers to fully understand the very principle of the woodworking process. Knowledge of this issue will help us to eliminate undesirable negative phenomena during wood processing and thus the loss of wood raw material, improving the quality of the entire process from various points of view.

Dr. Ján Kováč
Dr. Richard Kminiak
Prof. Dr. Paweł Tylek
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • forest machines
  • logging
  • wood cutting
  • wood processing mechanisms
  • energy intensity of the process
  • new trends
  • woodworking process

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 1502 KiB  
Article
Physico-Mechanical and Energy Properties of Pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Beech (Fagus sylvatica) Wood from Railroad Ties
by Monika Aniszewska, Arkadiusz Gendek, Barbora Tamelová, Jan Malaťák, Jan Velebil, Jozef Krilek, Iveta Čabalová, Ireneusz Mikłaszewicz, Witold Zychowicz, Michał Drożdżek and Andrzej Mazurek
Forests 2024, 15(3), 485; https://doi.org/10.3390/f15030485 - 5 Mar 2024
Viewed by 834
Abstract
The objective of the present work was to determine the physico-mechanical and energy properties of pine (Pinus sylvestris) and beech (Fagus sylvatica) wood from railroad ties. The ties were divided into internal and external parts as well as into [...] Read more.
The objective of the present work was to determine the physico-mechanical and energy properties of pine (Pinus sylvestris) and beech (Fagus sylvatica) wood from railroad ties. The ties were divided into internal and external parts as well as into parts impregnated and unimpregnated with creosote oil. The effects of creosote impregnation on wood hardness, compressive strength parallel to the grain, static bending strength, and calorific value were studied. The obtained results show that the parameters of the analyzed samples meet the standard requirements (EN 338) for construction wood (compressive and bending strength class: C50—pine; D70—beech). Depending on the particular property being studied, both pine and beech samples belong to the highest or one of the highest wood quality classes. Creosote oil considerably increased wood density (by 9% for beech and 19% for pine) but did not affect its hardness. Creosote impregnation significantly improved the compressive strength parallel to the grain of both wood species (beech: σc=51.99 MPa (IN); σc=57.78 MPa (OUT); pine: σc=36.56 MPa (IN); σc=42.45 MPa (OUT)); in the case of static bending strength, its value was increased for beech wood (σg=106.13 MPa (IN); σg=113.18 MPa (OUT)) and reduced for pine wood (σg=66.34 MPa (IN); σg=82.62 MPa (OUT)). The oil contained in wood from ties significantly elevated its calorific value (by 25% for beech and 10% for pine). Unfortunately, the presence of creosote oil currently prevents wood from railroad ties from being reused as the oil is deemed hazardous and carcinogenic. However, if it were possible to isolate the unimpregnated parts of railroad ties, they could be reapplied for construction or other uses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Technology and Solutions for Wood Processing)
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19 pages, 5027 KiB  
Article
Comparison of Surface Roughness of Beech Wood after Sanding with an Eccentric and Belt Sander
by Lukáš Adamčík, Ladislav Dzurenda, Adrián Banski and Richard Kminiak
Forests 2024, 15(1), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/f15010045 - 25 Dec 2023
Viewed by 912
Abstract
The presented paper deals with a mutual comparison of the roughness of the sanded radial surface after an eccentric and a belt sander. The beech wood (Fagus sylvatica L.) was sanded with an eccentric sander ETS 125 REQ-PLUS and a belt sander [...] Read more.
The presented paper deals with a mutual comparison of the roughness of the sanded radial surface after an eccentric and a belt sander. The beech wood (Fagus sylvatica L.) was sanded with an eccentric sander ETS 125 REQ-PLUS and a belt sander BS-75 E-set from Festool with the grit sizes P40, P60, P80, P100, P120 and P150. The evaluation of the roughness parameters Ra, Rp, Rv, Rz, and Rt was carried out using a digital microscope with a 2.5 mm L-filter and an 8 μm S-filter under the conditions of the technical standard STN EN ISO 21920. The measured results were supported using microscopic analysis of the surface topography especially for surfaces with very high roughness. The experiment shows a lower surface roughness of beech wood sanded with an eccentric sander. The sander created a surface with smaller grooves, removed more protruding fibers and created a more homogeneous surface suitable for subsequent surface treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Technology and Solutions for Wood Processing)
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20 pages, 8433 KiB  
Article
Effect of Tannic Acid on the Corrosion Behavior of W18Cr4V in a Simulated Wood Environment and Its Inhibition Mechanism
by Na Jia, Chunxin Wang, Chunpu Zhang and Jiuqing Liu
Forests 2023, 14(9), 1781; https://doi.org/10.3390/f14091781 - 31 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1024
Abstract
This study explores the effect of tannic acid on the corrosion of woodworking tool material W18Cr4V in a simulated wood environment. The weight loss method, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used to study the corrosion and the corrosion inhibition process of [...] Read more.
This study explores the effect of tannic acid on the corrosion of woodworking tool material W18Cr4V in a simulated wood environment. The weight loss method, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used to study the corrosion and the corrosion inhibition process of W18Cr4V in an environment of acetic acid solution with different concentrations of tannic acid. The results show that after continuous immersion for 20 h, low concentrations (1 wt% and 3 wt%) of tannic acid promoted the corrosion of W18Cr4V, while high concentrations (5 wt% and above) of tannic acid had a significant anti-corrosion effect, with a corrosion inhibition efficiency of about 64% for 10 wt% tannic acid. Scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to further verify and elucidate the inhibition mechanism. It was found that tannic acid can form a dense and effective corrosion inhibition film composed of iron–tannin complexes on the surface of W18Cr4V. This study not only provides a new perspective on understanding the corrosion effect of tannic acid on woodworking tools but also offers new insights for developing effective bio-corrosion protection strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Technology and Solutions for Wood Processing)
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