Special Issue "New Insights into Milk and Dairy Products: Quality and Sustainability"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Dairy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 6 April 2023 | Viewed by 2151

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Piero Franceschi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Science, University of Parma, Strada del Taglio 10, I-43126 Parma, Italy
Interests: quality of milk and cheese; dairy yield and cheesemaking efficiency; proteolysis, lipolysis and glycolysis in cheeses; effect of animal breed on milk quality and on its dairy properties; effect of milk cooling on its quality and its dairy properties; effect of milk somatic cells content on its chemical and technological properties
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Paolo Formaggioni
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Science, University of Parma, Strada del Taglio 10, I-43126 Parma, Italy
Interests: milk composition; milk proteins; milk minerals; milk quality for cheesemaking; rennet-coagulation of milk; cheese yield; composition of milk of different species
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

In general, the primary requirement for all dairy products is safety. However, the quality of milk and dairy products must also be considered. For example, the ability of milk to coagulate into rennet is a basic requirement for milk destined for cheesemaking, as it affects cheese yield and quality. However, rheological and microbiological features are also important for obtaining dairy products suitable for different aims. New information on the influence of genetic, physiological, pathological, environmental and technological factors on the quality characteristics of milk and dairy products will contribute to the progress of the sector.

Furthermore, milk and dairy products are also important sources of nutrients for humans, such as proteins, lipids, calcium and vitamins.

A number of by-products such as milk whey and buttermilk are produced by the dairy industry. These can be utilised for other aims due to their high nutritive value. Their reutilisation also reduces the environmental impact of pollution generated by the industry.

Milk from certain species is still not being studied or is not well-characterised; these milks could also be utilised to obtain new dairy products.

All contributions dealing with the above-mentioned topics are welcome.

Dr. Piero Franceschi
Dr. Paolo Formaggioni
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Milk and dairy product production;
  • Milk and dairy product composition;
  • Milk and dairy product nutritional properties;
  • Milk and dairy product safety;
  • Milk coagulation properties and curd rheology;
  • Cheese making and processing;
  • Effects of genetic and environmental factors on milk and dairy product characteristics;
  • Milk and dairy product microbiology;
  • Dairy technology;
  • Milk and dairy product safety.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Microbiological, Physicochemical and Nutritional Properties of Fresh Cow Milk Treated with Industrial High-Pressure Processing (HPP) during Storage
Foods 2023, 12(3), 592; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12030592 - 31 Jan 2023
Viewed by 382
Abstract
The safety, shelf life, and quality of fresh cow milk treated using industrial High-Pressure Processing (HPP) treatment at 600 MPa for 10 min was studied to identify the novelty of this non-thermal technology in milk processing. Changes in microbiological and physicochemical properties, including [...] Read more.
The safety, shelf life, and quality of fresh cow milk treated using industrial High-Pressure Processing (HPP) treatment at 600 MPa for 10 min was studied to identify the novelty of this non-thermal technology in milk processing. Changes in microbiological and physicochemical properties, including nutritional values of vitamins and amino acid profiles, were measured for a 60-day storage period at 6 °C +/− 1 °C. The HPP treatment produced milk that met all microbial safety requirements and exhibited a shelf life beyond 60 days in a hot and humid region. High physicochemical stability was achieved, with consistent pH and undetectable titratable acidity. The HPP treatment successfully retained all vitamins and minerals, including calcium (99.3%), phosphorus (99.4%), and magnesium (99.1%). However, the 60-day storage caused some degradation of Vitamin A (25%), B3 (91%), B5 (35%), B6 (80%), and C (85%), and minerals, including potassium (5%) and zinc (18%) when compared with fresh milk. This research has shown that the adoption of advanced treatment with HPP is very beneficial to the dairy industry in preserving milk quality in terms of its physicochemical and nutritional properties and extending its storage shelf life beyond 60 days. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Milk and Dairy Products: Quality and Sustainability)
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Article
The Ability of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli to Grow in Raw Cow’s Milk Stored at Low Temperatures
Foods 2022, 11(21), 3411; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11213411 - 28 Oct 2022
Viewed by 710
Abstract
Despite the lack of scientific evidence, some consumers assert that raw milk is a natural food with nutritional and immunological properties superior to pasteurized milk. This has led to the increased popularity of unpasteurized cow milk (UPM) and disregard for the risks of [...] Read more.
Despite the lack of scientific evidence, some consumers assert that raw milk is a natural food with nutritional and immunological properties superior to pasteurized milk. This has led to the increased popularity of unpasteurized cow milk (UPM) and disregard for the risks of being exposed to zoonotic infections. Dairy cattle are healthy carriers of Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing E. coli (STEC), and contaminated UPM has caused STEC outbreaks worldwide. The association between STEC, carrying the eae (E. coli attachment effacement) gene, and severe diseases is well-established. We have previously isolated four eae positive STEC isolates from two neighboring dairy farms in the Southeast of Norway. A whole genome analysis revealed that isolates from different farms exhibited nearly identical genetic profiles. To explore the risks associated with drinking UPM, we examined the ability of the isolates to produce Stx and their growth in UPM at different temperatures. All the isolates produced Stx and one of the isolates was able to propagate in UPM at 8 °C (p < 0.02). Altogether, these results highlight the risk for STEC infections associated with the consumption of UPM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Milk and Dairy Products: Quality and Sustainability)
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Article
An Easy and Cheap Kiwi-Based Preparation as Vegetable Milk Coagulant: Preliminary Study at the Laboratory Scale
Foods 2022, 11(15), 2255; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11152255 - 28 Jul 2022
Viewed by 670
Abstract
In the present study, a kiwifruit aqueous extract was developed and used as a coagulant enzyme in cheesemaking. In detail, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was used to investigate the presence of actinidin, the kiwifruit enzyme involved in κ-casein hydrolysis, in different tissues (pulp, [...] Read more.
In the present study, a kiwifruit aqueous extract was developed and used as a coagulant enzyme in cheesemaking. In detail, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was used to investigate the presence of actinidin, the kiwifruit enzyme involved in κ-casein hydrolysis, in different tissues (pulp, peel, and whole fruit) of ripe and unripe kiwifruits. Data revealed the presence of the enzyme both in the peel and in the pulp of the fruit. Although the aqueous extract obtained from the kiwifruit peel was able to hydrolyze semi-skimmed milk, it did not break down κ-casein. The aqueous extract obtained from the pulp showed a hydrolytic activity toward both κ-casein and semi-skimmed milk. The values for milk-clotting and proteolytic activity of the kiwifruit pulp extract were evaluated at different temperatures and pH parameters in order to obtain a high value of the MCA/PA ratio; we found that a temperature of 40 °C in combination with a pH value of 5.5 allowed us to obtain the best performance. In addition, the data revealed a higher hydrolytic activity of the enzymatic preparation from ripe kiwifruits than that from unripe ones, suggesting the use of the extract from pulp of ripe kiwifruits in the laboratory-scale cheesemaking. The data showed that 3% (v/v) of the ripe kiwifruit pulp extract determined a curd yield of 20.27%, comparable to chymosin yield. In conclusion, the extraction procedure for kiwifruit aqueous extract proposed in the present study was shown to be a fast, cheap, chemical-free, and ecofriendly technology as a plant coagulant for cheese manufacturing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Milk and Dairy Products: Quality and Sustainability)
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